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8

Peri Megadim (OC 140 MZ 2) writes that perhaps if the mute is an extremely important person ("אדם חשוב גדול הדור") we can be lenient to allow others to say the blessing for him through Shomea' KeOneh, but the matter requires further investigation (צ"ע). Keren David (OC 27) takes it as obvious that this wouldn't work, and Shevet HaLevi (7:20:3) is inclined ...


8

While I do not in anyway meant to minimize the difficulty of removing profanity from one's vocabulary (or the effort of those who have been successful), it may be helpful to recall that if you have learned to use profanity you have probably already mastered not using it settings where such language is frowned upon. From my experience I would suggest the ...


8

Just a suggestion, but one which worked for me -- when I got married I thought to myself, "would it be appropriate for a 1 year old to have his or her first words be curses?" Children imprint on the language they hear around them. So I decided that I was going to keep myself from saying words for the sake of my as of yet unborn children. If I got into the ...


7

Is there an argument against this prohibition? It contradicts an explicit Gemara in Shabbat 40b: "והאמר אביי "דברים של חול מותר לאומרן בלשון קודש, של קודש אסור לאומרן בלשון חול To which Rashi elucidates: דברים של קדש. דברי תורה: אסור לאומרן. במקום הטנופת ואפי' בלשון חול:‏ In an unclean location one may chat in Lashon Hakodesh, whereas one ...


5

I would start by picking a window of time, maybe 30 min, maybe 15, where you can stay conscious and in control of what I am saying. "From 6 to 6:30 pm, I will not speak nivul peh." After a week, stretch that window. And then extend it again the third week. At some point, instead of taking on more time, move it to a more sensitive part of the day/week, like ...


4

All the techniques above are great techniques to help kick a habit. I'm just going to toss in my $.02, as it's different than what others have said and can also hopefully be helpful. This was one of the techniques I heard from my Rebbi, when he would speak about kicking bad habits. Another technique I've heard (used in many other instances as well) would be ...


3

Hashem is the master of existence and in essence, existence itself. He can manipulate any aspect of the world. Soundwaves are one aspect of physical existence, and as far as I know, they can only travel through a physical medium. So if we were to simply take your question at face value without any further assumptions, it wouldn't make sense for sound to ...


3

The halacha is that while one may not bring words of Torah into a beit hakiseh (loosely: outhouse) because of their sanctity, one may bring Hebrew writing without any problem. Arguably, then, one may also speak it without fear that it's too holy.


3

Haamek Davar explains that the snake did not and could not speak; rather, every creature has a mazal, an angel assigned to it, and it was the snake's mazal that spoke. [Presumably any mazal can speak.] And I now see that Rav Saadya Gaon, quoted by ibn Ezra, says similarly. Others quoted there say Eve understood the animals' sounds. Ibn Ezra himself says the ...


3

Words spoken instinctively are produced through muscle memory, rather than a conscious decision involving reflection. Something slips from your hand, you say, "xxxxxxx!". All muscle memories can be retrained, but your desire to exclaim will remain, so pick a replacement word for each of those you wish to purge, and then practice it, like a sportsperson or ...


2

Long term habits can be extremely difficult to reverse. As suggested above, the best idea is to identify the environments that cause you to speak profanity and avoid such situations as best as possible. Most of the time, people who speak profanity do so because they are frustrated or angry at someone. So, if you can, avoid the people and situations that ...


2

As not saying God or writing God are newly formed ideas that many consider to be from gentile sources, it should be considered a personal stringincy, and therefore the person who was taken on this additional stringincy should do what they feel is best. If they want to know what the majority of halakhists say regarding this manner, see the following: We ...


2

Rav Shmuel Vital (17th century) in the siddur חמדת ישראל says this. גם צריך להזהר מאד שלא להזכיר בפיו שם סמא"ל וזהו סוד מש"ה אלהים אחרים לא תזכירו וכו' ובפרט בלילה שאז היא שליטתו וממשלתו.ולא עוד אלא שגם הוא אסור להזכיר מעין דברים אלו כגון בני אדם הרגילים לומר בלשון לע"ז איל דייאבל"ו וכיוצא בדברים אלו אין להזכירם כלל לפי שגם השדי"ם הם בחלקו ומגביר כוחו ...


2

You seem to be basing your supposition that the universe may have been created by sound waves on the fact that Gensis 1:3 has "ויאמר אלקים", literally "God said". While I don't claim to understand what that means precisely, it doesn't seem to involve sound waves. Allow me to quote some of the commentary on that phrase, in my own loose translation: Ibn Ezra: ...


1

As for different languages: The גמרא סוטה דף לא states what דינים are only in לשון הקודש and that everything else is in all languages. The chafetz chaim in ביאור הלכה ס' סב states that a all languages are only considered a language for those who understand them. Rabbi moshe fienstien in igros או'ח ח''א ס' לב also paskans like the chafetz chaim and ...


1

No. Interesting reasoning, but I don't think it makes much sense. First of all, sound can't exist without matter. Sound itself isn't an actual "thing", but a vibration that propagates as a wave of pressure in a medium (like air). Just like ripples can't exist without the water, sound can't exist without the matter.


1

Rabbeinu Bechayei on Pirkei Avot 5:8 expands on the Mishnah citation that among the 10 things created during twilight prior to the start of Shabbat, is the mouth of the donkey that spoke to Bil'am. He states that all 10 things in the list were created for the honor of Israel. The main idea to be learned is that the donkey doesn't speak on its own, but ...



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