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8

The 3rd commandment is not to take a pointless oath in G-d's name (e.g. swearing that a table is a table, and other pointless oaths, see ch 1) as is codified by Rambam (Hilchos Shvuos) and Sefer HaChinuch(30). By swearing pointlessly invoking the name of G-d, one trivializes G-d's significance as the singular force in the Universe. Rambam (Hilchos Berachos ...


5

Here's a shiur talking exactly about your question (haven't listened to it) I would define texting and using social media sites to be basically the same thing. http://www.yutorah.org/lectures/lecture.cfm/782704/Rabbi_Aryeh_Lebowitz/Ten_Minute_Halacha_-_Talking_Texting_and_Eating_in_the_Bathroom (in English). Some sources discussing something similar to your ...


5

Our Sages teach that "silence is a fence for wisdom" (Avos 3:13). Rabbeinu Yonah (ibid.) mentions two ways through which silence begets wisdom. Firstly, it trains a person to avoid interrupting his fellow or feeling like he has to speak up even if he does not know the answer to a question, and these qualities are conducive to wisdom. Secondly, as mentioned ...


5

The Baal Shem Tov: When silent one is able to think (about higher worlds - Mizritcher Maggid), which creates wisdom. (Slightly simplified). The Mizritcher Maggid: When silent he receives from levels higher than him, but when being a giver [speaking] he cannot be a receiver.


4

It's pretty hard to ask any questions from the first two chapters of Genesis, considering both the esoteric nature of both the topic and the fact that the world seems to have rather different back then in a way that may be inherently incomprehensible for us now that we've been evicted from Eden. That being said, there are several approaches to this ...


4

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems. However, he writes, this is not strictly a violation of consulting with the dead (see Deut. 18:11) since the communication is understood to go only one-way.


3

One is allowed to speak Lashon Hora about a non-Jew. The Pasuk says "לֹא-תֵלֵךְ רָכִיל בְּעַמֶּיךָ" - "Thou shalt not go up and down as a talebearer among thy people" (Leviticus 19:16). The words "among thy people" teach you that one is only forbidden to speak Lashon Hora about those who are included within "thy people". This goes so far as to include a Jew ...


3

Before Rosh Hashanah, and especially on the day before the holiday begins, it is a long-standing custom to visit gravesites and to exhort the tzadikim there to intercede for us on the day of judgement. However, we do not direct our prayers toward the dead who rest there; rather, we implore G-d to have mercy on us for their sake. (Kitzur Shulchan ...


2

Per Shaalos U'teshuvos Maharsham 1:1 - paragraph 3 Tosefta Menachos Perek 6 - says that Tefila and Hallel are Meakev each other, that one is not Yotzei Tefila until you say Hallel. However at the end of the paragraph he says that based on the Perisha 122 the main prohibition of interruption is only on the Shaliach Tzibur. It seems to me that based on this ...


2

This site says there is no source for the Taanis Dibbur but that it is mentioned by the Mishnah Berurah 571 (1) MB [2] where the Mishnah Berurah says that he saw written in a book that when someone wants to offer a voluntary fast it's better if he accepts a Taanis Dibbur rather than holding himself back from food since he will have no bodily harm from it ...


2

When it comes to relationships the Sefarim do not call the body parts by their name. It is called אותו מקום. This would indicate to me that it is inappropriate to write Nivul Pe. I would say that it can cause one to read it out loud and say it.


2

I saw at The Yeshiva World a post that included the words: One who speaks during Chazoras Hashatz causes the Shechinah to leave Klal Yisroel, and it is as if he has sinned with Avodah Zorah. Drush Chasam Sofer vol2pg309b but I didn't see it here on a quick check.


2

My grandfather has a saying that we were given two ears and one mouth so that way we would listen to others twice as much as we talk and then one one adds the knowledge and wisdom gained from another person to one's own knowledge and wisdom you become twice as smart as before.


2

The Lubavitcher Rebbe discusses this at length according to Rashi and the plain meaning of the verses (there are others who say that the very ability to speak was something just special for that occasion). He brings up a two possibilities: It is obvious. Everyone sees snakes don't talk, so there is no need to specify that this was included. (He rejects ...


1

In one the hayom yoms it says that it is even worse to speak lashon horo about a goy because it can also be a chilul Hashem


1

(May this answer also be in the merit of a speedy rescue to the three kidnapped boys - גיל-עד מיכאל בן בת גלים, אייל בן איריס תשורה ויעקב נפתלי בן רחל דבורה) The answer can be found in Chapter 2 of "Sha'ar HaTevunah" in sefer "Shmiras HaLashon" - http://shmirashalashon.blogspot.com/2006/12/shmiras-halashon-kislev-20-eightieth.html “The [attribute of] ...


1

Among the many other miracles that occurred in that period, there were times when the entire nation was simultaneously able to hear Moses speaking. This is how we understand when the verse says that the entire congregation of Israel assembled and was addressed. These miracles are known as המועט המחזיק את המרובה - the small that contains the many. This means ...


1

Jews understand the 3rd commandment to mean: refrain from mentioning Gcd's name in vain. The only time Jews actually pronounce Gcd's names are: When praying When making an oath in a Jewish court of law (Bet Din) When reading entire verses from the Bible When teaching children how to pray Even writing out Gcd's name is problematic, according to some ...


1

(I can't think of an explicit connection off the top of my head, but here goes): The Sifrei (B'midbar 153) writes that Moshe Rabbeinu's prophecy was superior to that of other prophets, because Moshe sometimes prophesied on a level connoted by the word "davar", while other prophets prophesied on a lower level as connoted by the word "amar": זה הדבר, ...


1

I was just reading Pesachim the other day and it discussed the issues of euphemism and dignified language. I would interpret the examples to mean that yes, it is nivul peh to directly use the phrase to ask if it is prohibited, although you do want to balance these concerns with the need for brevity. Pesachim I opens with a mishna in which Yehuda HaNasi ...


1

From the Ben Ish Chai Shana Alef Parshas vayetzei 10 talking should not be done but to make noises is fine ,it is saying words(letters) that is problematic.It seems that texting words should be fine.


1

In between aliyos, the custom is to permit talking when important. During kaddish, chazaras hashatz, and during the actual kriyah, I don't think it's allowed.



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