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6

This question assumes that the Rishonim or Acharonim grappled with this question. Most were not aware of contemporary sources omitting this miracle, such that they would ask the question and answer it. If you want, instead, a defense of the existence of the oil miracle, here are two. That "II Maccabees is, as is well known, an abridgement of a five-book ...


0

Additional sources regarding shoes, sandals and slippers (but not socks) include: Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, in Parashat Pinhas Shana Sheniya, 16 Rav Haim Kanievsk There is also a disagreement on the length of sleep required for this to be a problem.


2

In his introduction to Perek Cheilek, the Rambam writes that there are three kinds of people with different attitudes towards statements of Chazal that they don't understand: (1) those who accept their words according to their simplistic (and erroneous) understanding, thereby distorting their true meaning, (2) those who don't understand them and write them ...


2

According to the Babylonian Talmud, b. Pesahim 10:1, IV.34.A (Folio 111A), the meaning of "darkness" is in reference to demonic power. In the following passage cited, the literal allusions to tree shade are in reference to invisible darkness (demonic power), which is "darkness." Please click the image to enlarge. Conversely, the Talmud makes reference in ...


1

I've seen this in two places. One is in the Sichos of the Lubavitcher Rebbe who comments on Yosef's amazing sensitivity that he had towards others. This is also noted by R. Yaakov Kamenetsky, in Emes L'Yaakov (40:6) who adds that this is particularly remarkable given his own situation, that he asked others how they were doing in an effort to cheer them up. ...


0

I'm not sure if this is exaclty what you're looking for, but the Rambam discusses Chazal's use of the term עינא בישא, and says that lehalakha, the way that we pasken, it isn't something that one shouldn't normaly care about. One might imply from this that the Rambam believed that either R. Abba amar R. Huna or whichever amora quoted him (Bava Basra 2b) ...


5

The Kaf HaChaim writes in Yoreh Deah siman 116 number 149 "a woman that begins to nurse her son should begin nursing from the left breast first". He writes that his source is the Tzava'as Rebbe Yehudah HaChasid #69 and the sefer Shmiras HaNefesh #17. The sefer Mishnas Yehoshua footnote #18 (on the linked page) mentions that according to the sefer Shmiras ...


3

Otzer Kol Minhagei Yeshurin & Nitei Gavriel Chanuka 40:18 mention a reason from the Binyan Shlomo 38 that this is based on the Rambam that when they when one lit the candles in the morning he is also doing the Mitzva if the candles extinguished. Nitei Gavriel also mentions in the name of Nehar Mitzrayim that it is done for Pirsumei Nisa. The Nehar ...


5

The custom is not to exempt the homeless, it's for pirsumei nisa; while nobody would notice candles during the day if they're by someone's house, today the lighting of Chunnukah candles in shul is noticeable enough that, while there's certainly no obligation to do so, the custom developed to light there as well. The Pri Megadim (Eishel Avraham 670:2), ...


7

There's an article on this by Dose of Halacha. Here's an excerpt: While the Rema (OC 671:7) follows the Rivash that one can’t fulfil one’s obligation to light through the shul’s menora, the Kolbo (44) writes that one reason for this minhag is on behalf of those who don’t light at home. The Beis Yosef (OC 671:7) writes similarly that visitors can fulfil ...


2

Tehilim is like (lihavdel) poetry it can be interpreted differently and the author had all the meanings in mind see Rashi on 23.2 ...David recited this psalm in the forest of Hereth (I Sam. 22:5). Why was it called Hereth? Because it was as dry as a potsherd (חרס) and the Holy One, blessed be He, moistened it with the good of the world to come (Mid. ...


1

See Pri Tzadik Chelek Aleph on the first chapter on Chanukah (page 136 in the more common edition: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=21327&st=%D7%97%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%9B%D7%94&pgnum=235&hilite=27a5da15-dd79-4acf-bae5-d529fa949c80) He asks the question why are the laws of Chanukah discussed in the Talmud in Shabbos and rather one would ...


6

The actual source is from non-Jewish naturalists, dating in some for back to Aristotle, who also believed in some sense that man is in a different category (teleologically, and therefore categorically). It was later refined into a rigorous taxonomic system. The idea was picked up by Jewish scholars from the Medieval Era, though some of them use the word ...


3

I found the Gemorrah to be Shabbos 118B not 118A, Rashi in Bamidbar, at the end of Shelach says that the Jews had already kept one Shabbos, before the story of the Mekoshesh Etzim - wood gatherer, so it makes sense to say that this would be meaning - should the Jews keep one more Shabbos (a total of two), the Geula would come.


5

At the back of Yabia Omer Vol 10 OC (Siman 55), he has notes on Rav Poalim. There, in section 37 he writes as follows: ח"ב חאו"ח סימן סב. נשאל הרהמ"ח על מ"ש הרמ"א (סי' תרו ס"א) שאם ביקש מחילה מחבירו כדת, ולא רצה למחול לו, יאמר אח"כ בפני עשרה שביקש ממנו מחילה. האם מועיל לומר כן אפילו בפני עשר נשים. והשיב, דלכתחלה יאמר במעמד עדה שהם ...


1

There's a Gemara (Yoma 77a) which says that Hashem punished Gavriel with "60 Pulsa NeDenura" (whippings of fire). It implies that he made some kind of mistake there.


3

Rabbi Eliyahu Lopian citing the 'Sabba' of Kelm in the fomer's work Lev Eliyahu (Wisdom and Ethics, section 1 page 297) states without attribution that angels have free will but are so overpowered by their holiness (closeness to God?) they they choose not to sin. The author of Shevet Mussar in his work Aggadat Eliyahu (expounding on Yerushalmi Brachot 1:7) ...


3

This is from an old Jewish Polish folk tale. A man's house is too crowded, so the rabbi tells him to bring in all his animals, one species at a time. When there are no more to being in, he tells him to take them all out. All of a sudden, the house feels so much roomier, despite staying exactly the same. Links: ...


3

The Ibn Ezra chapter 37 verse 36 writes שר הטבחים. תמצא זה הלשון על הרג ועל בישול. ודברי המתרגם נכונים. We find the use of this word for killing and for cooking. And the words of the Targum are proper. The fancy edition brings instances of these usages. For the killing option he sends to Daniel 2 14 רב טבחיא די מלכא די נפק לקטלה לחכימי בבל. For the ...


4

Nitei Gavriel - Shiduchim V'Tanaim - page 360 - 32:4 actually brings a few different Minhagim. 1 - The mothers break the plate 2 - The fathers break the plate 3 - The Chassan and the two fathers break one plate and the Kallah and the two mothers break a second plate. He does not give any reason as to why those that do it in any particular fashion, do it ...


2

DanF got it right. "Tabach" means "butcher." Modern Hebrew has confused that with cooking a bit, a kitchen is called a "mitbach", again, old-fashioned cooks had to slaughter their own stuff. As for the Sar Hatabachim, Ramban says we don't know if his job was butchering animals, or if he was an executioner! (The latter would make sense as the guy has his own ...


1

I'm guessing he was not quoting verbatim and he mixed two medrashim as I will show you. He also seems to have misquoted the one you are looking for. Here is a first quote from him. "More deeply, the Midrash in Breshit Rabbah converts Jacob's vow from a request for supplying his needs to an obligation that he accepted upon himself toward God. Thus: If God ...


3

@Gershon Gold is correct that the term for cooking is בישול. Refer to the Targum and Peirush Yonatan on Breishit 43:16, where Yosef uses the term טבוח טבח. There, Peirush Yonatan says that this refers to "slaughtering" or "butchering" a goat. So, your original assumption seems correct that the Sar Hatabahim was the chief butcher. As to how the term "מטבח" ...


3

After a basic review of the sources, I would say that the basic answer to your questions are: No, there is no source that says that we have to cover our mouths when we yawn to avoid evil spirits entering our bodies. In fact, to my knowledge, there is no source that says that one is required to do so at all except in prayer. No, the only reason found in ...


3

The custom of covering your mouth while yawning is common in several cultures, but so far, from searching secular sources, I have not found any such customs or requirements with Jewish origins. In Yawning: comparative study of knowledge and beliefs, popular and medical, O. Walusinski writes: According to [Pierre] Saintyves, Islam sees yawning as a sign ...


2

Noheg B'am - page 87 in the second column at the bottom in the name of Sefer Mili L'Mordechai mentions this Minhag for Shavuos based on the Targum Sheni in Megilas Esther Chapter 3. Haman told Achashveirosh that in Sivan the Jews go to their synagogues and throw apples. He mentions this Minhag is mentioned by רבי דוד הסבעוני in the name of Rabeinu Maimon the ...


0

It's a din in Hilchos Derech Eretz. It's manners.


4

Rebi would cover his mouth when yawning during prayers. Brachos 24a-b: אמר ר' חנינא אני ראיתי את רבי שגיהק ופיהק ונתעטש ורק וממשמש בבגדו אבל לא היה מתעטף וכשהוא מפהק היה מניח ידו על סנטרו


10

שלחן ערוך סימן צז סעיף א (titled: "שלא יגהק ושלא יפהק בשעת התפלה," "Not to yawn during prayers") לא יגהק (מוציא מגופו לפיו נפיחה מתוך שובעו, רייטי"ר בלע"ז). ולא יפהק (פותח פיו להוציא רוח הפה) ואם צריך לפהק מתוך אונס יניח ידו על פיו שלא תראה פתיחתו. Do not burp or yawn [during prayers]; and if one must yawn, one should cover his mouth with his ...


5

I think the real answer is that he meant 15b. ויהי בימי שפוט השופטים. דור ששופט את שופטיו. אמר לו טול קיסם מבין עיניך. אומר לו טול קורה מבין עיניך. אמר לו כספך היה לסיגים. אמר לו סבאך מהול במים. And it was in the days of the judges judging. The generation was judging the judges. The judge would say remove a twig from between your eyes, the person would ...


3

אין אדם רואה חוב אצל עצמו. כתובות קה ע׳ב. This is in a few other places in ש׳ס too.


2

Mishna Negaim 2:5 כל הנגעים אדם רואה חוץ מנגעי עצמו also in Ran Nedarim 8b seventh wide line


1

Sholom Mordechai Hakohen Schwadron (Hebrew: הרב שלום מרדכי הכהן שבדרון‎) (1912–21 December 1997) edited and published two famous mussar texts composed by his teachers — Ohr Yahel by Rabbi Leib Chasman and Lev Eliyahu by Rabbi Elyah Lopian. Our Rav quoted Rav Chasman as having stated that the malach was stating that this is his name. When an enemy general ...


2

This article brings sources from Torah, Mechilta, Sifri, Bavli, Yerushalmi, a selection of midrashim, Targum Yonason, Mishne Torah, Rabbeinu Yonah, Droshos HoRan, Menoras Hameor, Maharal, Kli Yokor, Malbim, Sefas Emes, Chochmoh Umussar and Reb Yerucham.


0

It's the ... Shaagas Aryeh, I think? Noda Bihuda maybe? -- who observes that some hosts throw challah across that table rather than pass it. He suggests that the sacrificial meat actually had to be thrown, rather than placed, onto the fire of the mizbeach, so perhaps this connects to this practice. As for apples, my impression was that the rebbe is focused ...


1

I have spent time over several days unsuccessfully trying to locate my copy of "Eye of the Needle" (which incidentally I see is recommended in the link you provided) but in the index there is a copy of the Jewish Observer article which you and your source have mentioned. My recollection of the article is that it didn't merely mention this idea in his name ...


0

He may be thinking of Bamidbar Raba, Naso 10:5, but that's about a different angel, the one that came to Manoach's wife. It says: והוא פלאי שם שמו המלאך פלאי "it's פלאי" - the angel set his name as פלאי (translation according to the Mat'nos K'huna)


12

Megillah 28b (English) ההוא דהוי תני הלכתא סיפרא וסיפרי ותוספתא ושכיב אתו ואמרו ליה לרב נחמן ליספדיה מר אמר היכי נספדיה הי צנא דמלי סיפרי דחסר there was a certain man who used to repeat halachoth, Sifra and Sifre and Tosefta, and when he died they came and said to R. Nahman, Sir, will you deliver a funeral oration for him, and he said, How are ...


2

Metzudat David interprets the verse in Jeremiah differently, (though in the Mikraot Gedolot, he is the only one to do so). He says that Jeremiah is telling Hananiah that He hopes Hananiah is right, but that bad prophecies have happened before, and just because Hananiah is prophesying for good doesn't make him any more believable than Jeremiah, unless the ...


18

Perhaps they are referring to the idea mentioned here. That is one shouldn't invite anyone to a bris as declining such an invitation would be bad (Rema Yoreh Deah 265:12). But if you don't receive an invitation at all, one can choose not to show up.


-1

Rabbi Abraham Zacuto (1452-1514) was a contemporary of Leonardo da Vinci, a leading astronomer who stood at the cradle of great geographical discoveries of 16th century, advised Columbus and guided Vasco da Gama, was a luminary at the Court of Kings of Spain and Portugal, merged science and Kabbala, taught at Salamanca University and lived in the ...


2

Here's another "grain of salt" answer. If you accept the Vilna Gaon's drasha on Melachim Aleph 7:23, then Shlomo HaMelech knew pi to be 333/106=3.14151, a value not surpassed in accuracy by the scientific community for more than 1000 years, with Ptolemy's publication of 3.1416 in c150 CE.


1

אמר רב יהודה אמר רב אסי (אמר רב) אסור להרצות מעות כנגד נר חנוכה כי אמריתה קמיה דשמואל אמר לי וכי נר קדושה יש בה מתקיף לה רב יוסף וכי דם קדושה יש בו דתניא ושפך וכסה במה ששפך יכסה שלא יכסנו ברגל שלא יהו מצות בזויות עליו (Shabbos 22a) Rav Yehuda said in the name of Rav Assi: One is not allowed to count money to the light of the Channuka lights. When ...


2

As a supplement to Matt's answer; see Mishna Berura 2:1, who writes that מיושב: דאז בהכרח יתגלה גופו והאדם צריך להתנהג בצניעות ובושה לפני הקב"ה ואפילו כשהוא לילה ובחדרי חדרים הלא מלא כל הארץ כבודו וכחשיכה וכאורה לפניו יתברך....ע"כ האנפלאות יראה ללבשם או לפשטם ג"כ תחת הסדין שלא לגלות רגליו שדרכן להיות מכוסות לעולם במדינות אלו שאין הולכין יחף אפילו ...


11

The Gemara (Yoma 78b) writes that one who sleeps with shoes on, 'has tasted a taste of death', and since tasting death is probably not a good thing, some poskim write that sleeping with shoes on should be avoided (see Kaf Hahayyim Y.D 116:211, for example). The book Shemiras Haguf Vehanefesh (no. 115) also writes that wearing shoes to sleep causes someone to ...


4

Sure, in his book "זריעה ובניין בחינוך" he wrote that once or twice. I didn't find a digital edition of this book to quote from, but I remember it very well from learning this book last year... EDIT: I would scan it if it was not copyrighted, but from page 44 to 46 Rav Shlomo Wolbe talks about it. Actually I didn't find your exact quote, but the idea is ...


6

Talmud / avoda zora 3A אין הקב"ה בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו the Holy One, blessed be He, does not deal imperiously(sovereignty, despotic rule.) with His creatures. midrash / shimois rabba 34 אין הקב"ה בא בטרחות עם בריותיו לא בא על האדם אלא לפי כחו "G-d does not make matters difficult for His creatures; He expects a person to perform according to his ...


0

Chanoch ascribes to Rabbi E. E. Dessler the notion that everyone always has a spiritual level, and that any seeming challenge not at that level is not considered a challenge for him — it is either something he will certainly do right or something he will certainly do wrong, even if merely out of habit — so he gets no reward or punishment for it. ...


3

A source is Rabbi Nachman M'Breslov Zatzal לקו"ת מ"ז זכור תמיד: לעולם לא יושם בפניך מכשול שאין בכוחך להתגבר עליו



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