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5

This can be debated with sources and counter-sources forever and ever, but any reasonable treatment of the subject will involve this passage from the Talmud, Brachot 35b: ת"ר ואספת דגנך מה ת"ל לפי שנא' (יהושוע א) לא ימוש ספר התורה הזה מפיך יכול דברים ככתבן ת"ל ואספת דגנך הנהג בהן מנהג דרך ארץ דברי ר' ישמעאל ר"ש בן יוחי אומר אפשר אדם חורש בשעת חרישה וזורע ...


4

See Gemara Baba Kamma 80a מכי אתא רב לבבל רב ושמואל ורב אסי איקלעו לבי שבוע הבן ואמרי לה לבי ישוע הבן. ‏ Tosfot: לבי ישוע הבן. ...ור"ת פי' שנולד שם בן ועל שם שהולד נושע ונמלט ממעי אמו כדכתיב והמליטה זכר (ישעיה סו) נקט לשון ישועה והיו רגילין לעשות סעודה: ‏ Yeshua Haben, according to R"T is a meal before the Brit Mila. See Sde ...


3

The Yad Malachi (18th century) (klalei haposqim: klalei hashulhan arukh ve'rama) quotes a responsum of R. Samuel Aboab (17th century) (responsum #251) as stating that he heard that R. Karo delegated the authorship of the Shulhan Arukh, a summary of his Beit Yosef, to his students. The lack of a single author resulted in occasional internal contradictions: ...


3

As far as I know about the song, "we want moshiach now" it was first sung in 1980 by a group of campers. The Rebbe began clapping along as approval and afterwards encouraged singing it. The song itself was written by campers and then received the Rebbe's approval after it was first sung in front of him. As to why this kindergarten does this after ...


2

See this article, and especially this quote from the Talmud Yerushalmi: On the day that the Holy Temple was destroyed, a Jew was plowing his field when his cow suddenly called out. An Arab was passing by and heard the low of the cow. Said the Arab to the Jew: "Son of Judah! Unyoke your cow, free the stake of your plow, for your Holy Temple has now been ...


2

Derech Pikudecha (Bnei Yisoschor)- page 162 - paragraph starting with Gimel says that one has a limit on the amount of words in his lifetime and if he speaks too much is shortening his life. קיבלנו מרבותינו בפסוק: 'נפשי יצאה בדברו', שיש שיעור לאדם כמה ידבר כל ימי חייו, ואם ירבה לדבר שלא במקום מצווה, הנה ממעט החיות Sefer Darkei Tzedek - page 10 - #54 ...


2

R. Dr. David Katz discusses this phenomenon: There were only two occasions where the communal rabbi was actually expected to preach to his community. First there was the pair of Sabbaths, the Sabbath before Passover, and the Sabbath before Yom Kippur. These were occasions where, according to the Talmud (Megillah 32a) since the days of Moses the official ...


1

Traditionally Karaites have not celebrated Hanukkah. (sources). In modern times, assimilation being what it is, there are undoubtedly some who do, but it's not on the Karaite calendar. The Karaites had two main objections: The Rabbis did not have the authority to establish a holiday (Purim is different, you can read about the karaite take on that here). ...


1

Rashi to Shmuel II 19:1: my son, my son: My son, my son eight times; seven that brought him forth from the seven levels of Gehinnom, and one that brought him into the world to come. (Referring to Dovid about his recently dead son Avshalom). Although standard Rashi prints don't seem to source it, it is a statement found in the Talmud, Sota 10b. Tosofos ...


1

A possible source of this saying is, perhaps, by establishing a connection between two quotes: "A fool is not aware of his folly" (Gemara in Shabbos 13b), therefore if you tell him he is fool, he will be angry, because "Anger rests in the heart of fools" (koheles 7:9)



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