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Deuteronomy 34 6: ולא ידע איש את קברתו עד היום הזה. In סוטה י׳ד ע׳א we find רבי חמא בר חנינא giving the reason it was hidden so that the Jews would not be able to go pray at his grave when going into galus. אמר רבי חמא בר חנינא מפני מה נסתר מקום קבורתו של משה מעיני בשר ודם, שגלוי וידוע לפני הקב׳ה שעתיד בית המקדש ליחרב וישראל יגלו מארצם, שמא יבאו לקברו של ...


5

Deuteronomy 34:5-6: וַיָּ֨מָת שָׁ֜ם מֹשֶׁ֧ה עֶֽבֶד־יְהוָ֛ה בְּאֶ֥רֶץ מוֹאָ֖ב עַל־פִּ֥י יְהוָֽה׃ וַיִּקְבֹּ֨ר אֹת֤וֹ בַגַּיְ֙ בְּאֶ֣רֶץ מוֹאָ֔ב מ֖וּל בֵּ֣ית פְּע֑וֹר וְלֹֽא־יָדַ֥ע אִישׁ֙ אֶת־קְבֻ֣רָת֔וֹ עַ֖ד הַיּ֥וֹם הַזֶּֽה׃ So Moses the servant of the LORD died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the LORD. And he was buried in the ...


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The source is Shulchan Oruch Orach Chayim 487 (4) בליל ראשון של פסח גומרים את ההלל בצבור בנעימה בברכה תחלה וסוף ובן בליל שני של שני ימים טובים של גליות On the first night of Pesach, we complete the Hallel with the community with a pleasant tune and a blessing at the beginning and end. The same is on the second night outside Israel. The Rema ...


4

Rav Moshe Feinstein in his Igros Moshe Chelek 8:4 YD :11 writes that going to theaters and stadiums do not fall into the prohibition of bechukoseihem lo tolechu. However, he writes that one is prohibited from attending due to moshev letzim, bitul Torah (eventually l'gamri), nivul peh (promiscuity). Rav Moshe is clear that it is a forbidden to attend such ...


3

According to this source, it is a bubbe meisse The custom was common among Jews from Lithuania and Galicia. The ear pulling was done when someone sneezed while speaking about a dead person. Some people always pulled one or both ears after sneezing and said, Tzu lange mazaldikke yohrn - "To long, lucky years". I've never seen this done to anyone including ...


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The short answer(s): (a) Rashi, Tosafot, the Ran, the Rosh, the Tur (according to the Rema in Darkei Moshe EH 115 #4) and the Shulchan Aruch (EH 21:2, 115:4) all understand the Mishna/Gemara on Ketubot 72a to mean that a woman has no obligation (a priori) to cover her hair in her courtyard, and certainly not at home, even though it may be praiseworthy to do ...


2

In codifying the obligation to study Torah, Rambam never delineates any set components of Torah that a person must study (in the first chapter of Hilchot Talmud Torah, in the rest of that section, or anywhere else that I am aware of). Accordingly, we can infer that there is no obligation to learn "kol haTorah kulah". This is inference is made by Heshy ...


2

Yes this is how the Rambam, Maimonides, codifies it (and he is one of the greatest codifiers of Jewish law). It is the last of the 613 mitzvot (commandments). As R Jack Abramowitz describes it The last of the 613 mitzvos is the obligation for every man to write a sefer Torah. Recognizing that not every individual possesses the requisite skill to do ...


1

I will answer this question with sources besides for Tanach. If you would prefer different sources, please clarify. The Talmud (Megillah 6b) expounds the verse in Zechariah (9:7): וַהֲסִרֹתִי דָמָיו מִפִּיו, וְשִׁקֻּצָיו מִבֵּין שִׁנָּיו, וְנִשְׁאַר גַּם-הוּא, לֵאלֹהֵינוּ; וְהָיָה כְּאַלֻּף בִּיהוּדָה, וְעֶקְרוֹן כִּיבוּסִי "And I will take away his ...


1

The question is highly perceptive. As this reference shows the matter is a source of discussion which Maimonides explains. The 613th mitzvah of the Torah is the obligation for every Jew to write a Torah scroll. In the words of the verse: "And now, write for yourselves this song, and teach it to the Children of Israel. Place it into their mouths, in ...


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There have been two published versions of English translations of R' Hirsch's commentary on the Torah: R' Isaac Levy's translation, published by Judaica Press, is out of print now, but can be found in many libraries and homes. Daniel Haberman's translation, published by Feldheim, was released more recently and is in print.


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In Navi, Chazal, and Rishonim, we can several cases of suicide, two points should be investigated, firstly the source of the prohibition. Secondly the retrospective vue about the suicided man. In some cases to choice the death is right, sometimes it is wrong. Retrospectively sometimes we do not blame the suicider because of a supposed judgment distorsion, ...


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There is no direct prohibition of suicide in the Bible. The Gemara (Bava Kama 91b) derives its prohibition by exegesis on the verse: "and surely your blood of your lives will I require" (Genesis 9: 5), interpreted as: "I will require your blood if you yourselves shed it." see also Bereishis Rabba 34:13 There are two famous cases of suicide in Tanach, Saul ...


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Pirqe'i Avot 5:22 states (my translation): בן בג בג אומר, הפך בה והפך בה, דכלא בה. Ben Bag Bag says, 'Delve in her and delve in her, for all is within her'. Rabbe'inu 'Ovadyah MiBartenura explains: הפוך בה והפוך בה - בתורה Delve in her and delve in her - In the Torah



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