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13

This is the interpretation of the Shem Mishmuel on the Parsha (5671). His reasoning is that the three 'blessings' of Sarah's tent correspond to three miracles that occurred in the Mishkan, the third of which was that the showbread remained fresh for the entire week. Therefore, he says that the 'blessing in the dough' means the same thing.


10

The sefer Toldos Tannaim and Amoraim here says that his name is Abba bar Abba. He adds that in the Gemora Bavli he is nearly always referred to as the Father of Shmuel, and in the Gemora Yerushalmi he is nearly always called Abba bar Abba. As to the reason for this appellation, he brings the explanation of the sefer Eshkol (Hilchos Mikvaos para. 59) that it ...


9

Sounds like you are referring to this מדרש רבה במדבר פרשה ג פסקה א "ר תנחומא מעשה בתמרה אחת שהיתה עומדת בחמתן ולא היתה עושה פירות והיו מרכיבין אותה ולא עשתה פירות אמר להם דקלי תמרה היא רואה מיריחו והיא מתאוה לה בלבה והביאו ממנה והרכיבו אותה מיד עשתה פירות כך כל תאותן וצפויין של צדיקים הקב"ה the gist is that there was a tree which would not produce ...


7

It is mentioned in the Igeres Hagra וכל רגע ורגע שהאדם חוסם פיו זוכה בשבילו לאור הגנוז שאין מלאך ובריה יכולים לשער


5

According to Rabbi Eliezer Zalmanov here in the comments, the earliest recorded source for this idea is in the commentary of Rabbeinu Yona to Pirkei Avos 1:5.


5

Talmud / avoda zora 3A אין הקב"ה בא בטרוניא עם בריותיו the Holy One, blessed be He, does not deal imperiously(sovereignty, despotic rule.) with His creatures. midrash / shimois rabba 34 אין הקב"ה בא בטרחות עם בריותיו לא בא על האדם אלא לפי כחו "G-d does not make matters difficult for His creatures; He expects a person to perform according to his ...


5

The Gemara (Yoma 78b) writes that one who sleeps with shoes on, 'has tasted a taste of death', and since tasting death is probably not a good thing, some poskim write that sleeping with shoes on should be avoided (see Kaf Hahayyim Y.D 116:211, for example). The book Shemiras Haguf Vehanefesh (no. 115) also writes that wearing shoes to sleep causes someone to ...


4

Sure, in his book "זריעה ובניין בחינוך" he wrote that once or twice. I didn't find a digital edition of this book to quote from, but I remember it very well from learning this book last year...


4

The Chazon Ish himself says that this is the common view among Chassidim. Indeed the Baal Shem Tov is well known to have defined it in the way the Chazon Ish says not to. It should be pointed out that the Chazon Ish's characterization is an oversimplification of the view. In this article, R. Shlomo Brody discusses various sources brought by R. Daniel Stein. ...


4

After rereading Rambam a couple of times, I think I disagree with your interpretation of his writing. The part you cut out reads: "Can there be a greater stumbling block than Christianity? All the prophets spoke of Mashiach as the redeemer of Israel and their savior who would gather their dispersed and strengthen their observance of the mitzvot. In ...


4

According to this article: Before the chuppah all the knots on the groom's garments are untied. This symbolizes that at the moment of marriage all other bonds are eliminated, except this intimate one made between the bride and groom. Apparently, this may be a Hassidic custom? I haven't seen any weddings where I have seen this done. Then, again, I ...


3

I can't help with a source of the story, but the distinction in usage seems to be clear. A fish is an animate being, with things that are detrimental to its own interests and things that the fish itself does not like. Therefore, love in that context would mean to look want what is best for it. Killing and eating the fish is not in the fish's best ...


3

It would seem that a woman does not need to follow her husband's minhagim for things that are considered ladies' mitzvos. Thus R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe EH 2:12) writes that it is up to a woman if she wants to wear a sheital (wig), and she doesn't need to follow her husband if he feels it's not good enough as this is one of her mitzvos. Rabbi Doniel ...


3

A source is Rabbi Nachman M'Breslov Zatzal לקו"ת מ"ז זכור תמיד: לעולם לא יושם בפניך מכשול שאין בכוחך להתגבר עליו


2

There is a seffer called Bitachon Ish who brings proofs to the Chazzon Ish's opinion from earlier sources. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/51363


2

Megillas Ester is actually the only exception to the normal rule that you must hear only the voice of the reader (OK, Hallel also, but no one fulfills Hallel by listening nowadays). Megillah 21b: תנו רבנן בתורה אחד קורא ואחד מתרגם ובלבד שלא יהא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובנביא אחד קורא ושנים מתרגמין ובלבד שלא יהו שנים קורין ושנים מתרגמין ובהלל ובמגילה ...


2

According to the Schechter Institute, it’s an unsourced explanation on a Midrash. The article also attempts to explain its lack of a written source. The author there writes that the actual Midrash mentions Iyov, not Avraham, as having a four-sided tent to welcome guests coming from all directions, but it goes on to state that, in comparison, Avraham was ...


2

According to this shuir(starting at 16:30) from Rav Shachter, quoting Rav Soleveitchik, this is not a minhag based on anything (minhag shtus).


1

This is a community wiki answer, which means that anyone with 100 reputation points or more can edit without review. Please feel free to add your own sources, keeping the structure I've set up. Also, please leave a comment regarding your addition, so that it's clear who said what :) Gemara Yoma 85a-b (which verse teaches that we violate שבת to save a ...


1

The earliest source that I am aware of is Avos Drav Nosson. see link: Interesting to note he mentions that Iyov also had a tent that was open to all 4 sides.


1

Conjecture: The Hebrew word "damim" means both blood and money. Perhaps, because of the use of the same word for distinct definitions, this adage arose. In a sense, it is saying, separate the "blood" or "damim" of your own family which is your own flesh and blood from the other definition of "damim" - money.


1

The line with the fish in the story is also printed in Lev Eliyahu from R' Elya Lopian tz"l in parshas Vayeitzei where he discusses the love Yaakov had for Rochel - a 'beautiful' peice if you can get you hands on it. ( Obviously, Reb Elya was using the line to describe true love, making @Shmuel's question valid) I think the lesson from the kotzker / Reb ...


1

Halacha Sefarim bring this down, including: The Ben Ish Chai: וכשאומר בעל גבורות ידגיש העי"ן שלא יבולע ויהיה כאומר בל גבורות ח"ו וכנז' בחס"ל


1

It would seem that all Chabad learning cycles are limited to 1 year or less (save for one exception). Keeping to a yearly cycle would seem logical as most of Judaism revolved around the a yearly cycle. Chumash - follows the parsha of the week and completes in 1 year Tehilim - Finished monthly Tanya - Was divided by the Rebbe Rayatz to be learned on a ...



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