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7

Am I the soul or the body? The answer is yes. The mashal is given of a blind man and a lame man in the king's orchard. The blind man put the lame man on his shoulders. The lame man steered the blind man to the fruit and they were able to collect a harvest. Emperor Antoninus asked Rabbi how there could be punishment in the life beyond, for, since ...


5

I asked R' Tzvi Berkowitz this question. He said that when one sleeps, 4 parts of the soul leave, while the lowest part of the soul remains with the body. The "me" in this prayer is that lowest level of soul, but not the body. I once heard R' Avrohom Schorr speak, and he quoted a Zohar which I did not manage to find afterwards, which said על בשר אדם - מלמד ...


4

The names of nefesh, ruach, neshamah, yechidah, chayah (in that order) is from Bereishis Rabba 14:11. I wish to add two more positions to the discussion. The first is Rav Saadia Gaon's (Emunos veDeios 6:3). Rav Saadia Gaon was an Aristotilian rationalist, although to a lesser extent than the Rambam, who had to deal with the topic when writing a commentary ...


3

The Ramchal believes that everyone has a tikkun, classical commentaries stick to your observation that the souls of the wicked are totally destroyed. Rabbi Dessler's take on this seems to be that the more you buy into the olam ha'dimyon the more of a dimyon you become to the extent that you may not be able to survive le'asid lavo. More to the point peshat ...


2

Rabbi Yitzchak Hutner explains that the yetzer hara has no substance inherently, only that which he has stolen from you where your 'spare' abilities were not utilised in the service of Hashem. Therefore all your feelings are either a glimpse into your soul or a mirror-image of a glimpse into your soul, but nevertheless a portal.


2

As for E-lokai Netzor and Hashem putting a soul within me, my own intent when saying these words is based on the Vilna Gaon's taxonomy of prayer: Prayers that express an ideal to be repeated and internalized are what we call "tefillah" in Hebrew. Tefillos are consistently written in the plural, as our connection to the community is part of that ideal. ...


2

R' Samson Raphael Hirsch translates1 "לְנֶפֶשׁ לֹֽא־יִטַּמָּא בְּעַמָּיו" in Leviticus 21:1 simply as "regarding no person among his people may he render himself impure." "נֶפֶשׁ," then, is a generic person, apparently in contradistinction to the family members listed in the next verses, for whom the kohen does "render himself impure." For a great deal ...


2

The word here (and in Lev 19:28) appears to refer to the tomb. For example, a few verses later in the same chapter (Lev 21:11) appears the phrase “resting places of the dead” (נַפְשֹׁ֥ת מֵ֖ת). The triliteral root (נ-פ-ש) includes the idea of Sabbath rest (see Exod 23:12; 31:17; 2 Sam 16:14). So, depending on the context, the meaning can mean tomb (resting ...


2

You're probably thinking of the "besheret", literally destiny, but understood to be analogous to soulmate. There is Jewish imagery which indicates that each man and woman were created as one entity metaphorically joined at the back, which was separated and brought into this world with the purpose of joining back together. This is purported to be based off ...


1

There is indeed a Jewish tradition of meditation. An authentic perspective has been codified by R Aryeh Kaplan in Jewish Meditation: A Practical Guide Meditation and the Bible (full text seems online here) Meditation and Kabbalah (full text seems online here) See R Kaplan himself in a rare video clip here. See also more here and here from Chabad.


1

I believe the answer is a machlokes rishonim. Rambam holds that the body is temporary, and that even after the coming of Mashiach and resurrection of the dead, the souls will stay in the purified body for a finite amount of time, eventually getting rid of it for good. (I think this is similar to what you were initially thinking.) Ramchal in Daas Tevunos ...


1

In the Talmud (Sanhedrin 91b) we find: Antoninus said to Rebbe At what point is the soul given to a human? Is it from the moment of decree [that such a child will exist], or from the moment of formation? He responded: "from the moment of formation." He replied, "is it possible that a piece of meat can last for three days without salt, and yet not become ...


1

The Rambam describes the nature of the soul and its faculties in Shemoneh Peraqim. There's a fair, not good, but fair scan of the English available online, but the Touger edition is particularly good and fairly inexpensive. It's short enough to not make sense to cite to, especially because the explanation spans all eight of the chapters, but I'll briefly ...



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