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1

Salamone de Rossi, a renaissance composer, wrote an Adon Olam. The base line sounds like the modern tune to my ears. YouTube link.


1

I spoke to a number of people regarding the different placements of Anim Zemiros. The reasoning I was told had to do with people not being there on time if done early on in Davening thus missing out on it, to not opening the Aron Kodesh special for it therefore saying it when the Aron Kodesh is opened for the reading of the Torah, to not saying it after ...


3

When The Village Stompers first released it in 1963, we believed that it was indeed an instrumentalization of (an already existing tune for) Adon Olam. I do not know if they ever "officially" announced it as such, but it seemed obvious (to us) that it was the same. I do know that we used it at summer camp. I think that the summer camp was the summer before, ...


0

This is my own reasoning; I don't have a source. Israel of course experienced other miracles before the yam suf, but until then they were still under Paro's control. They were not completely free to serve God and, ultimately, enter the covenant at Sinai. They could certainly have praised God for the earlier miracles (and maybe they did for all we know), ...


3

You must be talking about the song אויפן פריפעטשיק (Oyfn Pripetshik). The lyrics are listed below (according to the version sung by Ester Ofarim): .אויפן פריפעטשיק ברענט א פייערל, און אין שטוב איז הייס .און דער רבי לערנט קליינע קינדערלעך דעם אלף-בית .זעט זשע קינדערלעך געדענקט זשע טייערע, וואס איר לערנט דא !זאגט זשע נאך א מאל און טאקע נאך א מאל: קמץ-אלף - א ...


2

Thanks for the link to the Hebrew text - it just came in very handy! Let me add that Galaski's translation is indeed in the JPS-published anthology Trees, Earth, and Torah, edited by Ari Elon; I own a paper copy but have also been able to access the whole of that section on Google Books.


7

According to some research done by the zemereshet website, the song originated in a German cigarette company commercial ("Salam Alaikum" was its name), and performed by a Turkish band (they actually say "we smoke Salam Alaikum", and if you look at the commercial's slides, you're in for a weird experience). Later, in 1943, the same tune was found in an ...


1

According to this book, page 194, many of the "early Israeli" folktunes such as the one you mention were influenced by the culture of the early immigrants. This song comes from roughly the same era as the popular "Hava Nagila". "Heveinu Shalom Aleichem's" tune originated from a Hassidic tune. The words "Shalom Aleichem" are mentioned most notably as part of ...



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