Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

צור חבלי בעת צרה is an idiomatic expression. "צור חבלי" means literally "my rope's rock". It is referring to an anchor. So the plain translation (meaning according to peshat) is "My anchor in times of trouble." There are many ways to give it allegorical meaning as well as according to the Kabbalistic interpretations. But all these other meanings must relate ...


2

The Siddur Shay LaMora quotes the Olas Tamid according to Rashi's first explination to Tehillim 16:5 that it means all good that I have comes from Him.


3

I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


4

The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


4

A possible interpretation can be gleaned from the posuk in Yechezkel 27:8 where the term rope is used metaphorically to signify the ones steering the ship. And in Shmuel II 8:2 ropes are used metaphorically to signify control over life and death. Thus in keeping with the theme of the piyut that Hashem is “Master of the world”, we praise Hashem by ...


1

I noticed that the root form of חֶבלִי is חבל meaning "rope". However, I also did a Google translate on the full word חֶבלִי and it displayed the synonym נָחוּת which has one translation as "disadvantaged". This makes sense, in this context, as the word "chaval" is often said to someone when a tragedy or danger is mentioned. See also this site which gives a ...


1

The following is a footnote from an as yet unpublished Haggadah Yalkut (compiled by me). It discusses a possible 'origin' , or at least influence, on Echad Mi Yodea. Shmuel bet 24:1-14 tells us that the mageifa, a plague sent in the aftermath of David’s ill-advised census, should have lasted for 72 hours. Meam Loez, based on Pesikta Rabbati, informs us ...



Top 50 recent answers are included