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21

http://www.ou.org/torah/tt/5766/miketz66/specialfeatures.htm Rambam (Sh'vuos 12:9) rules that one who uses Hashem's Name in a meaningless oath or a an unwarranted blessing violates the Torah prohibition to use His Name in vain. One who utters His Name without a purpose transgresses the lower level, Torah commandment to fear His Name (ibid.:11).In ...


20

It's amazing what you can find on Hebrewbooks!... In Sifsei Chachamim, by R' Avraham Abba Hertzel (Bratislava, 1899), he says that this is based on the Gemara's statement (Megillah 15b, top) that "that wicked man had all of his treasures engraved on his chest" (evidently meaning that he wore a medallion, or something similar, that had all of his possessions ...


17

There is an old minhag Frankfurt to sing the first part of Lekha Dodi, which refers to exile, to a slow tune, and then switching to a happier nigun when switching to nechamah (consolation) about the future redemption at Lo Seivoshi. However, in that minhag, they switched back to the original tune for the last verse, Bo'i Beshalom, which -- like the opening ...


15

Likely based on "לעולם יקדים אדם דבר הקל ומאחר הכבד" (from רמב״ם הלכות דעות פרק ד‎, q.v.).


14

Moreshet.co.il reports: אך האריז"ל הנהיג להוסיף שלשה פסוקים ראשונים ממזמור צ"ה, "לכו נרננה" וכו', כדי לא לסיים בפורענות - "יצמיתם ה' אלקינו", כעין מה שאמרו חז"ל לגבי הפסקה בקריאת התורה: "ואין מפסיקין בקללות", וכן נוהגים בסיום הקריאה של מגילת איכה, שאחרי הפסוק האחרון "כי אם מאס מאתנו" וכו', חוזרים על הפסוק שלפניו: "השיבנו ה' אליך" וכוו, כדי לא ...


13

According to R' Ari Enkin, writing on Hirhurim: Although there is a widespread custom to change the tune during Lecha Dodi when reaching the stanza of "Lo Tevoshi", it is actually quite unclear where this custom derives from. Some sources even suggest that it is baseless and evolved without reason. I recommend that you read the whole piece and see what ...


13

This is a piyut (liturgical poem) that was composed a few hundred years ago in Tzfat. The chorus does not contain the name of God, nor is this a davar shbikedusha (a prayer that can only be recited in the presence of a minyan - 10 men). There is no problem with repeating the chorus.


13

Per Rabbi Aaron Gamliel in the Sefer Matei Aharon, the words Yitzchok & Rivka = Tefila (יצחק רבקה" בגימטריא "תפלה") and per the Raya Mehemna Zohar Chadash Vol 3, page 223:1 & page 253:1 the Shechina is also called Tefila since the whole purpose of Tefila is to connect to Hashem, like the name Naftali (נפתולי אלקים נפתלתי). In Bereishis 25:21 it says ...


13

Gemara Berachos 24a : Shmuel says that kol of a women is ervah because of the passuk in shir hashirim 2:14. יד. יוֹנָתִי בְּחַגְוֵי הַסֶּלַע בְּסֵתֶר הַמַּדְרֵגָה הַרְאִינִי אֶת מַרְאַיִךְ הַשְׁמִיעִנִי אֶת קוֹלֵךְ כִּי קוֹלֵךְ עָרֵב וּמַרְאֵיךְ נָאוֶה:‏ My dove, in the clefts of the rock, in the coverture of the steps, show me your appearance, ...


13

You're most likely looking for Oifen Pripitchik. See it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkS3cZntDTY The lyrics are brought in the WikiPedia article in both Yiddish and English Translation.


12

Here's something I wrote about to answer this question a couple of years ago: If one reads only the text of the Megillah without any awareness of the talmudic materials on it or the history surrounding it, Achashveirosh seems like a pretty neutral king. However, having been the one personally responsible for the halting of the building of the Beis ...


12

I'm not sure this completly answers your question but it is mentioned in Talmud, Soferim 20:6. http://www.virtualjerusalem.com/holidays/chanukah/maozhan.htm


12

I was a little boy at home when my father Yigal Calek ny"v composed Mareh Cohen - there's a very interesting 'composer's inspiration' story to go with it too... Anyway, so yes, pretty much "at the source" ;)


11

If there are three people who recite the Hallel together, the two responsive readings (the four verses ending "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" at the beginning of Psalm 118 and the four "Ana Hashem" verses toward the end of that psalm) are recited as in the Shul: the leader recites each of the "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" verses and the others answer "Hodu" [and the next verse ...


11

The source for the statement that it's disrespectful is Taz, Orach Chaim 621:2 (and from there in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 6:3). He writes: ועוד יש ללמוד מדברים הנזכרים כאן דבמקום שאין אנו רוצים להזכיר שם של אדנות י"ל השם, ולא כמ"ש המון עם אדושם, כי אין זה דרך כבוד של מעלה, אלא י"ל כלשון התנא השם So it sounds like he's saying that the only ...


11

There is a Kabbalistic idea that fish (which live in the water, representing עלמא דאתכסיא, the hidden realm) is on a higher spiritual level than meat (which represent עלמא דאתגליא, the visible world). We thus start with eating fish, thereby giving us the power to afterwards extract the "sparks of holiness" from the meat. (Likkutei Torah of R' Shneur Zalman ...


11

Rav Ovadia Yosef (Torat HaTahara 12:54, Taharat HaBayit vol 2 pp. 167-170) permits it.


11

The source is Psalms 119:92 - לוּלֵי תוֹרָתְךָ שַׁעֲשֻׁעָי אָז אָבַדְתִּי בְעָנְיִי Or, in the JPS translation - Unless Thy law had been my delight, I should then have perished in mine affliction.


10

As I understand it, Charvonah is the linchpin of the Megilah, the meeting of two separate plots. Without Charvonah, Mordechai's rescue of King Achashverosh ends with his pony ride around Shushan. And without Charvonah, Esther's plea for her nation might have fallen on deaf ears; Achashverosh might well have decided to side with his chief advisor, who had ...


10

The g'mara in B'rachos (4B) explains that 'נ' represents downfall [of the nation] and is therefore encompassed in the positive context of the putative next pasuk, which states that "God supports all of the fallen".


10

I've heard various versions of the larger-than-life tale you're referencing (including one in which the antagonist dies simultaneously of stoning, burning, decapitation, and strangulation). Gershon referenced one such version in print, which is translated below. As to the Shavuot connection, Akdamut is about the greatness of G-d and the heavenly spheres; it ...


10

I once heard an answer as follows: The Torah was given on Shabbos, so the first extension of Shabbos was the מאחרים לצאת they did that evening. It was only the following week that they fulfilled ממהרים לבא. A similar answer is that at the time the song is being sung, it is already Shabbos, so the next event that will occur is מאחרים לצאת, not ממהרים לבא. ...


10

The custom to recite Haneirois Halalu is kept by all but a few Yemenite communities and those following the custom of the Italian Jews (Siddur Rema). The first Source for its recitation is Maseches Sofrim (see article about its own author) Ch.20 Pr.36 in the Hager Edition. (This is apparently the version that was available to the earlier Poskim.) I quote the ...


10

This article has a writeup on the subject, speculating that it was written no later than about 500 CE (i.e., during the Talmudic era), based on its style. Machzor Vitry in fact places it earlier, tracing it to the Anshei Knesses Hagedolah. Still other sources attribute it to R. Asher Halevi of Worms (late 11th-early 12th century). As for why it's said: ...


10

Per Rabbi Shimon Eider's Sefer Hilchos Nidah one should "refrain from listening to his wife's singing when she is a Niddah."


9

After a bit more searching, it looks like Yigal Calek of the London School of Jewish Song may be the original composer as late as 1971.


9

Here is a link to Shiras Moshe which contains the poems of the Chasam Sofer.


9

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


8

The translations I have seen translate it differently, and effectively elide the vav; either קניניו refers to the rest of Haman's household, or to the fact that his sons were his dearest possessions. From Koren/Sacks: His many sons and his household You hanged on the gallows. From Artscroll: His numerous progeny -- his possessions -- on the ...


8

Machatzit Hashekel Siman 262: We don't know when they are going to leave. So we ask them to bless us whenever they decide to leave. Similar to "Blessed are you when coming and blessed when leaving". Avnei Nezer: Shalom Aleichem we say to the Malhachei Hashabat that "came" with us from Shul and Tsetchem Leshalom we say to the Malhacei Hachol (Mundane? ...



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