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10

According to Wikipedia "Baruch Tehiye" is an acceptable response, but "Chazak Ve'Ematz" is the common one. Among Morrocans it would be "Kulchem Beruchim".


9

In Mishnah Makkot 1:10 there is a famous passage where, after discussing the laws of witnesses, the Rabbis debate how often the Sanhedrin should order the capital punishment. A Sanhedrin that would execute somebody once every seven years would be considered a violent Beit Din. Rabbi Elazar Ben Azariah says: "Once every 70 years." Rabbi Tarfon and ...


8

If all you're having is borei nefashot foods, it's probably not necessary to do anything different. Say the bracha rishonah quietly before you take a bite, and a borei nefashot at the end. It's not that long. If you have to make an al hamichya, i would just tell them, "i'll be with you in a second, i just have to say a short grace after eating." As Double ...


8

You could call him "cousin". That could be a nice way to emphasize the relationship between Jews and Muslims as descendents of Abraham. "Friend" would also be appropriate. I'm not exactly sure about Muslim protocol, but for Jews, it is not necessary to use a word for him, and as havarka says, you could simply call him by his first name or Mr. Last Name, ...


6

Generally, Orthodox families do not make a huge fuss with Bnot Mitzvah ("B'not being the plural of "Bat") - at least not on the same level as a Bar Mitzvah. That means, that there is usually no festivity done in a synagogue. (Within the past decade or so, that has been changing very slightly, as some Modern Orthodox have started doing at least some small ...


3

what about his name?! That sounds like appropriate! or Believer!


3

Personally I think that besides for the objective of most accurately conveying the facts there are two considerations. A) Inculcating and maintaining a healthy respect for Jewish works, including rabbinic ones. B) Inculcating and maintaining a willingness to think and question. The former may scare us from telling an impressionable youth that something in ...


3

The custom to respond to a greeting/wish-for-peace by giving some additional blessing - and expressing that additional blessing by 'doubling' the received wish - seems to go back at least to the times of the gemara: see Gitin 62a, where it talks about greeting gentiles working the land during shmita, and refers to "doubling" the "Shalom." (Apparently the ...


2

In the Sefer שאלת רב which is questions that were asked of R' Chaim Kanievsky, he was asked this specific question and ruled that in a letter to a non-Jew it should not be written. (שאלת רב, חלק א' פרק כ"ב אות ז - no link available): ז. המנהג לכתוב בכל איגרת בס"ד ובימי בין המצרים על נחמת ציון וכו" ובאלול אני לדודי וכו' מהו כשכותב אגרת לנכרי תשובה ...


2

The Or Hachayim on Vayikra 19:3 quoted by @Fred provides a kabbalistic explanation: ואת שבתותי תשמרו... ואמרו בזוהר חדש (ריש פ' תולדות) כי יום שבת הוא כנגד יוסף הצדיק, והוא סוד השלום ולזה אנו אומרים שבת שלום ואנו מברכין הפורס סכת שלום Translation: "And guard My Sabbaths" (Vayikra 19:3)... And it says in the Zohar Chadash (beginning of Toldot) that ...


2

Can you call him "achi"? That means "my brother" in Hebrew. I don't know if that would be acceptable under your religious beliefs (as it isn't in Arabic), but that might work. You could also consider calling him "yedidi" which means my friend in Hebrew. Or you might try "gadol" which can mean something along the lines of "big man" or significant ...


1

In my Sefardic Kehilla the common responses are "ברוך תיהיה" and "ברוכים תהיה"


1

In my experience the Shuls that are expecting a donation make a special Mi Shebeirach after the Mi Shebeirach of the Aliya. Ultimately those that do not want to or can not afford to donate say Tziva Lvarcham.



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