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14

While I'm accustomed to "gut voch" or "gut (gebentched) yar," I noticed that the "מחזור המפורש" (Gefen, Jerusalem 5772 [Ashkenaz, page 999]) indicates that a regular yom tov greeting (either "gut yom tov" or "chag sameach," I guess) should be used. וז"ל: ופוקדין איש את רעהו לשלום כדרך שאומרים בכניסת יו"ט.‏ One person actually did wish me a "good ...


12

In addition to "good yom tov" and "good year" (or the Yiddish or Hebrew equivalents) mentioned in other answers, I've heard "a gutn kvitl" or the equivalent "piska tava", meaning "a good note", referring to the judgement sealed on Yom Kippur and delivered on Hoshana Rabbah.


10

According to Wikipedia "Baruch Tehiye" is an acceptable response, but "Chazak Ve'Ematz" is the common one. Among Morrocans it would be "Kulchem Beruchim".


9

If all you're having is borei nefashot foods, it's probably not necessary to do anything different. Say the bracha rishonah quietly before you take a bite, and a borei nefashot at the end. It's not that long. If you have to make an al hamichya, i would just tell them, "i'll be with you in a second, i just have to say a short grace after eating." As Double ...


6

Generally, Orthodox families do not make a huge fuss with Bnot Mitzvah ("B'not being the plural of "Bat") - at least not on the same level as a Bar Mitzvah. That means, that there is usually no festivity done in a synagogue. (Within the past decade or so, that has been changing very slightly, as some Modern Orthodox have started doing at least some small ...


6

In addition to "gut yor", I believe I've heard "gmar tov" till Hoshana Rabba.


6

I will give you my opinion as young woman. I think you should not comment her dressing at all whether she dresses modestly or not. You should try to not even look at woman in that way. If a woman in not modestly dressed, other women from community should instruct her how to dress. If she is modestly dressed than she will not receive such comments and she ...


5

I work in an all-women's religious workplace, but we certainly have visitors who come from different backgrounds than we do. Sometimes, we visit them, too. From where I sit, complimenting a woman on the way she behaves in any way other than strictly professional ("That was a really helpful comment, thank you."/"The project is right on time, keep it up.") is ...


4

Well, Yom Kippur is over for 5776. But the most common greeting is G'mar Chatimah Tova, meaning literally "A good finish of the sealing." The concept is similar to what is said as part of the Unetaneh Tokef poem, which is one of the highlights of the High Holiday Musaph services. In it, it says, "On Rosh Hashanna it is written, and on Yom Kippur, it is ...


3

The custom to respond to a greeting/wish-for-peace by giving some additional blessing - and expressing that additional blessing by 'doubling' the received wish - seems to go back at least to the times of the gemara: see Gitin 62a, where it talks about greeting gentiles working the land during shmita, and refers to "doubling" the "Shalom." (Apparently the ...


3

I am hesitant because I am not sure this is the right forum for your question or that we can offer a properly sourced answer but until one of those two questions are answered I will suggest the following: Insofar as it was typical under most circumstances to refer to someone as the son of their father, the deviation from this norm would likely raise ...


2

In addition to "g'mar chasima tova"[1] mentioned by DanF, I've often heard "good yom tov". I often hear them in combination, actually: "good yom tov; g'mar chasima tova". [1] It is worth noting that Chabad-Lubavitch folks wish "a chasima and a g'mar chasima tova" — I think until n'ila.


2

In the Sefer שאלת רב which is questions that were asked of R' Chaim Kanievsky, he was asked this specific question and ruled that in a letter to a non-Jew it should not be written. (שאלת רב, חלק א' פרק כ"ב אות ז - no link available): ז. המנהג לכתוב בכל איגרת בס"ד ובימי בין המצרים על נחמת ציון וכו" ובאלול אני לדודי וכו' מהו כשכותב אגרת לנכרי תשובה ...


2

A common response (to men) in Israel is "Wekhen LeMar" (וכן למר) meaning "and the same to you, Sir". If so, the proper response to women would probably be "Wekhen LeMarat" (וכן למרת) meaning "and the same to you, Madam".


2

Congratulations on your willingness to take on a challenging mitzvah at a young age. There is an actual halachic question here which I think people have missed. You want to know how to balance tznius laws with the laws about respecting parents, etc., when your family is embarrassed by how you dress. Although I have seen some sources suggest that Rabbinical ...


2

To the bride and groom, commonly I have heard (and given) the blessing: "May you be zocheh to build a bayis ne'eman b'Yisrael!" To the attendees (from the bride and groom), if they aren't married and are of marriageable age, it is common to give them a blessing to find their mate. If they are married, I haven't really heard any "standard" blessing. To the ...


1

Seriously, the best blessings to give the newborn as well as the parents are already in the Siddur and are said as part of the Brit Milah ceremony. What blessing can be better than saying: כשם שנכנס לברית כן יכנס לתורה ולחופה ולמעשים טובים In the manner that he entered the brit, so shall he enter for Torah (learning and knowledge) the chuppah and the ...


1

my 2 cents... I encourage the common "צום מועיל" = "tzom mo eel" = may your fast be useful. by the book, This wish that your fast will be accepted by god... but I like to take it as a greeting for the fast be useful to yourself...


1

In my Sefardic Kehilla the common responses are "ברוך תיהיה" and "ברוכים תהיה"



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