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8

This is sort of an argument from absence, but... Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 8:16) describes a case where a person sleeps at night wearing his tallis, as to whether he has to recite a berachah on it the next morning. If there were indeed any problem with what parts of the body the tzitzis strings touch, then I would think this would be a logical place for ...


8

Taamei Haminhagim (citing Machazeh Avraham, by R. Avraham of Buczacz) says that it is because the ushpiza for the seventh day of Sukkos is King David, and he used to stay up all night studying Torah - so we do the same to evoke his corresponding Divine attribute. R. Chaim Vital (Pri Eitz Chayim and Shaar Hakavanos, cited in Nitei Gavriel) give a different ...


8

The Mishna Berura (2:11) quoted in the linked article brings from the Shaloh Hakadosh that while not required by the strict letter of the law it is considered "midas chassidus" (pious behavior) to cover one's head while sleeping.


6

Maybe the reason to fall asleep specifically through the process of drinking wine is to remember the miracle which was done through wine at the different wine parties in the Book of Esther as outlined here: Can you use Liquor to fulfill Ad Dlo Yoda? EDIT: I challenge your assumption that the two rules are separated. The Rambam writes in Megillah 2:15: ...


6

In SHU"T SHOEL UMASHIV he answers that according to the MORDECHAI only when a garment is worn in a way of clothing (DERECH LIVISHA) is one obligated in Tzitzis. The SHUT of the MARSHAM adds that Tzitzis are meant to surround one on four sides so you could see them when looking in every one of the 4 directions. A blanket does not have that, which might be ...


6

I heard this from Rav Shmuel Eliyahu: Dina D'malchuta Dina is limited to laws that are: Enforced in practice by the government, Apply equally to all citizens, and do not contradict Torah. Even if a consumer of a mattress were forbidden by law to remove the label there would have to be some kind actual enforcement of that law to bring it ...


6

As I see it, this question must be divided into two separate issues: How does standing by while another person is in pain affect you, your soul and middot? How does the Jewish tradition view allowing a child to CIO (Cry It Out) from the perspective of the child? ie. Does anyone discuss how this activity may affect the child in the long run? Let's start ...


6

2 potential answers, neither of which has been researched. First, psychological: Achashverosh didn't want to owe anyone anything. He didn't actually care about Mordechai or his people; he cared about his record (the potentially public knowledge that he doesn't repay his debts). Second, textual: As far as I can tell, Haman never identifies his ...


6

The sefer "Zikaron L'Moshe" (pg. 65) writes that the Chasam Sofer originally understood that the reason one must wait six hours after meat, is because that is how long it takes to digest the food, and therefore this only applies to one who ate a meal in the day. However, when one sleeps the food digests quicker, and he may eat milk even before six hours are ...


5

The minhag to say Hamapil at the end is so the beracha is semucha to (just before) sleep. That is that there should be no hefsek (break) between the beracha and falling asleep. The minhag held by the Gra and other achronim is to day Hamapil first. They reason that the psukim said afterwards are not considered a hefsek. I am basing what I wrote on Siddur ...


5

From the link above (emphasis added): It is forbidden to store [raw or cooked] food or drinks(23) under a bed [even if the food is wrapped and sealed in metal containers or in a suitcase] in which someone will sleep.(24) But if, inadvertently, food or drink was stored under a bed and someone slept on the bed, many poskim hold that the food does not ...


5

It is permitted to place food underneath a bench, even if the bench is used for sleeping, since a bench is not a bed. [It is recommended that food not be placed under an airplane seat, since airplane seats are regularly used as beds Kuntress U'vlechtecha Baderech 4:2 and note 30, quoting contemporary poskim. http://torahsearch.com/page.cfm/2930


5

Per the following health websites - sleeping on the left side avoids heartburn http://www.ehow.com/way_5206251_sleeping-positions-better-digestion.html http://www.livestrong.com/article/69972-sleeping-positions-better-digestion/ The Rambam in Hilchos Deios Perek 4 Halacha 5 also mentions to start off sleeping on the left and then switch over to the right. ...


5

One may not inflate a mattress for the first time on Shabbos, as this would violate makeh b'patish. However, one may inflate or reinflate a mattress on Shabbos as long as it is not the first time the mattress was inflated, since deflating a mattress that is not being used is the standard mode of use. Therefore, the mattress is not considered broken when it ...


4

Radak (to v. 8) explains simply: one or two times it might indeed have been Shmuel's imagination (thinking in his sleep that someone was calling him), but three times means that Shmuel really had heard something. Since no one else was there except Eli and Shmuel, Eli understood that it must be a Divine voice. He also quotes Ibn Ezra, who says that it's ...


4

The Mitzvah isn't to pass out or even to space out. The Mitzvah is one of Simhah. The Gemara, in my opinion, is simply saying that the revelry ought to be great. Asked to quantify it, it just went for the most extreme. I think it is, essentially, a license to get totally hammered. Not as a Mitzvah in and of itself, but rather as a function, or a measure, of ...


4

I'll go you one better - if the purpose is to not know the difference between "arur Haman" and *"baruch Mordechai", why bother drinking or sleeping at all? Of course, I'm not referring to the highly intelligent community that patronizes this site, but do you really think that most of the rest of us really know the difference while we're sober? This is ...


4

The Rebbe actually addressed this question in a letter dated 7 Cheshvan, 5715 [1954]: Re Sleeping in the Succah In order to safeguard and inspire a greater feeling toward the Succah, sleeping in it is not practiced by us. The basis for this is two-fold: First, we have a rule that Hamitztaer putter min HaSuccah (suffering exempts one from dwelling ...


4

See Yeshiva.org here (under heading תיקון ליל שבועות, number 15 [טו]): לימוד נשים - נשים אינן חייבות בתיקון ליל שבועות, ואם הן באות ולומדות תנ"ך וכד' תבוא עליהן ברכה (שו"ת רב פעלים א, או"ח סוד ישרים, סי' ט). And here (second paragraph under heading "staying up at night") Responsa Rav Pa’alim (Sod Yesharim 9) points out that for mystical reasons ...


4

As stated, in the mattress example, that tag is there to prevent mattress manufacturers from putting all sorts of awful stuff in their mattresses and consumers not knowing. Once you've read the "ingredients label" and have bought the mattress, you can do whatever you want with it. (Well if you go to sell it to someone else it gets tricky ...) So rip away! ...


4

Simple answer no. Complex answer, there is a mahloket as to exactly why we wash our hands in the morning. Some hold that is is because we have touched an unclean part of the body, some hold that is is because of a ruah ra that rests upon a person while they are asleep, some hold that is not a ruah ra but rather klipot or hiztoniut that rest upon a person ...


4

Kitzur Shulcah Aruch 17:1 says of the Sh'ma: After a third of the day has passed, one should recite the Shema alone, without the blessings, because it is forbidden to recite the blessings beyond this time. The Shema itself, though, may be recited the entire day. (Other authorities also allow the recitation of the blessings throughout the day.) A ...


4

The Rama (Orach Chayim 583:2) says that some have the practice not to sleep on Rosh HaShanah, and it is a correct practice. The Taz (3) quotes the source of this: The Yerushalmi which says "Whoever sleeps on Rosh HaShanah, his luck sleeps." The Magen Avraham (6) quotes the Arizal, that it is permissible to sleep after midday, since the angel (of "luck," I ...


4

Shulchan Aruch Harav Siman 639: (See especially the last sentence of 9, and note that 10 doesn't really apply today since we no longer celebrate this way. But I included it since it's instructive.) 9) At present, people at large have adopted the practice of following a lenient approach when it comes to sleeping [in the sukkah). Only those who are ...


4

Both the Tur and Shulchan Aruch Harav use the word צריך which seems like its an obligation. However see Mishmeres Sholom and Pischei Teshuva (and see Mishna Berura S"K 9) who explain that many G-d fearing Jews are not strict about this nowdays because our sleeping habits have changed since the time of Shulchan Aruch and we no longer go to sleep as early and ...


4

Pesahim 120b uses the phrase נים ולא נים תיר ולא תיר‏, 'dozing but not dozing, awake but not awake' to describe a minimum amount of halachic consciousness required to be considered not sleeping. The Talmud explains that in this state, a person responds, but cannot assert something independently. However, if reminded of something specifically, they can ...


4

Short answer: no, it's not a formal prohibition, but it's still wrong to prevent someone from sleeping. From http://www.dinonline.org/2013/11/05/gezel-sheina-stealing-sleep/ The sefer “Ve-Ahavta Le-Re’acha Kamocha” notes that Rav Chaim of Brisk used the expression “gezel sheina,” implying that waking somebody up needlessly is a form of theft. ...


3

\2. Does he mean to imply that if someone falls asleep on his left side, then his body will shift during the night and he'll wind up on his right? ... If not, then how does he expect us to lie on the right after our food digests? A well-respected rabbi once explained to me that this is intended to be prescriptive, not descriptive. As a result, he ...


3

Rabbi Noach Orlowek in his book on parenting, My Child My Disciple, says that it is forbidden to let a child cry, because it will affect his Emunah - he will learn that no one answers you when you cry. In a private conversation (which will remain private by leaving out information), the Mashgiach of a well-known Yeshiva, upon hearing this, said "When my son ...



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