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7

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? ...


5

The Kesef Mishna (Shechita 1:3) writes: וא"ת סוף סוף נימא דבעו אסיפה בעודם חיים. וי"ל שאילו היה אפשר לומר כן אה"נ אבל כיון דא"א לאכלם בלא אסיפה שאפילו קלטן בפיו ולא אספם בידו מ"מ בעת שהם בפיו נאספים הם אם כן אינו דבר מיוחד דמזהר עליה קרא And if you want to say that in the end of the day we should say that it requires gathering while it is alive, one ...


4

I don't really know what the situation in other countries in, but for a very long time, the only meat sold in stores in America has been soaked and salted. Even if a kosher-labelled piece of meat has not been salted properly, it's בטל ברוב, as the overwhelming majority of meat is completely kosher. ...you used the word "treyf," by which you probably meant ...


4

The last Taz in Y.D. siman 18, based on the Rash, writes that even though a Talmid Chochom is generally believed to paskin for himself, he is not believed when there is a chezkas issur, a previous status of prohibition. The animal was prohibited to eat while it was alive, and therefore the shochet is not relied upon to paskin for himself in this situation. ...


4

No, a wire would not be a good shechita knife, because when it's cutting, it goes entirely under the neck, which is a problem of חלדה, "tunneling." חלדה is one of the five main halachos of shechita. See שמלה חדשה 24:9 et seqq for more info. To borrow an illustration of חלדה from a previous answer of mine, this is not חלדה, but if the circled area goes under ...


3

While the talmudic passage quoted above is certainly relevant in this case, I don't think that it is necessary to even resort to such a source in this case. According to it's own interpretive methodology, the question was flawed from the beginning. The question was why the pasuq in Shemoth 21:28 needed to state "wa-lo ye'okhel eth besaro - and its meat ...


3

It appears a lot in mishnayoss. E.G. Bava Kama (7,5) הַנּוֹחֵר, וְהַמְעַקֵּר, מְשַׁלֵּם תַּשְׁלוּמֵי כֶפֶל וְאֵינוֹ מְשַׁלֵּם תַּשְׁלוּמֵי אַרְבָּעָה וַחֲמִשָּׁה The noher ... do not be considered as shohet, and so do not pay X4 or X5 The Bartenura wrote: הַנּוֹחֵר. קוֹרְעוֹ מִנְּחִירָיו עַד לִבּוֹ He tore from the nostrils to the heart This also appears ...


3

I think the sense contextually is that he tears it from its nostrils to its chest (see Rashi Chullin 17a s.v. v'hanocher [hattip @wfb]) or stabs it (see e.g. Krithuth 5:1) or strangles it in such a manner that it is clearly not a kosher shechita. See e.g. this Wiktionary entry. See also Chullin 17a.


3

For your first question about needing to be told that the bull cannot be eaten, see this answer. Your other question is asks why we care about ownership; we care because there are uses for the carcass besides food. An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They ...


2

Drisa is the problem that comes to mind. A sharp object that cuts by slicing when moved across the animals neck is allowed. Drisa is cutting through pressure applied in a downward force. Using a cheese cutter or the like would render the animal a niveila. Unfit to eat and Tamei.


2


2

Certification for shechitah is known as a "kabalah", not (directly) related to "Jewish mysticism." I recall seeing a sign advertising lessons that would culminate in an exam/certification from either Rabbi Yisroel Belsky in Brooklyn (who is on OU Kosher's policy panel), or a name in Lakewood I'm afraid I didn't recognize. At least that's one name for you ...


1

Not if there aren't substantial numbers of bnei pakuah- we can apply 'rov.'


1

While I have not seen a reference to man returning, the halachos of meat would still not apply even if the man did return. Note also that the man only fell when Bnei Yisrael were camped around the mishkan in the desert. When Mashiach comes, we will be living in all of Eretz Yisrael and not in the immediate vicinity of the Bais Hamikdash. Rav Hirsch on verse ...



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