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14

You don't need a special knife for shechitah, though it's recommended. The Simlah Chadasha (18:16) says that, in order to have a fallback option in case one's knife is lost before he could check it after (and didn't check it before), he can rely on the fact that his special knife (that was put away, and is never used for anything else) is probably free from ...


13

Normative halacha (שלחן ערוך סימן ב, and שמלה חדשה ב) both state unequivocally that the שחיטה of a non-Jew is forbidden on the biblical level. See here for why I care so much about the Simla Chadasha. HOWEVER, the opinion of the Rambam (mentioned in other answers, הלכות שחיטה in 4:11-12) is that this is only a rabbinic enactment for certain types of ...


11

The lechatchila age minimum, according to Simlah Chadasha (1:30), is 18 years old, because at that point a person is a "בר דעת" and knows how to be careful with things. This minimum can be bypassed if a person is an exceptional ירא שמים, and is considered to be a גדול (adult; see footnote for technical definition). What would happen if a minor* slaughtered? ...


11

Simla Chadasha (the book on shechita) rules (11:1) that one should not shecht in the dark/at night, because he won't be able to look at the simanim, to check whether he did what he needed to do (רוב אחד בעוף רוב שנים בבהמה; most of one "siman" (windpipe/foodpipe) for a bird, most of two "simanim" for an animal). "Dark" is defined as "too dark to see what ...


10

This practice is also brought down by Simla Chadasha (11:10); see the מטה אשר there (12) who brings from the פלתי that this practice is from ר' יהודה החסיד and was only a concern then, because in his time there were many who practiced כישוף (magic) on geese, but is now no longer a concern. אין להקפיד ע"ז, כי אז בימי ר"י החסיד היה הזמן גורם, כי רבו אז ...


8

Midina d'Gemara, shochtim do not need to be certified. In halacha, we may assume like 'rov,' and in shechita, the rule is that 'rov metzuyim etzel shechita,' that most people who claim to know how to slaughter indeed know how to and may be relied upon. See Simlah Chadasha 1:4-5. However, in the times of the Rishonim, there were many fraudsters who took ...


8

In America, the custom is as the custom of Europe -- to use the sefer שמלה חדשה, written by Rabbi Alexander Sender Schor (1673-1737), even though on occasion he will disagree with the שלחן ערוך. Rabbi Schor also wrote תבואת שור (an explanation to Simlah Chadasha) and בכור שור, a commentary on Shas. (see מטה אשר [commentary to שמלה חדשה] in 1:4, especially ...


8

See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


7

By way of background, I am a Karaite Jew (from an actual Karaite family). I run a Karaite Jewish blog (ABlueThread.com); and I actually have an entire article on this topic. See my post here: http://wp.me/p43Sek-sm And here is an explanatory video: http://youtu.be/gARsacJ5oWs?t=2m To Summarize: Karaites require completely cutting of all four signs (two ...


6

There is a bracha on shechita, here is the wording: ברוך אתה ה' אלוקינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וציוונו על השחיטה ~ SA YD 19:1 (see also Simlah Chadashah at 19:1) Rambam writes (Hil. Brachos 11:12) that if one slaughters his own קרבן פסח (Pesach offering), he makes a different bracha: אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וציוונו לשחוט ( h/t DoubleAA for ...


6

I don't know if this is the only time that we learn halacha for shechita from the Binding of Isaac, but according to the Simlah Chadasha (6:5), we learn that the shechita knife must be unattached from the ground in order to be eligible to use for shechita, from the Akeidah. His source (ultimately), is the gemara, Chulin 16a: יתיב רב אחוריה דרבי חייא ...


5

I don't have the full answer, but here's a piece of it. Simla Chadasha writes (18:12) that on erev Yom Kippur, when everyone comes with their kapparos, and if the knife would be checked after every שחיטה (like it should be), it might not be checked with the utmost concentration, there is an allowance to check the knife every set of birds (so that nothing ...


5

Yes there are many differences. Jews are allowed to eat pieces taken from the animal immediately after shechita is performed, even while the animal is still moving מפרכס (blood must still be removed -- which is harder to do compared to regular meat, because it was taken alive-ish). Shechita kills the animal, even if it is still convulsing. (Simla Chadasha ...


4

As the other answers stated, the main difference between נבילה וטריפה is the טומאה. However, there are also other differences, such as אותו ואת בנו (see שמלה חדשה טו); in שלחן ערוך פב where ביצת טריפה is אסור but ביצת נבילה is not; and (lamely) someone who makes a vow נדר not to benefit from one but left the other alone. These are found all over שמלה חדשה ...


4

As Ze'ev mentioned in his answer, Simlah Chadashah says (1:36) that an older person should not shecht, due to the practical limitations that accompany old age, such as shaky hands and weaker eyesight. The Mordechai at the beginning of Chullin quotes Eldad HaDani in his הלכות ארץ ישראל (Hebrewbooks link I did not find exactly where in that book this הלכה is ...


4

Yes and no. Surprisingly, Simlah Chadasha says (siman 7) that you may slaughter with a knife that is attached to a wheel (though only b'dieved, because of a wheel that is not כח אדם; and because it's difficult to do correctly). However, restrictions apply: The machine has to be human-powered, specifically by a Jew (think handcrank); or water-powered, ...


4

From an answer to the linked question: If you buy certified kosher meat then they have already removed the relevant Chelev or are selling you meat from a part of the animal in which no Chelev can be found. The vast majority of Shochtim in the United States do not remove the Chelev because it is too time consuming (not because they don't know how). ...


4

The simplest explanation for this concept is "Like a blind man (finding) in a trap door (in an attic)" To expand on that: much like a blind man cannot find his way out of a room without help*, and if he did it by himself it was just pure luck, so too are these שחיטות that came out good -- you can't use these to prove that someone who doesn't know הלכות ...


4

According to the source in this answer to that question, Rabbi Menachem Genack of the OU had been quoted as saying The tissue samples would have to come from an animal that had been slaughtered according to kosher rules


4

The last Taz in Y.D. siman 18, based on the Rash, writes that even though a Talmid Chochom is generally believed to paskin for himself, he is not believed when there is a chezkas issur, a previous status of prohibition. The animal was prohibited to eat while it was alive, and therefore the shochet is not relied upon to paskin for himself in this situation. ...


4

I don't really know what the situation in other countries in, but for a very long time, the only meat sold in stores in America has been soaked and salted. Even if a kosher-labelled piece of meat has not been salted properly, it's בטל ברוב, as the overwhelming majority of meat is completely kosher. ...you used the word "treyf," by which you probably meant ...


3

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba, ...


3

Generally the answer is no. This came up in the 1930s in Germany, where the laws were demanding that animals be stunned before slaughter. Rabbi Yechiel Yaakov Weinberg wrote on the subject at length and corresponded with many great authorities, but at the end of the day Rabbi Chaim Ozer Grozinski put his foot down that the practical answer was "no." Rabbi ...


3

In Hulin, Daf מו עמ' ב. The concept is perhaps not what you think it is. It is one of the Triefos, a hole in the lungs (called Sircha), which some Poskim (like Rashi) say that if you find some scar in the lung, you need to check if there is a hole, and others say that the scar indicates a hole no matter our further observations find, and the meat is Trief. ...


3

I can't source this, but I would imagine that it would depend on whether or not the person holding the animal jumped -- see שמלה חדשה at 23:6, where he says that even where the שוחט cut his own finger, we are only worried where he noticed the cut before he finished שחיטה, and then only when he jumped. As to the person holding the animal, he needs to hold it ...


2

Simlah Chadashah says that someone who is as drunk as Lot is the same as the שוטה. He also adds that someone who is not quite that drunk yet may not slaughter ab initio, but if he did and it is certain (if he says he is certain or someone was observing him) that there was no דרסה (undue pressure in שחיטה) then it is allowed. A city שוחט should not be drunk ...


2

The Kashau Rebbe was opposed to the practice of factory kashrus in America, and himself would not eat meat unless he knew the shochet and saw the animal itself schected with his own eyes. His Hasidim today do not eat beef from anyone, though they eat poultry sometimes because chelev, which one is chayiv kareis for with domesticated meat, is not an issue ...


2

This is not a definitive answer or the final word but I will translate a responsa from Rav Yosef Eliyahu Henkin printed in chelek 2 of Kisvei haGria Henkin page 50. 'I have postponed responding about stunning with electricity because being far away it's hard to get clarity, and especially as it seems all is not known about this. But, some time ago it was ...


2

Just to clarify @Shokhet's answer - there is no lower age limit, as long as the child can slaughter and he is being supervised. This is found in Shulchan Aruch 1:5. The Rema there comments that there are those who are machmir not to give a kabala for shchita to someone under 18, just like the Simlah Chadasha says. The Shulchan Aruch's language is "יודע לאמן ...


2

No, the meat would not be forbidden if the blessing was skipped, in most cases. The blessing need not be repeated if it was skipped. See Simla Chadasha (19:1), who writes: ואי לית ליה לא יברך אחר השחיטה אפילו תוך כדי דיבור דכיון דראוי היה לברך קודם ודחי נפשיה הואיל ואדחי אדחי אבל השחיטה כשרה אפילו לעצמו ואפילו הזיד ולא בירך ומ״מ אם רואים שהעם פרוצים ...



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