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14

You don't need a special knife for shechitah, though it's recommended. The Simlah Chadasha (18:16) says that, in order to have a fallback option in case one's knife is lost before he could check it after (and didn't check it before), he can rely on the fact that his special knife (that was put away, and is never used for anything else) is probably free from ...


11

Simla Chadasha (the book on shechita) rules (11:1) that one should not shecht in the dark/at night, because he won't be able to look at the simanim, to check whether he did what he needed to do (רוב אחד בעוף רוב שנים בבהמה; most of one "siman" (windpipe/foodpipe) for a bird, most of two "simanim" for an animal). "Dark" is defined as "too dark to see what ...


11

The lechatchila age minimum, according to Simlah Chadasha (1:30), is 18 years old, because at that point a person is a "בר דעת" and knows how to be careful with things. This minimum can be bypassed if a person is an exceptional ירא שמים, and is considered to be a גדול (adult; see footnote for technical definition). What would happen if a minor* slaughtered? ...


7

By way of background, I am a Karaite Jew (from an actual Karaite family). I run a Karaite Jewish blog (ABlueThread.com); and I actually have an entire article on this topic. See my post here: http://wp.me/p43Sek-sm And here is an explanatory video: http://youtu.be/gARsacJ5oWs?t=2m To Summarize: Karaites require completely cutting of all four signs (two ...


6

There is a bracha on shechita, here is the wording: ברוך אתה ה' אלוקינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וציוונו על השחיטה ~ SA YD 19:1 (see also Simlah Chadashah at 19:1) Rambam writes (Hil. Brachos 11:12) that if one slaughters his own קרבן פסח (Pesach offering), he makes a different bracha: אשר קדשנו במצוותיו וציוונו לשחוט ( h/t DoubleAA for ...


6

I don't know if this is the only time that we learn halacha for shechita from the Binding of Isaac, but according to the Simlah Chadasha (6:5), we learn that the shechita knife must be unattached from the ground in order to be eligible to use for shechita, from the Akeidah. His source (ultimately), is the gemara, Chulin 16a: יתיב רב אחוריה דרבי חייא ...


6

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? ...


5

The Kesef Mishna (Shechita 1:3) writes: וא"ת סוף סוף נימא דבעו אסיפה בעודם חיים. וי"ל שאילו היה אפשר לומר כן אה"נ אבל כיון דא"א לאכלם בלא אסיפה שאפילו קלטן בפיו ולא אספם בידו מ"מ בעת שהם בפיו נאספים הם אם כן אינו דבר מיוחד דמזהר עליה קרא And if you want to say that in the end of the day we should say that it requires gathering while it is alive, one ...


4

According to the source in this answer to that question, Rabbi Menachem Genack of the OU had been quoted as saying The tissue samples would have to come from an animal that had been slaughtered according to kosher rules


4

The simplest explanation for this concept is "Like a blind man (finding) in a trap door (in an attic)" To expand on that: much like a blind man cannot find his way out of a room without help*, and if he did it by himself it was just pure luck, so too are these שחיטות that came out good -- you can't use these to prove that someone who doesn't know הלכות ...


4

As Ze'ev mentioned in his answer, Simlah Chadashah says (1:36) that an older person should not shecht, due to the practical limitations that accompany old age, such as shaky hands and weaker eyesight. The Mordechai at the beginning of Chullin quotes Eldad HaDani in his הלכות ארץ ישראל (Hebrewbooks link I did not find exactly where in that book this הלכה is ...


4

From an answer to the linked question: If you buy certified kosher meat then they have already removed the relevant Chelev or are selling you meat from a part of the animal in which no Chelev can be found. The vast majority of Shochtim in the United States do not remove the Chelev because it is too time consuming (not because they don't know how). ...


4

I don't really know what the situation in other countries in, but for a very long time, the only meat sold in stores in America has been soaked and salted. Even if a kosher-labelled piece of meat has not been salted properly, it's בטל ברוב, as the overwhelming majority of meat is completely kosher. ...you used the word "treyf," by which you probably meant ...


4

The last Taz in Y.D. siman 18, based on the Rash, writes that even though a Talmid Chochom is generally believed to paskin for himself, he is not believed when there is a chezkas issur, a previous status of prohibition. The animal was prohibited to eat while it was alive, and therefore the shochet is not relied upon to paskin for himself in this situation. ...


3

No, a wire would not be a good shechita knife, because when it's cutting, it goes entirely under the neck, which is a problem of חלדה, "tunneling." חלדה is one of the five main halachos of shechita. See שמלה חדשה 24:9 et seqq for more info. To borrow an illustration of חלדה from a previous answer of mine, this is not חלדה, but if the circled area goes under ...


3

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba, ...


3

Generally the answer is no. This came up in the 1930s in Germany, where the laws were demanding that animals be stunned before slaughter. Rabbi Yechiel Yaakov Weinberg wrote on the subject at length and corresponded with many great authorities, but at the end of the day Rabbi Chaim Ozer Grozinski put his foot down that the practical answer was "no." Rabbi ...


2

This is not a definitive answer or the final word but I will translate a responsa from Rav Yosef Eliyahu Henkin printed in chelek 2 of Kisvei haGria Henkin page 50. 'I have postponed responding about stunning with electricity because being far away it's hard to get clarity, and especially as it seems all is not known about this. But, some time ago it was ...


2

No, the meat would not be forbidden if the blessing was skipped, in most cases. The blessing need not be repeated if it was skipped. See Simla Chadasha (19:1), who writes: ואי לית ליה לא יברך אחר השחיטה אפילו תוך כדי דיבור דכיון דראוי היה לברך קודם ודחי נפשיה הואיל ואדחי אדחי אבל השחיטה כשרה אפילו לעצמו ואפילו הזיד ולא בירך ומ״מ אם רואים שהעם פרוצים ...


2

Just to clarify @Shokhet's answer - there is no lower age limit, as long as the child can slaughter and he is being supervised. This is found in Shulchan Aruch 1:5. The Rema there comments that there are those who are machmir not to give a kabala for shchita to someone under 18, just like the Simlah Chadasha says. The Shulchan Aruch's language is "יודע לאמן ...


2

An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They can also use its hide: Ye shall not eat of any thing that dieth of itself; thou mayest give it unto the stranger that is within thy gates, that he may eat it; or thou mayest sell it unto a foreigner; for thou art ...


2

Certification for shechitah is known as a "kabalah", not (directly) related to "Jewish mysticism." I recall seeing a sign advertising lessons that would culminate in an exam/certification from either Rabbi Yisroel Belsky in Brooklyn (who is on OU Kosher's policy panel), or a name in Lakewood I'm afraid I didn't recognize. At least that's one name for you ...


2

Drisa is the problem that comes to mind. A sharp object that cuts by slicing when moved across the animals neck is allowed. Drisa is cutting through pressure applied in a downward force. Using a cheese cutter or the like would render the animal a niveila. Unfit to eat and Tamei.


1

While the talmudic passage quoted above is certainly relevant in this case, I don't think that it is necessary to even resort to such a source in this case. According to it's own interpretive methodology, the question was flawed from the beginning. The question was why the pasuq in Shemoth 21:28 needed to state "wa-lo ye'okhel eth besaro - and its meat ...


1

Just to add some details - This shaila is actually a machlokes Rishonim. The Hagahos Ashiri (Chullin 1:2) writes that one may recite the bracha (bedieved) after the shchita as well. This applies only to birkos hamitzvos and not birkos hanehenin. The Rambam (Hilchos Brachos 11) argues and says that even regarding mitzvos one cannot recite the bracha after ...


1

what will stop you (what is the possible transgression?), but if you want to eat it the possible problems are, the chemicals that you put in the animal are not healthy (i heard it is recommended to wait a few days for them to leave the body), i found on google when you shoot it with a needle you need to be careful not to puncture the organs which become ...


1

Seems like the reason is that it may cause it to actually be dying or it may cause internal damage while shekhita thus turning it into "nevela" or "trefa". There we some rabanim who permitted it but they are minority. One of the most comprehensive source is "Edut Neemana" (hebrewbooks.org/22298). regarding the trefa see page 12 toward the end.



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