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6

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? ...


3

No, a wire would not be a good shechita knife, because when it's cutting, it goes entirely under the neck, which is a problem of חלדה, "tunneling." חלדה is one of the five main halachos of shechita. See שמלה חדשה 24:9 et seqq for more info. To borrow an illustration of חלדה from a previous answer of mine, this is not חלדה, but if the circled area goes under ...


2

An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They can also use its hide: Ye shall not eat of any thing that dieth of itself; thou mayest give it unto the stranger that is within thy gates, that he may eat it; or thou mayest sell it unto a foreigner; for thou art ...


2

Drisa is the problem that comes to mind. A sharp object that cuts by slicing when moved across the animals neck is allowed. Drisa is cutting through pressure applied in a downward force. Using a cheese cutter or the like would render the animal a niveila. Unfit to eat and Tamei.


1

While the talmudic passage quoted above is certainly relevant in this case, I don't think that it is necessary to even resort to such a source in this case. According to it's own interpretive methodology, the question was flawed from the beginning. The question was why the pasuq in Shemoth 21:28 needed to state "wa-lo ye'okhel eth besaro - and its meat ...



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