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Rabbi Moshe Isserlis writes (YD 275:6) about various scribal traditions including large/small letters that אם שינה לא פסל - if [the scribe] deviated, he did not invalidate [the scroll]. Obviously if they can be fixed, one should do so to conform with the tradition.


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To answer your question: It's been said in the name of Reb Chaim Kanievsky that one should not hide one's Peyot behind one's ears, but he never says to cut them. There are plenty well respected Rabbis who hide their Peyot behind their ears, and others who have trimmed Peyot . Just to put this in context, let's go back to basics - using classic sources. ...


4

Olas Yitzchak 292 says it is known from the times of the Rambam even though the Rambam did not hold it was necessary. He brings in the name of the Sefer Shaar HaMitzvos - Rabbi Chaim Vital - Parshas Kedoshim in the name of the Arizal. Ben Ish Chai in his Sefer Ben Ish Chayil says that when Mordechai was Muchtar Binimuso it means long Paiyos.


3

DoubleAA is correct that a Torah that is missing scribal traditions is still valid. However, if another Torah is available, the Torah inconsistent with tradition should not be used. (see Shevet HaLevi 4, Yoreh Deah 141) In addition, if the Torah was from a tradition that normally conforms with the small and large letters and, nevertheless, is consistently ...


3

Per Rabbi Shraga Simmons at About.com: Question: Why do male Chasidic Jews have the long side curls in their hair? Answer: The Torah says, "You shall not round off the peyos of your head" (Leviticus 19:27). The word peyos refers to sideburns -- i.e. the hair in front of the ears that extends to underneath the cheekbone which is level with the ...


3

See Rabbi Neustadt’s book which quotes the Mishnah Berurah 27: 15 to say that long hair is not a natural outgrowth of the body and therefore constitutes a chatzitzah between the head and the head-tefila. There are however lenient opinions. There is a long article by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz - this is his conclusion: While one who grows long hair cannot be ...


2

When I was learning in Israel, someone posted an article written by R' Aharon Lichtenstein about having long hair. If I recall correctly, there were 3 issues he raised and evaluated: 1) Interruption for tefillin: There is a dispute between the Machatzis Hashekel and the Pri Megadim as to whether hair is an interruption on the spot it is grown, or ...


2

Rabbi Natan Slifkin has an extensive presentation of all the different sides of the kezayis discussion here. He brings many opinions that actually do hold that the correct size of the kezayis is the actual size of an olive: R. Chaim of Volozhin (1749-1821) is widely revered as the father of the yeshivah world. Less known and certainly less popular in ...


2

If one eats enough bread to be satisfied, the chiyuv of ברכת המזון ("the beracha acharona for bread") is d'oraysa. According to many opinions, this is not the case for other berachos. Some may dispute this for "ברכה אחת מעין שלוש" ("al hamichya"), but anyways eating that much mezonos (if its פת הבא בכיסנין ) will normally require a full ברכת המזון . The ...


2

The table on page 86 (page 22 in the PDF) of Sheldon Epstein, Bernard Dickman, and Yonah Wilamowsky's paper "Parsha Management — Doubling, Halving, Accuracy"[1] is of the parashiyos and their lengths. According to the data in that table, we have: Counting each parasha separately, the deciles are 176 (100%), 148 (90%), 134 (80%), ...


1

Tiny spots, or even larger ones, on the batim do not invalidate the tefillin. (MB 32:184 However, white spots on the straps, especially on the first loop which fastens the bayit to your arm do and must be fixed. These are very common and most people don't notice them right away. (Mishna Berurah 33:3:19)


1

I had that question for a Sofer once. The psak was that if the dot is less than a millimeter "or so" in isolation, then it is fine. In this specific case he looked at the Tefillin to determine, but that was the principle he was stating. It may be mehudar in terms of making it look nice for the Mitzvah to make it completely black even if the dot itself is of ...


1

I'm not sure about Rav Ben-Tzion Abba Shaul (I'd be very interested in hearing if anyone knows), but Rav Menashe Klein (Mishneh Halachos 7:121) quotes from R. Chaim Zvi Manheimer that people who grow their payos long and hide them behind their ears do look as if they're embarassed that they're performing a mitzvah, and that's a problem. Personally, I would ...



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