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13

http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/weekly_torah.php?id=680 If one cannot partake in the siyum in person, some permit him to listen to the siyum via telephone. This should only be relied upon in extraordinary situations. (Horav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach zt"l quoted in Yoma Tova L'rabanan page 70 footnote 16, see Modanei Shlomo (Moadim) page)


10

Not all the "Bar Papa"s mentioned in the list are the sons of the Rav Papa from the Bavli. The Sefer HaEshkol, written by Rav Avraham Av Beit Din (father-in-law of the Raavad) brings a statement of Rav Hai Gaon (and a proof) that the ten Bar Papas are not all sons of the Rav Papa the student of Rava: HaEshkol Hilchot Sefer Torah 14. They did not all live ...


7

Choosing a quick and easy mesechta of mishnayos is a highly subjective activity. The first consideration, obviously, is length. However, there are plenty of relatively short mesechtos, so this is not a major problem. The biggest issue, especially for someone with a limited background, is to avoid having too many new concepts at once, especially big ...


6

I'm not a Rav so please confirm the following with your local orthodox rabbi. The following is from Kof-K. Horav Chaim Pinchus Sheinberg Shlita is of the opinion that a person who went through the mesechta with an English translation may make a siyum. However, the person who is using the English has to be actually working on understanding the Gemorah and ...


6

One explanation (from Artscroll Hadran) Rav Pappa was a very wealthy man who would make great celebrations each time he finished a Mesechta, and invited his 10 sons as well as many others. He therefore brought glory to Torah, which was "reflected in the scholarly attainments of his sons." So we honor Rav Pappa and his family by mentioning them at every ...


6

Rav Moshe writes in his Igros Moshe OH 1:157 that if someone did learn and feels accomplished then that calls for celebration but he also mentions that it took some time and it seems from the tshuva that the mikra was completed and the Rishonim were used for iyun. see inside for mekoros. Rav Eliyashiv is quoted in the Sefer Va'yishma Moshe and held to be ...


6

Philosophically, the siyyum is a way to celebrate your accomplishment with your community. Especially since the siyyum requires (1) a minyan, so you can say the kaddish derabbanan, and (2) a celebratory meal, it's a way of sharing your personal study accomplishment. The hadran is one's declaration of intent to return to this subject matter again someday. ...


5

In the Artscroll Iyov - from Rabbi Shimon Schwab Zatzal it mentions that there is there is no need for a Hadran on Torah Sh'Biksav. The whole intention of saying Hadran is to highlight the perpetual need for Chazorah of the Torah Sh'Baal Peh, which was not intended to be written, it was supposed to be memorized.


5

Perhaps the practice parallels the practice in some communities of reading the beginning of Bereishit just after finishing the Torah on Simchat Torah. The Tur wites about this (OC 669): ורגילין להתחיל מיד בראשית כדי שלא יהא פתחון פה לשטן לקטרג לומר כבר סיימו אותה ואינם רוצים לקרותה עוד And we are accustomed to start immediately [reading the portion of] ...


5

Tamid is, except for the very end, a story of how things used to be in the bes hamikdash. You can practically just read through it without commentary (though having a floor plan of the second bes hamikdash — usually published as an appendix to nearby maseches Midos — handy will help a good deal).


5

I heard from Rabbi Strasser from Boro Park that it isn't necessary to actually hear the siyum. The person who did the siyum celebrates by throwing a party and invites people to join him. All those that partake in the party are exempt from fasting. In fact, some people mistakenly believe that hearing the siyum is all that's required, and subsequently go home ...


4

I personally made a siyum on Shas right after mincha, and R' Herschel Schachter paskened that we shouldn't say tachanun during mincha.


4

Rav Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer OC 4:13) discusses this topic and concludes in favor of not saying tachanun at a siyum in order to emphasize the aspect of happiness when learning Torah and thereby reward those who do learn Torah / entice others to learn Torah too.


4

In a comment on the question, b a suggested: Avos (more mishnayos but no universal concepts needed to memorize) Its mishnayos are mostly moral lessons. They are deep, but can be read and understood superficially with some benefit.


4

Here is a video of Rabbi Reisman's text that he said when he made a Siyum on Sefer Yirmyahu. Do you say Hadran Alach Nevi'im? Hadran Alach Sifrei Nevi'im? I remember him saying it but it is not in the video. Do you mention all the sons of Rav Pappa? At the end there is usually a phrase that says BeZchut Kol HaTannaim HaKetuvim Bo. How is this ...


4

In my experience. . . Generally, yes, and many knowledgeable people I've met who have a lot of siyumim under their belts don't seem to mind that much about it (which I have always found surprising). Usually not. Indeed things relating to anniversaries generally ignore the time of day and rather calculate the reocurrence of the original date's day as their ...


4

The Rama writes meat and wine by a seudas mitzvah davka and the food can only be eaten in the room of the siyum(Mishna Brurah 551:75).It seems that meat and wine are the only exception and it only applies during the seudah,not the rest of the day. It should be noted that planning a siyum to davka come out during the nine days is not so pashut,even though ...


4

These questions are dealt with here: The Shulchan Aruch (OC 551:9) writes that one mustn’t eat meat or drink wine during the nine days. The Rema (OC 551:10) adds that if one has a seudas mitzva during this time then one may partake of wine and meat as such celebrations are incomplete without them. This includes Shabbos meals, a bris seuda, a pidyon ...


3

This webpage has a good list of the sources for making a siyum, starting with Abaya in the Gemara (Shabbos 118b): Abaye said: If I saw a scholar who completed a tractate, then I would make a holiday for the Rabbis. This document from the Kof-K website (I'm pretty sure it's one of the earlier editions of Halachically Speaking), breaks down the why, when ...


3

The main obligation is to give charity (and thereby "redeem the fast"). The siyum itself is really just extra, and in fact, as noted in the answers above, the siyum doesn't really "work" since most people do not actually join in a celebratory meal afterward. So the minimal requirement is charity. This was explained by one of the poskei hador in the US, R. ...


3

This doesn't answer the questions you posted, like "what purpose does the siyum have in Jewish life", but I'll address your first point, whether "structuring my learning to pursue finishing enough to make a siyum" "is a noble goal". Yes, it is. I speak from experience (and relate advice I've heard, too) in saying that having a goal like that in mind will ...


3

In this lecture, the speaker quotes R' Moshe Feinstein that anything that you do that you feel proud of accomplishing — even someone who learned one daf of gemara, if it was hard for him — you can make a siyum on it.


3

I recently heard that Rabbi Elyashiv Zatzal always made a Siyum on Erev Pesach. Once a fellow asked him that he was not a Bechor as his mother had prior miscarriages so why does he make a Siyum every year. He said he knows he is not a Bechor he does it since the Rav is supposed to make a Siyum. It is quite likely that often a Bechor makes the Siyum since he ...


3

Expanding upon my answer from here: I once wanted to learn a Masechta for the purpose of making a Siyum, and I learned it on mp3 and made a Siyum with the approval of a prominent Rav. The primary objective, I believe, is to learn to the best of your ability. If you cannot understand a single word and you refuse to use "tricks" to make it easier to ...


3

At several siyums for my Daf Yomi group, I heard Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer tell a story involving Rav Moshe Feinstein, which he used to address the subject question. Rabbi Anemer related that one of the Rav's students came from a non-yeshivish background. One day his father asked him to explain to him what it was they were learning in yeshiva. So, the son ...


3

In an Orthodox setting, the woman will not likely be asked to lead the Siyum (although...) or say the Kaddish, but just scrolling through some of the past Siyumim posted here, you can see a number of women who signed up to learn.


3

While, as Seth J answered, there's likely nothing wrong with it, anyone signing up to study toward a communal siyum in someone's memory should bear in mind that doing so is partially for the deceased's relatives' peace of mind and comfort. If the relatives are of the sort that would be disturbed by a woman's contributing toward the siyum, it might be better ...


3

The ספר האשכול in Hilchos Sefer Torah 14 brings down the Hadran Alach, Yehi Ratzon, and sons of Rav Pappa parts. I think that is the earliest source, and he does not have the Haarev, Modim, or second Yehi Ratzon.



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