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11

There are places that count women to make the minyan; that's a different issue. Aaron's notion of "minyan kavua" sounds familiar; Rabbi Y. H. Henkin has an essay on the topic, if I recall: http://www.amazon.com/Responsa-Contemporary-Jewish-Womens-Issues/dp/0881257826/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1260672749&sr=8-3 UPDATED: Hat tip to R' Yahu ...


11

My understanding has been that a Mechitza is only required for a minyan Kavuah (a minyan that meets regularly at established times and place) While we continue to separate at private irregular minyam from custom and perhaps Tzniut, I don't think the lack of separation would prohibit participating in the Tefillah. In my personal opinion (and you should ask ...


8

Although this is indeed the custom in many communities [some Chassidic communities circle the house seven times], there is no written source for it. Some explain that it is meant to escort the soul of the deceased to its proper place (Nitei Gavriel 136:16). Others maintain that the purpose of this custom is to demonstrate that the mourner is now permitted ...


7

From an article on aish.com by Rabbi Yisrael Rutman: ...a person who has lost a loved one often feels that he has been abandoned by God; that there is no God where he is. We say to the mourner, therefore, that HaMakom should comfort him: We pray that he be blessed by a renewed awareness of God's presence, even in the grief-stricken place in which he now ...


6

My understanding is that 30 days was considered a rule of thumb for whether we call this a healthy baby that could have lived, but then died; vs. a sign that this pregnancy was never truly viable. Traditionally (for instance Chochmas Adam 161:6), the understanding was that an "eight-month-gestation" baby was born with severe defects and thus never got ...


5

If two family members die on the same day, only one shiva is observed. If a family member dies during shiva, shiva for the second relative begins concurrently with the first. There is no need to sit shiva twice consecutively. For example, a person is observing the second day of shiva and hears that another relative has died (and was buried), he observes ...


5

I suspect another influence on this is that according to Midrash, in Temple times, mourners would enter the Temple and be told: השוכן בבית הזה ינחמך May the One whose Presence is felt here grant you consolation If so it would make a lot of sense that in post-Temple times, the greeting became: May the One beyond space grant you consolation.


5

This answer is a community wiki, which means that it is easier for people to edit and that its initial author gets no reputation credit for upvotes to it. Please edit what's here and contribute more. They will need: A designated coordinator of the shiva. This may be a family member, close friend, volunteer, rabbi, etc. Low chairs, for mourners. Regular ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 393:1) that someone who is sitting Shiv'ah (who is generally not allowed to leave his house even for mitzva purposes) is allowed to attend the burial of someone else (even unrelated) in the community from the third day of Shiv'ah and onward, and if the deceased doesn't have enough people to act as pallbearers and gravediggers ...


3

http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=22460&pgnum=279 HaRav Tzvi Pesach Frank Zatzal says that you may say Chaim Aruchim to the mourners and it is not considered like a greeting.


2

The loss is felt as a void in one's life - an empty space . Only G-D who is called HAMAKOM in that HE IS THE SPACE OF THE WORLD BUT THE WORLD IS NOT HIS SPACE. This means the existence is within G-D so G-D is the space. Since nothing in the world can make up for the void except for G-D who is and fills all space we express the wish that G-D will fill that ...


2

There's a Rabbi Sobolofsky mp3 that says it's superstitious; there is one Talmudic quote where one sage says to another "what, you want to eat the food of mourners?". But that's not the law. He did mention the concern that sadly, as shiva houses are open to many people and the hosts have their minds elsewhere, it's not unheard of for valuables to disappear. ...


2

Eating food at the Shivah House (not with the aveilim) is not a problem. It is brought down not to take food from a shivah house. (I need to re-find the source)


2

Yehoshua 6:26 - Yehoshua curses that whoever rebuilds Jericho should bury all his children - from the oldest when he starts to the youngest when he completes it. ארור האיש אשר יבנה את העיר את יריחו. בבכורו ייסדנה ובצעירו יציב דלתיה In Melachim 1 16:34 Chial Bais Ha'Aili rebuilds Yesricho and gets punished as per Yehoshuas curse. Metzudas David Melachim 1 ...


1

Because the parent is not Jewish, there is no chiyuv (requirement) for you to sit shiva for them. That being said, there is a kibud av v'em (honor for father and mother) issue which must be contemplated when dealing with sitting shiva for a non-Jewish parent. Basically, there is a concern that the person would not be showing proper respect to his deceased ...


1

If you will permit me to draw on my own practice and experience. I try to avoid this but on those occasions where it was unpreventable, I said kaddish quietly along with the mourners. As against that, when my mother-in-law passed away, I, and another brother-in-law were in the 12 months for parents and the three of us (2 brothers-in-law and I) stood up ...


1

It is brought down not to eat together with the aveilim.



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