Hot answers tagged

10

Mishna Berura 660:1:3 says that when the Sefer Torah is on the Bimah those on the Mizrach (eastern wall) turn around to face the Torah their right side is now facing Tzafon (north) therfore they start in that direction.


3

from Halachipedia: Tosfot (Beitzah 30a s.v. Tenan) writes that the gezerah of Chazal only applied then when they were experts in fixing musical instruments but it wouldn’t apply to us since we’re not experts in that area. The Bet Yosef 339:3 writes that the implication of all the poskim who simply copy the prohibition of the Mishna is that ...


3

Yalqut Yosef states (in Se'if 5) that Simhhat Torah was not part of the Rabbinic decree (of not clapping/dancing) to safeguard against fixing tools. He states that, out of honor for the Torah, HaZa"L did not include Simhhat Torah celebrations in the decree.


2

One answer is that it is juxtaposed with the giving of the Torah - but the giving of the second Tablets on Yom Kippur, not the first tablets on Shavuos. This is explained at length in several places in Chabad Chassidus. One of them is here. The Meshech Chochma says that on Shmini Atzers Zos HaBracha was read anyway. The Talmud which describes reading Zos ...


2

See p. 180 in this book. Hakafot on SImchat Torah was a relatively late addition done in the 16th century. One of the reasons mentioned in the source is that it is actually a supplication and extension of the prayer for rain. That is why we say Ana Hashem Hoshi'ah Na. Reason #2 on that page notes that the Hakafot use one of the last phrases in Halel. I am ...


2

Strictly speaking the Torah should be read only in the daytime. But since the scrolls have already been removed from the Ark for the processions, some argue that there ought to be a reading so that the Torahs have not been taken out in vain. The Rema says in his glosses to the Shulchan Aruch, “Each place follows its own custom”. Where the reading does ...


1

Everything done in a Beit Kenesset is modeled on the procedures as they were done in the Temple, "HaMikdash", in Jerusalem. That is why a synagogue is known as "Mikdash Me'at", a small Temple. In the Temple, when the first Kohen would enter in the morning to unlock the doors, they would turn to the right and proceed to go counter-clockwise around to unlock ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible