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Mishna Berura 660:1:3 says that when the Sefer Torah is on the Bimah those on the Mizrach (eastern wall) turn around to face the Torah their right side is now facing Tzafon (north) therfore they start in that direction.


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R. Nachum Rabinovitch (Siach Nachum, no. 40) addresses this question. Assuming that the congregation and the rabbi do not object, he says there is no halakhic problem with this, as long as the sefer Torah is treated with the respect due to it (from both men and women). However, it is also forbidden to cause machloket, such that if this will do so it would be ...


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from Halachipedia: Tosfot (Beitzah 30a s.v. Tenan) writes that the gezerah of Chazal only applied then when they were experts in fixing musical instruments but it wouldn’t apply to us since we’re not experts in that area. The Bet Yosef 339:3 writes that the implication of all the poskim who simply copy the prohibition of the Mishna is that ...


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Yalqut Yosef states (in Se'if 5) that Simhhat Torah was not part of the Rabbinic decree (of not clapping/dancing) to safeguard against fixing tools. He states that, out of honor for the Torah, HaZa"L did not include Simhhat Torah celebrations in the decree.


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1. whether, after the nighttime hakafos and before the reading of the Torah, the congregation says "B'rich shmeh"; The לוח דבר בעתו on page 242 (תשע"א) says: Yes. 2. Same question for daytime; The לוח דבר בעתו says: Yes. 3. whether, after the nighttime hakafos and before the reading of the Torah, the leader/congregation says "Sh'ma", "Echad Elokenu", ...


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Strictly speaking the Torah should be read only in the daytime. But since the scrolls have already been removed from the Ark for the processions, some argue that there ought to be a reading so that the Torahs have not been taken out in vain. The Rema says in his glosses to the Shulchan Aruch, “Each place follows its own custom”. Where the reading does take ...


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Everything done in a Beit Kenesset is modeled on the procedures as they were done in the Temple, "HaMikdash", in Jerusalem. That is why a synagogue is known as "Mikdash Me'at", a small Temple. In the Temple, when the first Kohen would enter in the morning to unlock the doors, they would turn to the right and proceed to go counter-clockwise around to unlock ...



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