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My local orthodox rabbi told us that on Simchas Torah, Korach jumps and yells "Moshe emes v'Toraso emes" in admission that he was wrong to rebel against Moshe Rabbeinu. In celebration of Korach's defeat, our rabbi jumps during the dancing in imitation of Korach on the words "Moshe emes v'Toraso emes". My conjecture is that throwing children is a natural ...


5

The Baal HaTanya writes in his siddur: מנהג ותיקין הוא לעשות יום שמיני עצרת גם כן כמו בשמחת תורה It is a custom of the ancients(?) to do on Shmini Atzeres like on Simchas on Torah ... And then going on to describe Hakafos. Rabbi Nachum Greenwald notes that the language seems to paraphrase the Mishnas Chassidim, but the Mishnas Chassidim is ...


5

This song was on Pirchei volume 2 - Aleicha Hashem is the tape title. Here is a link where you can request to hear the song. This tape was produced by Rabbi Eli Teitelbaum Zatzal in 5731/1971. The choir director was Eli Lipsker. The soloist on the song was Yechiel Moskovitz. There is no mention of the composer of the songs, and per my e-mail communication ...


4

As indicated by msh210, it is a common custom on Simchas Torah to turn the Sefer Torah outwards when doing Hagbah after reading V'zos habrachah. Some Ashkenazim do it both by night and by day, some only in the morning, and some not at all.1 As for the reasons:2 Pirkei Avos 5:26: "Turn the Torah over and over for everything is in it." A symbol of turning ...


4

Your question is addressed by the Remo in סימן תרסט - סדר יום שמחת תורה, though he doesn't explain the rationale behind it. וְנָהֲגוּ עוֹד לְהַרְבּוֹת הַקְּרוּאִים לַסֵּפֶר תּוֹרָה, וְקוֹרִים פָּרָשָׁה אַחַת הַרְבֵּה פְּעָמִים וְאֵין אִסּוּר בַּדָּבָר (מִנְהָגִים וריב''ש סִימָן פ''ד). ‏ "The custom is to call up lots of people to the Torah [on ...


1

Shaare Efrayim 8:60 and many other works cite the custom to call an esteemed person for this aliya. Perhaps "rabi" is used in the formula because it's typically a rabbi (as indeed it is in my own experience).


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Nitai Gavriel (Hilchos Chag HaSukkos 98:10) brings this custom as existing in several communities. This was permitted because the joy in celebrating the completion of the Torah. The Nitai Gavriel himself says that this should only be done in those communities where this is the established custom. Otherwise, one should be more strict, and if they need to do ...



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