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7

My favorite commentator when it comes to understanding the differences of meanings between words (that may seem like synonyms) is the Malbim. He has some wonderful and minute distinctions between such pairs, and he holds to them throughout his commentary on the Tanach. These small differences can open a wide world of new understandings. Luckily, he does ...


3

(No sources; this is my own thinking.) We learn that we must take positive action to affirm our relationship with God and k'lal Yisrael. Yisraelites who merited being spared from this affliction were nonetheless affected if they did not take action. We learn that we sometimes must take public action to affirm our status as Yisraelim. The blood was placed ...


3

Opinion that Moshe and Aron had separate staffs. The Abarbenel Parshas B'shalch 17:1 writes that Moshe Rabbeinu was buried with his staff . This was done because Moshe was the greatest Navi and HaShem didn't want anyone else using this powerful tool. Text: אברבנאל שמות פרק יז ומפני שהיה המטה כלי האלהי יתברך לפעול הנפלאות נמסר לאדון הנביאים ואף יהושע ...


1

Far from a complete answer but perhaps "heavy" is not the best translation contextually of כבד which suggests instead more Pharaoh's incredible hubris (כבוד). That root seems to only appear in the initial stages of the confrontations, when direct divine intervention was not yet as necessary in order to incite his arrogant stubbornness.


1

A possible way to understand the different usage is to look to the Targum Onkelos. In the examples you cite, Shemot 14:17 and Shemot 14:25: וַאֲנִ֗י הִנְנִ֤י מְחַזֵּק֙ אֶת־לֵ֣ב מִצְרַ֔יִם וְיָבֹ֖אוּ אַחֲרֵיהֶ֑ם וְאִכָּבְדָ֤ה בְּפַרְעֹה֙ וּבְכָל־חֵיל֔וֹ בְּרִכְבּ֖וֹ וּבְפָרָשָֽׁיו׃ וַיָּ֗סַר אֵ֚ת אֹפַ֣ן מַרְכְּבֹתָ֔יו וַֽיְנַהֲגֵ֖הוּ בִּכְבֵדֻ֑ת ...


1

What can we learn from the Jews being commanded to put blood on the doorposts of their homes in Egypt? There is life in the blood. Leviticus 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul. This blood allowed ...


1

It probably comes from the Aramaic root מפק or נפק which means to take out, so it means the same thing as Exodus.


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Ibn Ezra on the Pasuk writes: וימת מלך מצרים. עתה יוכל משה לשוב אל מצרים. וישראל עשו תשובה. כי יחזקאל הזכיר שהיו ישראל עובדים גלולי מצרים. על כן ענם השם ותחת אשר לא עבדוהו עבדו אכזרים And the king of Egypt died- Now Moshe could return to Egypt. And Israel had done repentance. For Yechezkel mentioned* that Bnai Yisrael were worshipers of the egyptian ...



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