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7

According to the simple meaning of the verses, there must have been at least three: the one whom Yosef served as vizier, the one who started the oppression ("a new king arose," Ex. 1:8) and who died (ibid. 2:23), and the one whom Moshe confronted. However, we find opinions in the Gemara and Midrash (cited in Rashi to both of these verses) that take these ...


5

The book of Exodus ends with "as God's presence was with them, for all their travels." The Ramban explains that they didn't achieve full redemption from Egypt until that point. Now they had a post-Egyptian purpose and identity.


5

The Netziv in his introduction to Sh'mos says that the ultimate purpose is NOT the redemption from Egypt, but the building of the mishkan and subsequent dwelling of the Shekhina. Remember, the exodus itself happens relatively soon in the sefer, while matan torah and the mishkan take up a much larger portion.


5

Ramban, in his commentary to this verse, says that it's the same rock mentioned earlier (Ex. 17:6): ...הִנְנִי עֹמֵד לְפָנֶיךָ שָּׁם עַל הַצּוּר בְּחֹרֵב Behold, I will be standing before you there on the rock at Chorev... He doesn't explain further. But perhaps we can say that in that case there seems to be a clear reason for the definite ...


4

The number of people in a generation is (N/2) * x where N is the number of people in the previous generation and x is the number of children each couple has. If N_0 = 70 and x = 6, after 10 generations, there would be over 4 million children. And that's assuming everyone in all previous generations had died.


4

I think it seems clear from the narrative (8:4–9) (but I have no further source) that his prayer for the plague to cease was for it to cease from the Egyptians, and was pursuant to Pharaoh's request. As to why he cried out (rather than merely praying): Ibn Ezra explains (if I understand him correctly) that he really wanted the frogs gone, lest he be shamed ...


3

I heard a shi'ur that cited the Pa'ne'ach Raza giving three answers to this question: He actually wanted people to see him there because they would see him acting toward the river in a degrading way and treat him rather than it as a deity. Par'o enacted a law that no person should go outside before a defined hour in order to conceal his morning activities. ...


3

According to the midrash to which you allude (Sh'mos Raba 9:8), Par'o was intentionally hiding from people in order to lead them to the false conclusion that he was a deity. If so, I would assume he looked around to make sure there was nobody there before proceeding. He was looking for them but they were not looking for him. Moshe, on the other hand, had the ...


3

If you're assuming no astrology, magic, or other forms of mysticism, then one should look at political / sociological reasonings, with a historical context. Pharoah is known to relieve his advisors, if and when he believes they are of no use to him (often "relieving" them of their heads - see e.g. the story of Yosef...) Naturally, his advisors are ...


2

Assuming the “astrologers” had no real power of prediction, we must understand what their plan was. What cause the astrologers to make up such a declaration? Perhaps there are two possible explanations to the astrologers plan. One approach is to suggest that the astrologers were working together with Pharaoh to come up with a plan to undermine Bnei Yisroel. ...


2

Exodus 1:13 uses a word sharing the ayin-vet-yod (e-v-d) root "So the Egyptians enslaved the children of Israel with back breaking labor." The phrase "back breaking labor" seems to point not to a simple worker or servant and the details in verse 14 flesh out that enslavement. Chapter 2 verse 27 shows that the "work" (from the same root) was oppressive (as ...


2

To first clarify, even though lying is usually frowned upon, I'm pretty sure that, at least ethically speaking, there's no reason to frown upon lying to Pharaoh in this situation if it was necessary to save the Jews. The question being dealt with here is why was this deception necessary - couldn't God have saved them without the lie? Thanks to this shiur, ...


1

They were wandering for 40 years on purpose.


1

Was Moshe decieving Pharoh, or was the original “Exodus” from Egypt meant to be temporary? Exodus 3:18 And they shall hearken to thy voice: and thou shalt come, thou and the elders of Israel, unto the king of Egypt, and ye shall say unto him, The LORD G-d of the Hebrews hath met with us: and now let us go, we beseech thee, three days' journey into ...


1

There are a number of answers ranging from strengthening Pharaoh so that he could withstand the plagues, to the difference in language showing that Pharaoh hardened his own heart at first and G0d only did that later after Pharaoh had reached the level of requiring punishment, ... Check out Hardened Hearts: Some Explanations to see some of them ...


1

Hashem wanted it to be obvious that the plagues were intentional and not just a natural occurrence, thus Moshe and Aharon using a physical staff, while not necessary for the miracle, showed the Egyptians who was responsible.


1

Check out http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/tohen.asp?id=676 חלק א . By the way - read the rest of the book too. It is amazing.


1

In the Guide of the Perplexed, the Rambam says: The phrase" stood upon it" indicates the permanence and constancy of God, and does not imply the idea of physical position. This is also the sense of the phrase" Thou shalt stand upon the rock" (Exod. xxxiii. 21).



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