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8

The Netziv in his introduction to Sh'mos says that the ultimate purpose is NOT the redemption from Egypt, but the building of the mishkan and subsequent dwelling of the Shekhina. Remember, the exodus itself happens relatively soon in the sefer, while matan torah and the mishkan take up a much larger portion.


7

The number of people in a generation is (N/2) * x where N is the number of people in the previous generation and x is the number of children each couple has. If N_0 = 70 and x = 6, after 10 generations, there would be over 4 million children. And that's assuming everyone in all previous generations had died.


7

According to the simple meaning of the verses, there must have been at least three: the one whom Yosef served as vizier, the one who started the oppression ("a new king arose," Ex. 1:8) and who died (ibid. 2:23), and the one whom Moshe confronted. However, we find opinions in the Gemara and Midrash (cited in Rashi to both of these verses) that take these ...


7

My favorite commentator when it comes to understanding the differences of meanings between words (that may seem like synonyms) is the Malbim. He has some wonderful and minute distinctions between such pairs, and he holds to them throughout his commentary on the Tanach. These small differences can open a wide world of new understandings. Luckily, he does ...


7

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? ...


6

To first clarify, even though lying is usually frowned upon, I'm pretty sure that, at least ethically speaking, there's no reason to frown upon lying to Pharaoh in this situation if it was necessary to save the Jews. The question being dealt with here is why was this deception necessary - couldn't God have saved them without the lie? Thanks to this shiur, ...


6

The book of Exodus ends with "as God's presence was with them, for all their travels." The Ramban explains that they didn't achieve full redemption from Egypt until that point. Now they had a post-Egyptian purpose and identity.


6

Ramban, in his commentary to this verse, says that it's the same rock mentioned earlier (Ex. 17:6): ...הִנְנִי עֹמֵד לְפָנֶיךָ שָּׁם עַל הַצּוּר בְּחֹרֵב Behold, I will be standing before you there on the rock at Chorev... He doesn't explain further. But perhaps we can say that in that case there seems to be a clear reason for the definite ...


4

I think it seems clear from the narrative (8:4–9) (but I have no further source) that his prayer for the plague to cease was for it to cease from the Egyptians, and was pursuant to Pharaoh's request. As to why he cried out (rather than merely praying): Ibn Ezra explains (if I understand him correctly) that he really wanted the frogs gone, lest he be shamed ...


4

The Ibn Ezra says he is surprised at why there is a new paragraph here. He doesn't answer his question, but he says the one who divided the sections must have had a good reason, because he is much smarter than we are.


4

I think it's a combination of Midrashim - one that says that Moshe's stick was previously Yaakov's, and the other that saying that this bolt was Yaakov's: The Yalkut Shimoni (168) writes that Moshe's stick had quite some history. It originated with Adam's banishment from Gan Eden, and was used by the Avos, etc. It was Yaakov that took it to Mitzraim, though ...


4

Side note See mishnayos Zevachim, 14:4-8, where different time periods are mentioned for when "במות" (altars outside of the Temple/Tabernacle) where permitted; you are correct in your assumption that they are currently forbidden (ibid., 8). Real answer The verse you cited in your question, according to Rashi (ibid.), refers to the Altar of the Tabernacle, ...


3

While the talmudic passage quoted above is certainly relevant in this case, I don't think that it is necessary to even resort to such a source in this case. According to it's own interpretive methodology, the question was flawed from the beginning. The question was why the pasuq in Shemoth 21:28 needed to state "wa-lo ye'okhel eth besaro - and its meat ...


3

For your first question about needing to be told that the bull cannot be eaten, see this answer. Your other question is asks why we care about ownership; we care because there are uses for the carcass besides food. An animal that you can't eat, but are allowed to benefit from, can be sold to non-Jews. Non-Jews have no prohibition against eating it. They ...


3

Opinion that Moshe and Aron had separate staffs. The Abarbenel Parshas B'shalch 17:1 writes that Moshe Rabbeinu was buried with his staff . This was done because Moshe was the greatest Navi and HaShem didn't want anyone else using this powerful tool. Text: אברבנאל שמות פרק יז ומפני שהיה המטה כלי האלהי יתברך לפעול הנפלאות נמסר לאדון הנביאים ואף יהושע ...


3

(No sources; this is my own thinking.) We learn that we must take positive action to affirm our relationship with God and k'lal Yisrael. Yisraelites who merited being spared from this affliction were nonetheless affected if they did not take action. We learn that we sometimes must take public action to affirm our status as Yisraelim. The blood was placed ...


3

Check out http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/tohen.asp?id=676 חלק א . By the way - read the rest of the book too. It is amazing.


3

I heard a shi'ur that cited the Pa'ne'ach Raza giving three answers to this question: He actually wanted people to see him there because they would see him acting toward the river in a degrading way and treat him rather than it as a deity. Par'o enacted a law that no person should go outside before a defined hour in order to conceal his morning activities. ...


3

According to the midrash to which you allude (Sh'mos Raba 9:8), Par'o was intentionally hiding from people in order to lead them to the false conclusion that he was a deity. If so, I would assume he looked around to make sure there was nobody there before proceeding. He was looking for them but they were not looking for him. Moshe, on the other hand, had the ...


3

Assuming the “astrologers” had no real power of prediction, we must understand what their plan was. What cause the astrologers to make up such a declaration? Perhaps there are two possible explanations to the astrologers plan. One approach is to suggest that the astrologers were working together with Pharaoh to come up with a plan to undermine Bnei Yisroel. ...


3

If you're assuming no astrology, magic, or other forms of mysticism, then one should look at political / sociological reasonings, with a historical context. Pharoah is known to relieve his advisors, if and when he believes they are of no use to him (often "relieving" them of their heads - see e.g. the story of Yosef...) Naturally, his advisors are ...


2

The Kli Yakar says that it is to emphasize that the verse stands alone - it is telling us that Hashem spoke to Moshe by day, and not at night, unlike all the other prophets.


2

Exodus 1:13 uses a word sharing the ayin-vet-yod (e-v-d) root "So the Egyptians enslaved the children of Israel with back breaking labor." The phrase "back breaking labor" seems to point not to a simple worker or servant and the details in verse 14 flesh out that enslavement. Chapter 2 verse 27 shows that the "work" (from the same root) was oppressive (as ...


1

What can we learn from the Jews being commanded to put blood on the doorposts of their homes in Egypt? There is life in the blood. Leviticus 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul. This blood allowed ...


1

It probably comes from the Aramaic root מפק or נפק which means to take out, so it means the same thing as Exodus.


1

Ibn Ezra on the Pasuk writes: וימת מלך מצרים. עתה יוכל משה לשוב אל מצרים. וישראל עשו תשובה. כי יחזקאל הזכיר שהיו ישראל עובדים גלולי מצרים. על כן ענם השם ותחת אשר לא עבדוהו עבדו אכזרים And the king of Egypt died- Now Moshe could return to Egypt. And Israel had done repentance. For Yechezkel mentioned* that Bnai Yisrael were worshipers of the egyptian ...


1

They were wandering for 40 years on purpose.


1

Was Moshe decieving Pharoh, or was the original “Exodus” from Egypt meant to be temporary? Exodus 3:18 And they shall hearken to thy voice: and thou shalt come, thou and the elders of Israel, unto the king of Egypt, and ye shall say unto him, The LORD G-d of the Hebrews hath met with us: and now let us go, we beseech thee, three days' journey into ...


1

There are a number of answers ranging from strengthening Pharaoh so that he could withstand the plagues, to the difference in language showing that Pharaoh hardened his own heart at first and G0d only did that later after Pharaoh had reached the level of requiring punishment, ... Check out Hardened Hearts: Some Explanations to see some of them ...


1

Hashem wanted it to be obvious that the plagues were intentional and not just a natural occurrence, thus Moshe and Aharon using a physical staff, while not necessary for the miracle, showed the Egyptians who was responsible.



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