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19

http://www.ou.org/torah/tt/5766/miketz66/specialfeatures.htm Rambam (Sh'vuos 12:9) rules that one who uses Hashem's Name in a meaningless oath or a an unwarranted blessing violates the Torah prohibition to use His Name in vain. One who utters His Name without a purpose transgresses the lower level, Torah commandment to fear His Name (ibid.:11).In ...


13

Two possibilities I can think of: The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and ...


12

י and ה by themselves do form a Divine name, used in several places in the Bible (e.g., Ex. 17:16). All of the laws about not erasing a name of G-d apply to it as well (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 276:10). As for י and ו, we do find those used as a representation of G-d's name in personal names like יוחנן (Yochanan/Johanan, "G-d is kind") and יוכבד ...


11

In order to answer your question we need to define the scope of the prohibition on erasing G-d's name. It's based on Deuteronomy 12:3-4 וְאִבַּדְתֶּם אֶת־שְׁמָ֔ם, "and you shall destroy [the idols'] names", 'לֹֽא־תַעֲשוּן כֵּ֔ן לַה, "you shall not do the same to G-d". The extent of the prohibition is discussed in commentators to Shulchan Aruch and Tur 276:9, ...


11

When I was at KBY, I asked the campus Posek this question, and he said that it's OK, because the bentcher is protected by at least two layers of covering ("kli betoch kli"). He added that it may even be OK in a pants pocket without the wallet, since the fabric of the pocket and the fabric of the pants could constitute two layers.


11

Judaism 101 writes, Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. The ...


10

The Shach (Yoreh De'ah 179:11) ruled that "God" spelled in a foreign language does NOT have the status of a "shem" and thus may be erased, lehatkhila. For more information, you can read this article: http://www.shamash.org/lists/scj-faq/HTML/faq/11-03-01.html


10

Orach Chaim 91:3 - The Beis Yosef says that Yesh Omrim that you are not allowed to say Hashem's name with your head uncovered.


10

UPDATE: Shalom pointed to the article "Medical and Cosmetic Tattooing" by J. David Bleich (Tradition 42:4), in which a pseudo-Kabbalist directed a woman to get a tattoo containing the Divine Name. The question of removing it was brought to Sephardic Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron and printed in Or ha-Torah Shevat 5762. R. Bleich's summarizes R. ...


9

In the Torah we see the word Elokim used for both Hashem and other nations Gods (Elohim Acheirim). That proves that a word can have two meanings, and you still may use it. In addition the name Gad does not sound like God at all.


9

I recall having learned in the beginning of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch that one may not recite gods name in any language when not needed. I suppose the spelling of G-d is an extension of the same idea to writing. In general. I have a problem with this approach. It seems to me that the term "god" is no different than "Hashem". In fact spelled with a ...


9

Yalkut Yosef vol. 3 pg 548-549: הלומד בש''ס ובמדרשי חז''ל, ופוגע בפסוקים שיש בהם אזכרות שם שמים, יש לו לקראם כקריאתן בתנ''ך בהזכרת שם שמים, ואין להחמיר בזה ולכנות ולבטאת ''אלוקים'' בקו''ף ולא בה''א, או לומר ''אדושם'', או ''המוני'', שהואיל ומדינא שרי, המחמיר יוצא שכרו בהפסדו, דהוי כמכנה שם כלפי מעלה. אולם אזכרות שבמטבע ברכות המובאים בש''ס ובמדרשי חז''ל ...


9

In this week's Torah portion, both Par'oh (in Exodus 10:16) and his servants (in Exodus 10:7) use God's name explicitly. I don't think this proves it is permissible, but it does seem to imply that it's ok. Additionally, gentiles use God's name in Joshua 2:9, Joshua 9:9, Samuel I 6:8 and Samuel II 24:23 to give some examples that are Post-Sinai.


9

The ultimate source is Shabbos 10b, citing Judg. 6:24, ויקרא לו ה' שלום. For certain purposes it is indeed treated like a bona fide name of Hashem; thus, the Gemara there says (and this is cited as halachah in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 84:1)) that one may not greet another in the bathhouse with the word "Shalom," just as one may not recite blessings or ...


9

The Talmud (in Masekhet Shabbat 120b) directly discusses this issue: דתניא: הרי שהיה שם כתוב לו על בשרו - הרי זה לא ירחוץ ולא יסוך ולא יעמוד במקום הטינופת. נזדמנה לו טבילה של מצוה - כורך עליה גמי ויורד וטובל. רבי יוסי אומר: לעולם יורד וטובל כדרכו, ובלבד שלא ישפשף As it was taught in a baraita: If one had a sacred name of God written on his skin he ...


9

The sefer ביאורי אונקלוס here explains that the Targum Onkelos always translates the name Elo-him as Ado-noi so that it is clear to everyone that the posuk is talking about G-d, because the name Elo-him is also used in the Torah to mean judges. The two exceptions to this are: 1) When the posuk says ה' אלוקים - two names of Hashem together, and thus people ...


8

Sepher Shorshei HaShemot by Rabbi Moshe Zecuto is an exhaustive listing of divine names. It is an alphabetical index. Each entry lists the source of the name as well as its usage.


8

There some times where (according to kabala or something) one should have a certain vowelization of the name in mind (while still saying "Adonay" of course). You'll sometimes see the name with four tzeres or with four sh'vas or the like then. I know nothing more about this than I've just written. Otherwise, the vowelization seems to be to point to its ...


8

The 3rd commandment is not to take a pointless oath in G-d's name (e.g. swearing that a table is a table, and other pointless oaths, see ch 1) as is codified by Rambam (Hilchos Shvuos) and Sefer HaChinuch(30). By swearing pointlessly invoking the name of G-d, one trivializes G-d's significance as the singular force in the Universe. Rambam (Hilchos Berachos ...


7

In one of the Ba'al HaTurim's comments (available with English translation and commentary by Artscroll), he lists all of the names of Hashem. As Alex writes in the comment, it is in the short commentary on Numbers 11:16, in parashat Behaalotecha. It is viewable here, starting two lines from the bottom.


7

Homiletically: When you have two Yudin (or in Polish Jewish pronunciation, "Yidin" - also means "Jews") who get together on an equal level, neither of them putting themselves higher than the other, then you have Hashem's presence there. (The "Holy Jew" of Pshischa, cited in R' S.Y. Zevin's Sippurei Chassidim to Num. 14:20)


7

The rule is to always say it unless it is a hefsek. The two common cases of hefsek are: in a place that one cannot answer when a person is being yotzai with the mevarech That is why most people say it by the morning brachos... either because they've already said it, or because they want to make their own. By shemoneh esrei the idea is that people ...


7

I asked a Posek from YU and he said it shouldn't be a problem to read seforim on an E-reader. He didn't explain why, but these are two reasons that one can perhaps be meikel: Its not really a written text. Since its just particles floating in some sort of liquid, one can make an argument that it is not a real written word. Even though the text doesn't need ...


7

R. Schneur Zalman of Liadi (in Tanya, Shaar Hayichud Vehaemunah ch. 4) explains that the name Elokim "shields" the name Havayah, and makes it possible for finite and (seemingly) independent creatures to exist in the first place. Thus, Elokim represents (and is the source of) the tzimtzum, the "contraction" of Divine energy that made "room" for the various ...


7

The Mishna Berurah in siman 25 s"k 27 says that when putting on the Tefilah Shel Rosh, one should be careful that his head is covered before making the beracha. He gives the source as the Pri Megadim.


6

Two yuds is not a Name of Hashem. It is just an abbreviation or "placeholder."


6

This is a matter of the English language. I found this site which goes through some of the 'rules'. http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2004/02/04/capitalizing-god/ In essennce, a capital first letter implies a 'proper noun', it also implies a bit of 'the one and only'. Capitalizing the word 'He' means 'that "He" which we all know, the one and only.. ...


6

I have heard Rav Dovid Feinstien shlita quoted as saying (disclaimer: this wasn't heard straight from Rav Feinstein so it may be inaccurate) that photocopies can be thrown into the regular garbage as long as it is first wrapped in its own clean bag. The reason is because photocopies are not made to be permanent and are made to be used once or twice and then ...


6

Gen. 1:5 states: ויקרא א-להים לאור יום, ולחשך קרא לילה "G-d called the light 'day', and the darkness He called 'night.'" So the name of Hashem is omitted in the second half of the verse. This leads R. Elazar to comment (Bereishis Rabbah 3:6) that "G-d does not associate His name with evil, only with good."


6

People publish sidurim with Hashem's name all the time. That's what you're doing, albeit by photocopy (or laser printing) rather than by offset. So you're in the clear. (This answer doesn't, however, touch on copyright concerns.) As always, though, for practical halacha, consult your rabbi rather than relying on what you read on this site.



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