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8

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

This is a question into which I have done a little bit of research. There are two independent issues: Saying ה שפתי תפתח before the עמידה Taking three steps forward or back or both, which is an issue in itself Saying ה שפתי תפתח is attributed to R. Yohanan in Brakhot 4b והא אמר רבי יוחנן בתחלה אומר ה' שפתי תפתח ולבסוף הוא אומר יהיו לרצון אמרי פי and ...


7

There's an audio by Rabbi Uziel Milevsky z'tl (former chief rabbi of mexico) on love and marriage which answers this. basically, he points out that in the secular new year people greet each other "happy new year" in the Jewish new year, we don't say "shana semecha" (happy/joyous new year) rather we say "shana tova" (a good year). He explains there, that ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch (103:2) states: בקש לצאת ממנו רוח מלמטה ונצטער הרבה ואינו יכול להעמיד עצמו הולך אחוריו ארבע אמות ומוציא הרוח וממתין עד שיכלה הריח...וחוזר למקומו וחוזר למקום שפסק If a person has to pass gas and he is unable to hold it in, he should walk backward four amot, release the gas and wait until the smell subsides...and he should then ...


4

Here's one possible answer, from the commentary Maggid Tzedek on the siddur (link to page): כדאיתא במסכת תענית (דף כה:): שמואל הקטן גזר תעניתא וירדו להם גשמים קודם הנץ החמה. כסבורין העם לומר שבחו של צבור הוא. אמר להם: אמשול לכם משל למה הדבר דומה, לעבד שמבקש פרס מרבו, אמר להם: תנו לא ואל אשמע קולו As is related in Masekhet Ta'anit (page 25b): ...


4

A medrash Tehillim on perek 118 cites the explanation of Beruria that the verse says "yitamu chataim min ha'aretz" - not that the sinners should be destroyed, but sin should be destroyed - we do not pray for the destruction of the evildoers. The wording of this blessing echoes that sentiment - kol harisha means the evil, not the evildoers. We never pray ...


4

Gemora Avoda Zarah Daf 8a Said Rab Judah the son of Samuel b. Shilath in the name of Rab: Even though it was said that one should pray for his private needs only at ‘Who heareth prayer,’ nevertheless, if he is disposed to supplement any of the Benedictions [by personal supplications] relevant to the subject of each particular Benediction, he may ...


4

Since the first blessing of the Shemoneh Esrei relates the praises of Hashem, these three expressions עוזר ומושיע ומגן follow an ascending order of praise of the way Hashem saves us. There are several explanations what these terms mean, but I will bring just one of them from the sefer אבני אליהו as brought by the sefer רנת יצחק here to illustrate this ...


4

According to the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (21:6), you'd say it in the second prayer, not in the first. אם שכח ערבית במוצאי שבת מתפלל שחרית שתים ואומר בתפילת התשלומין אתה חוננתנו לפי שמעיקר התקנה צריך להבדיל בתפילה If one forgot to say Maariv on Motsa'ei Shabbat, he prays two Shemoneh Esreis in Shacharit and says "Atah Chonantanu" in the compensatory ...


3

The commandment of Ahavas Yisroel has its limits: Deuteronomy 13:7-12 discusses a 'enticer' who tries to lead you away from belief in Gd and Judaism. Rashi explains the many different phrases as circumventing the generally applicable altruistic mannerisms that are decreed in the Torah. The first phrase, thou shalt not consent unto him, circumvents loving a ...


3

The prayer for knowledge (atah chonen...) in the Amidah includes all kinds of knowledge. This includes the spiritual awareness that everything is for the good. See Likutei Moharan 250 (identifying da'at with the awareness that everything comes about through Divine providence). Internalizing this knowledge causes happiness and prevents depression. The ...


3

The question is based on an anachronistic assumption about the nature of heresy, specifically that heresy makes you less likely to consider curses potent and harmful. That's probably true of a cross-section of today's heretics, who tend toward atheism. And if you exclude religion, modern rationalism allows no other means by which curses could work. In ...


3

I have a book here that lists the Hebrew-calendar dates for starting "v'sen tal umatar" for the years 5750 through 5851. Counting, I see that in 26 of those 102 years (25%) Chanuka starts before that date. (And in two of the years they start the same night: 5787 and 5833.)


3

Shulchan Aruch (OC 126:3) rules that for any mistake that would require an individual to repeat Shemonei Esrieh, if the Chazzan made such a mistake in his repetition he would have to say it over again. (There are some exceptions, but they are not relevant to our question.) The Sefer Shegiyos Mi Yavin (a book dealing with the laws of mistakes that occur ...


3

This seems to parallel לא יאונה לצדיק כל און - No wrong shall be caused for the righteous, certainly according to Rashi (there on the verse and other places) that this applies to all sin, but even according to Tosfos that this only applies to food or things which are degrading for the Tzaddik, it is certainly appropriate to ask for that protection. Note in ...


3

The sefer אליהו רבה Siman 423 writes that it should be said for all the months of the leap year, but the custom is to say it only until Rosh Chodesh Nisan. The Pri Megadim explains that the Eliyahu Rabbah means that if not for our custom to stop after Adar we should really continue saying it until Tishrei. (The מהרי"ב explains that our custom of stopping ...


3

According to Balashon, the oldest usage is Mishnaic for "remission of debt" and says that according to Jastrow and Steinberg, it originates from a presumed root, "to wipe, wipe out". On the other hand, Klein states that the etymology is unknown (see above).


2

For question A, Rav Eliyashiv is quoted in sefer Vayismah Moshe pg 55 saying if you started with the tzibbur, and the guy behind also did, then you have to check to see if he finished. However, if you know that he started after you (the tzibbur), then you do not have an obligation to check to see if he finished, and you can step back.


2

Regarding part A of the question, the Kesser Rosh of R' Chaim Volozhoner in Hilchos tefillah number 33 says that it is אסור to take the three steps and there isn't an issue of יוהרא (looking haughty) in waiting. Regarding part B, the same source says that while you are waiting you should say techinos and bakashos, and learning is also allowed. I would ...


2

Assuming we are referring to the requests we've made previously, there are still ways in which a request can be granted. Indeed we do not implore God "accept our prayers", but "pity us and accept our prayers mercifully and amiably". We could at very least be asking that our requests be granted in a nice way rather than a scornful one.


2

Per Shaalos U'teshuvos Maharsham 1:1 - paragraph 3 Tosefta Menachos Perek 6 - says that Tefila and Hallel are Meakev each other, that one is not Yotzei Tefila until you say Hallel. However at the end of the paragraph he says that based on the Perisha 122 the main prohibition of interruption is only on the Shaliach Tzibur. It seems to me that based on this ...


2

The Maharal in Nesiv HaAvoda ch. 10 writes (copying bits and pieces because it is lengthy): אבל הפירוש כמו שאמרנו כי בכח הברכה הזאת הוא כל התפלה כי ברכה זאת נזכר שהוא יתברך אלהי אברהם אלהי יצחק ואלהי יעקב, והאבות הם השתלשלות העולם כי הם התחלה לעולם ובכח ההתהלה הוא הכל ובפרט ישראל אשר הם זרע האבות, ולפיכך בברכה זאת האדם קרוב אל השם יתברך ...


2

The Gemara in Megila 17b attributes it to the Anshei Keneses Hagedola, during the times of the prophets. Yoma 69b says that by adding "hagadol, hagibor vehanorah" they brought back that perception of Hashem to the world which was lost with the Churban Bais. So that would specifically place Shemona Esrei after the destruction of the first temple, at the end ...


2

Yes. See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 126:1 - "mazkirim oso" ("we remind him"). In fact, if the shatz skips over Birchas HaMalshinim, the Michaber goes as far to say "misalkin oso" ("we remove him") due to concerns of apikorsus. The Mishneh Brurah expands that concern to other brochas. Additionally, a shatz can be replaced with another shatz if he is ...


2

First of all, I would think that this would fall under the general טרחא דצבורא category - a Chazzan does not wait for people taking too long to daven or to respond amen to continue with chazzaras hashatz (O.C. 124:3 Rama), so I assume adding in a litany of cholim would also be included. That being said, the rules of adding (even in one's personal Shemoneh ...


2

The sefer שו"ת נודע ביהודה מהדורה קמא - או"ח סימן לג writes: That which the Magen Avraham writes in Siman 607 in the name of the Shelah Hakodosh to say סליחה לעונות ומחילה לפשעים is certainly a copyist error, because in the sefer שני לוחות הברית itself he writes the opposite, and it is impossible to suggest that there it is a copyist error since he ...


2

It seems that one would say the summer תן ברכה, because we have already said תפילת טל and stopped saying משיב הרוח. At least, that's what my father (a rabbi) says. In most people's versions of the ninth benediction, only a few words change in the middle depending on the season: the beginning of the benediction is constant. Not in Nusach Eidot ...


1

The Siddur אוצר התפלות quotes the commentary “Iyun Tefillo” who first quotes the reading , אַתָּה הוּא לְדוֹר וָדוֹר and then says there are those who say לְדוֹר וָדוֹר נְסַפֵּר תְּהִלָּתֶֽךָ (I have the Ashkenaz version) based on Tehillim 79 (13). From the Iyun Tefillo, both versions seem to be good. (This is similar to the question of how to read ...


1

Aruch Hashulchan 425:1 says that if even only the end of the b'racha was said as on every other week, one must repeat the amida. Mishna B'rura disagrees, but I suspect he'd agree to repeat the amida if no mention of rosh chodesh was made at all, especially because AHS's argument against MB's position is that the end of the b'racha is its main part.


1

The Sefer להגיד בבקר חסדך (Ashkenazi version אלול תשע"ב) p 77 references Rabbi Akiva Eger in O Ch 89 (1). He says the reason that we do not daven the Amidah with פרישת כפים (outstretched hands?) as we find many times in the Zohar and Pirkei de Rebbi Eliezer is because now the nations do that and it comes under the prohibition of 'לא תקים לך מצבה ...



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