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12

In Shulchan Aruch Harav siman 582 sief 3 the Baal HaTanya writes that even if you went home and said 90 times hamelech hakadosh and then were uncertain if you did it right in davening, you still have to recite over shemoneh esrei, and he explains that this is different than mashiv haruach because when you practice saying the brochoh you can't say Hashem's ...


10

Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 20:1 (yonanewman.org) When the chazan steps (back) after (completing) the quiet (individual) prayers, he should stand still for the amount of time (it takes one) to walk four cubits. He returns to his place, and says quietly ''G-d, open my lips...'' , and starts aloud ''Blessed are You...'' Everyone should be careful to be quiet now, ...


8

Rema ( OC 127:2): The Rema says that the custom is to say Sim Shalom during Shacharis and any other Tefillah that is fitting to have a Birkas Cohanim i.e. Mussaf (of Shabbos Rosh Codesh or Chag), and the Minchah of a Fast Day. Biur Halacha: a) The Minhag according to the Arizal (Chasidim) is to say Sim Shalom all the times. According to the ...


7

The Kehot Annotated Siddur says (p. 47): On days when Tachnun is said, gently strike the left side of your chest (over the heart) with a closed fist at the words חטאנו and פעשנו.


7

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


7

Berachos 10b א״ר יוסי בר׳ חנינא משום ראב״י המתפלל צריך שיכוין את רגליו שנאמר ורגליהם רגל ישרה This is brought in the Rambam Tefila 5:4 (part of תיקון הגוף for תפילה along with how to hold ones hands and where ones eyes should be, which may be understood as how to stand in front of the King) and the Smag Asei 19 (good way to remember it is that we have ...


7

Daf Al Hadaf brings this question from Kovetz Bais Hillel He brings a few answers, two of them are below. Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach answers that when Jews went to Jerusalem for Succos they were still wearing summer clothing and were unprepared for rain. However when they went for Pesach they wore winter clothing and were able to travel even in the rain. ...


6

The Kaf Hachaim siman 117 siff 3 quotes a slew of achronim (yes, Ashkenazi ones like Elya Rabba) who say not to repeat shmoneh esrei. He brings a minority opinion that one may say Shmoneh esrei again as a nidava, but he suggests against this and says to rely on the majority opinion. The seffer Shmaatsa di'Moshe in the back section called Shmuos Moshe ...


6

I witnessed the Rosh Yeshiva of Ner Israel several times pick up a sefer and learn when the Chazzan would choose a slow tune for Mimkomcha of the Shabbos Shacharis Kedusha. I don't see piyutim being any different than the sections between the primary lines of Kedusha, and certainly not any more stringent. The Rosh Yeshiva never learned or did anything ...


6

The first two are explicitly in the Talmud (Brachos 32a at the bottom), as pointed out by many commentaries on the Rambam. However, the third is often questioned, either left without a source (the Lechem Mishna) or claimed to be logical (the Maaseh Rokeah). The Or Sameach on the Rambam however finds that this is explicitly sourced in the Sifri in Zos ...


5

In Shulchan Aruch siman 123 siff 5 the Mechaber tells us the Sha'tz does not need to take 3 steps back after his repetition aloud of the Shmoneh Esrei. The Mishna Berurah 18 explains this is because he relies on the three steps he takes back after Uvah Litzion, and even though there might be Krias Hatorah and Hallel and Avinu Malkeinu, it is not a hefsek ...


5

Got this partial answer from Rabbi David Wolpe: "I have always heard that while there is no limit to personal prayers, a mi sheberach should be for four weeks unless requested longer. But I know of many that have gone longer, so there probably isn’t a prohibition." This at least answers the question about the upper bound and highlights some distinction ...


5

Even if you didn't bow on purpose, you still fulfilled your obligation (Rambam Tefillah 5:1).


5

At the end of Pathway to Prayer, R" Birnbaum has the following sources: Tanya Rabbosi, written in the 13th century, says to pray with a siddur. So does the Vilna Gaon in Even Shleyma ch. 9 note 2, and the Chofetz Chaim at the end of Shem Olam. R' Birnbaum asked R' Moshe Feinstein, and he said to daven with a siddur. Sefer HaYoshar Shaar (13th century) ...


4

It seems clear from Shulchan Aruch (119:1) that you can use any text you like. I use the form found in the ArtScroll sidurim: ‫יהי רצון… שתשלח מהרה רפואה… ל[name] בתוך שאר חולי ישראל.‬ For multiple names, I make it: ‫יהי רצון… שתשלח מהרה רפואה… ל[name] ול[name]… בתוך שאר חולי ישראל.‬ ...


4

There are two variants of this paragraph that have come down through tradition, a longer one that begins שים שלום and a shorter one that begins שלום רב. Ashkenazi tradition utilizes both by assigning one to Shaharit and the other to Minhah and Ma'ariv (or just to Ma'ariv in some Hasidic versions). (This is similar to the way that Ashkenazi tradition ...


4

A good source for how Kriat Shema developed over time is "Why We Pray What We Pray" by Rabbi Dr. Barry Freundel. I was quite surprised to learn of some of its earlier content (including the ten commandments, possibly Parshat Balak, why the section on tzitzit was added relatively late in its development). A good source for how the Shemona Esrai developed ...


4

The Rambam, Hilchos Tefillah 1:3 אם היה רגיל, מרבה בתחינה ובקשה; ואם היה ערל שפתיים, מדבר כפי יוכלו ובכל עת שירצה. וכן מניין התפילות, כל אחד ואחד כפי יכולתו--יש שמתפלל פעם אחת ביום, ויש שמתפלל פעמים הרבה. והכול היו מתפללים נוכח המקדש, בכל מקום שיהיה. וכן היה הדבר תמיד ממשה רבנו, עד עזרא. If someone was accustomed, they would increase in supplication ...


4

Chazon Ish (Dinin vehanhagos Mai'hachazon Ish 4:33) writes that he should take the steps to the side. If that is not possible, Rav Elyashiv paskens that he should start chazaras hashatz without stepping backwards.( source: Mishna Berurah (Dirshu edition) 102:Note 26 ) Aruch Hashulchan (102:13), however, writes that in a similar circumstance where the rabbi ...


4

Concerning the three steps at the end of Shmoneh Esrei, there are three opinions mentioned in the Shaarei Aharon on shulchan Aruch. 1) The Orchos Chaim (#24) says to move the right foot back first a small step. Then with the left, a large step. Afterwards, with the right a small step to make it parallel to the left. 2) The Shulchan Aruch says to start with ...


4

According to this article from the Da'at website: During the repetition of the amida, it is the Tunisian custom for the congregation to respond "livracha" (meaning "for blessing") after the words "Morid hageshem" (meaning "He brings down the rain", recited during the winter months) or "Morid hatal" (meaning "He brings down the dew", recited during the ...


4

In the Siddur Shai LaMora he explains that Bina is earned through toil (as your rav explained) and then goes on to say that in the second half we are asking that despite the fact that it requires this work and effort, we are still asking for it to be given for free (as in Rashi's explination of VesChanan). So we introduce it - you give Da'at and give us the ...


4

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 624:2) states (my translation): מי שטעה בתפלת ערבית של מוצאי יום הכפורים, ואמר המלך הקדוש או המלך המשפט, לדעת רוב האחרונים, יצא ידי חובת תפלה, והנכון שיחזור ויתפלל בתנאי של נדבה One who erred during the 'Arvit prayer of Motza'ei Yom HaKippurim, and said "HaMelekh HaQadosh" or "HaMelekh HaMishpat", ...


4

Shulchan Aruch Harav Orach Chaim 68:1 (basically paraphrasing the Ramo, with a reference to the Maharil): ומכל מקום לא יעסוק בשום דבר ואפילו בדברי תורה אסור להפסיק לעסוק כל זמן שהצבור אומרים פיוטים כ"ש לדבר שום שיחה בטילה ומכל מקום מי שלומד על ידי הרהור שרואה בספר ומהרהר אין בזה איסור כלל שהרהור אינו כדבור ואינו חשוב הפסק אלא שיש לחוש להמון עם שאל יראו ...


4

The Radvaz says (in relation to a different question) that the first silent one is the one for his personal obligation, under the principle of תדיר, and the second is to fulfill the obligation of those who couldn't daven to themselves. It doesn't seem plausible that he would say that in only the case he was dealing with (where the Shatz missed the previous ...


4

There are conflicting opinions brought in the Mishna Berurah 93 2 & 95 5. But if one needs to keep their eyes open so they can read the words there is no problem. See here a nice synopsis. http://www.torah.org/learning/tefilah/openeyes.html


4

The prayer you're referring to is called Havinenu. The Rambam in Hilchot Tefilla 2:2 states that one who is rushed, or unable to concentrate, should say Havinenu. First he says the ordinary first 3, then Havinenu instead of the middle 13, and then the last 3. He thus fulfills his obligation. In halacha #4 there, he clarifies that this does not apply during ...


4

The origin of the "condensed form" is a comment by Shmuel in Brochos 29a ושמואל אמר הביננו ה' אלהינו לדעת דרכיך ומול את לבבנו ליראתך ותסלח לנו להיות גאולים ורחקנו ממכאובינו ודשננו בנאות ארצך ונפוצותינו מארבע תקבץ והתועים על דעתך ישפטו ועל הרשעים תניף ידיך וישמחו צדיקים בבנין עירך ובתקון היכלך ובצמיחת קרן לדוד עבדך ובעריכת נר לבן ישי משיחך טרם נקרא ...


4

One may not interrupt the amida to recite kaddish if one is in the middle of the amida. Rather, one should pause and silently (and attentively) listen to the person who is reciting the kaddish and fulfill his obligation thereby (Shulchan Aruch OC 104:7). After the word yisbarach (after amein y'hei sh'meih rabba), one should continue with his amida and not ...


3

If you don't know his mother's name, you can use his father's name (Aruch Hashulchan 119:1, Orchos Rabeinu Vol 1, p 64). If you don't know his mother or father's name, you can use the surname (family name) (R' Chaim Kanievsky in Ishei Yisrael p734). If you don't know the person's proper Hebrew name, you can use an English name or a nickname that resembles ...



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