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19

Apparently, Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach says that the three steps are an integral part of Shemoneh Esrei, and should be done whenever at all possible; to the extent that one should move his wheelchair the space of three steps, or ask someone to do it for him if he is unable. Interestingly, he says the same applies to a car! Source: Halichas Shlomo 8:31 ...


13

OC 101 (2) and MB s.k.5 and especially 6. MB: One reason not to raise the voice is not to disturb others. Other reasons are to be like the prayer of Channa; to avoid being one of those of little faith who do not believe that HaShem hears prayers uttered quietly and to avoid being like the false prophets who cry out loud to false gods. But the important ...


13

The Mishna Berurah (OC 96 sk 7) rules that if leaving the book on the floor will disturb your kavana (concentration), then you may pick it up in between the different blessings of shmoneh esrei. The Mishna Berura is not explicit about walking, though it does sound like he would permit it. The Be'er Moshe 3:13:6 explicitly permits walking to pick it up if it ...


12

From the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch: ואפילו ללמוד אסור בשעה שהשליח צבור חוזר התפלה "And even learning is forbidden when the Chazzan repeats Shemoneh Esrei. From Daily Jewish Law One should not learn Torah during the repetition of the amidah. There are a few concerns: At least 10 men must pay attention to every word of the amidah; All of ...


12

On a simplistic level, Chochmah is Wisdom. It is an ability or attribute of a person. Bina is Understanding. It is the use of Chochmah to understand something. Daas is Knowledge. It is the acquired idea that one has understood with Chochmah through Binah. But this isn't Hebrew.SE! You want a Jewish Theology answer, else you wouldn't have used the term ...


10

I believe it's to encourage people to actually do it. That's the simplest take-home lesson from the Davening.


10

There is no source for this in the classical Seforim, including the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, Mishna Berura, Tur or Rambam. I have observed many great men in my life and never seen any of them do this. During Kedusha one does not jump, one "lifts oneself and one's heel" (Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 20:4) וכשאומרים קדוש קדוש קדוש, וכן ברוך וימלוך, מרים גופו ...


10

Shu"t Shevet haLevi (V:16) divides this into 3 parts: If the singing is done together with the words of tefilla, this is considered part of tefilla and a kiyum of lezamer leshimcha elyon. Other times, music is considered separate from the tefilla. For example, the nigun is separated from the words and is "too long" or it's not for the davener's tefilla ...


9

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chaim 111:1 states that there should be no Hefsek between Geula and Tefila. Although the Rama says there is no problem answering Amen the accepted custom is that we do not answer Amen after Go'al Yisroel. Both options mentioned are options that are acceptable. Some Shuls the Chazan just says the last word quitely and in some Shuls ...


9

Abudraham, in "Seder Shacharit shel Chol u-Ferushah", says( here, right column, lines 29-38): וכשיגיע ש"ץ ל'מודים' וכורע, כל העם שוחין ואומרין הודאה קטנה המתחלת כמו כן ב'מודים', שאין דרך העבד להודות לרבו ולומר לו 'אדוני אחה' על ידי שליח, אלא כל אדם צריך לקבל בפיו עול מלכות שמים, ואם יקבל על ידי שליח, אינה קבלה גמורה, שיוכל להכחיש ולומר לא ...


8

Since geshem changing to gashem is dependent on whether the word comes at the completion of a phrase (esnachta or sof pasuk), the real question is: Is the ability to make rain a praise in itself (ending the phrase- hagashem), or is it only a praise if it is used to sustain life and must be followed by mechalkel chaim b'chesed (hageshem) There are many in ...


8

Piskei T'shuvos (115:2), citing Maharil, writes that whist striking the chest during s'lach lanu, one should bow his head slightly forward.


8

Yes there is a source. It is MB simon 113 sk 12. Almost the same text is used in Kitzur Shulchan Oruch 18(11). The translation says, "When a person recites Boruch, he should bend the knee, and when he says Attoh, he should bow to the extent that the vertebrae of the spine protrude. He should also bend his head. Before he recites G-d's name, he should return ...


8

Igrot Moshe (OC 3:8) discusses reciting English translations during prayers. He says: ול"ד לניגונים בעלמא שאף שנשמע כעין הברה כיון שאין לההברה שום כוונת דבור אינו הפסק.‏ And it is not similar to regular tunes [niggunim] for even though they sound like phonemes, since the phoneme is in no way intended to be speech, it is not an interruption.


8

According to the Beit Yosef (OC 123; citing Rav Hai Gaon), the custom is based on the idea that the tefillos correspond to the tamid offerings. When the kohen would go up to the altar, he would go up on the right side, go around, and descend on the left side. We face left first, then right, because we are orienting ourselves according to the Shechina's ...


8

The Kaf HaChayim (122:11) quotes the Eliyah Rabbah and the Sidur Nehora for this custom in order not to "forget your name" on the day of judgment. He also quotes Kitzur Shlah in this subject. He also quotes Rashi Micha 6:9 that someone should read a pasuk that begins and ends with the letters of his name every day. I subsequently found a letter from the ...


8

According to Halacha you are not supposed to have a break between Geula and Tefila by Shacharis and Maariv. However by Mincha there is no problem of having a break, therefore we can say this extra Posuk. You may ask then isn't אֲדנָי שפָתַי תִּפְתָּח וּפִי יַגִּיד תְּהִלָּתֶךָ a break. The Gemara in Brachos 4b asks this question and answers אלא התם כיון ...


8

I am a Karaite Jew, born and raised in an Egyptian Karaite Jewish family. I attend Congregation B'nai Israel, the only Karaite synagogue in the United States. I co-authored a primer on Karaite Judaism (As it is Written) and I run a blog on Karaite Judaism (ABlueThread.com). I consider myself Jewish. I consider myself Jewish before considering myself a ...


8

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

Per Aruch Hashulchan Siman 95:5 in the name of the Elya Rabbah it is proper that the feet should remain together after Kedusha until Hakel Hakodesh. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=7705&st=&pgnum=172&hilite= Rav Shlomo Zalmen Auerbach Zatzal (Halichos Shlomo, Tefilah, Perek 8: Ha'arah 60) maintains that on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur ...


7

I have never seen a siddur that has TOras. The correct pronunciation, as far as I know, is toRAS. In general, the only reason a mil'ra word, such as toRAS, would become mil'ail, is if the word following it had its accent on its first syllable. For example, if the term was "toras chesed", it would be "TOras CHEsed", as the accent in "chesed" is on the first ...


7

In Kovetz Ohr Yisroel (Adar II 5763), pp. 239ff, several people suggested alternatives for names, such as Zelig, that don't appear in Tanach. These include: Use a verse that has the letters of the name as the initial or final letters of successive words, whether in order or not. Thus, for example, the spelling זליג appears as successive ends of words in ...


7

There is a long (20 pages) and detailed discussion of this question in the sefer Iyunei Halachos by D. Y Zvi Rabinowitz published in 2003. It includes all the sources that discuss this question and the opinions of the recent poskim. While there is no conclusive answer because there are opinions on both sides of the question, it is certainly worthwhile to ...


7

Yes, this is true. This refers to after you have said the first "yih'yu l'ratzon" and are now in middle of "elokai n'tzor". Different authorities disagree on how you may interrupt, so here's some sources. This website says: "one may answer Amen for Kadish, Kedusha, Barchu (and all the other things permitted Bein HaPerakim of Shema), and according to ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch rules (OC 124:3) קהל שהתפללו וכולם בקיאים בתפלה, אעפ"כ ירד ש"צ וחוזר להתפלל, כדי לקיים תקנת חכמים A congregation which prayed and all of them were adept at praying, even so the leader goes back and repeats the prayer [aloud] in order to fulfill the enactment of the sages. So the Halacha is clear; the question is why? ShmuelBrin ...


7

You shouldn't try to "out do" the loud davener since that would just disturb even more people. Re how to correct the person. This is the category of rebuke that is mentioned in Lev 19:17. The Rabbis and the sources spend considerable time examining how to properly rebuke a person. Some ideas in reference to your situation: I'd do it privately with the ...


7

Rashi explains the difference as follows (Shemos 31:3): וָאֲמַלֵּא אֹתוֹ רוּחַ אֱלֹהִים בְּחָכְמָה וּבִתְבוּנָה וּבְדַעַת וּבְכָל מְלָאכָה - And I have imbued him with the spirit of G-d, with wisdom, with insight, with knowledge, and with [talent for] all manner of craftsmanship with wisdom: [I.e.,] what a person hears from others and learns. ...


7

There's an audio by Rabbi Uziel Milevsky z'tl (former chief rabbi of mexico) on love and marriage which answers this. basically, he points out that in the secular new year people greet each other "happy new year" in the Jewish new year, we don't say "shana semecha" (happy/joyous new year) rather we say "shana tova" (a good year). He explains there, that ...


7

This is a question into which I have done a little bit of research. There are two independent issues: Saying ה שפתי תפתח before the עמידה Taking three steps forward or back or both, which is an issue in itself Saying ה שפתי תפתח is attributed to R. Yohanan in Brakhot 4b והא אמר רבי יוחנן בתחלה אומר ה' שפתי תפתח ולבסוף הוא אומר יהיו לרצון אמרי פי and ...


6

אינו פוסק לא לקדיש ולא לקדשה אלא ישתק ויכון למה שאומר שליח-צבור ויהא כעונה א"ח קד:ז One who is still reciting the Shemoneh Esrei (i.e. has not concluded Sim Shalom/Shalom Rav) should not respond to the shliach tzibur but should pause and listen quietly (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 104:7). If one has concluded the Shemoneh Esrei proper but is still ...



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