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12

The Torah commands us regarding emotions all the time, e.g.: "Don't bear a grudge", "don't hate your fellow in your heart", "don't harbor resentment when you give [charity] to him", "because you didn't serve Hashem your Lord with happiness and a glad heart", "don't despise the Edomite, for he is your brother; don't despise the Egyptian, for you were a ...


8

http://www.chabadyavne.com/contents.asp?fid=82&av=2327 The Piskei Teshuvos 61:5 mentions from the Arizal that the hand has to actually cover the eyes. However the Kloizenberger Rebbe Zatzal held that you may just cover the glasses with your hand. In Chabad they lift the glasses and place the hand on the eyes.


8

The Talmud (Berakhot 13b) is the original source for this custom. Here there is a mention of Rabbi Judah the Prince covering his eyes while he said the Shema to block out the distractions of the students around him. This behavior was codified in the Shulhan Arukh (OH 61:4-5). from ...


7

Love is an emotion and cannot be controlled in that way Which is generally wrong according to R.Desler. At this site I found the citation from his book הרב דסלר זצ"ל בספרו "מכתב מאליהו" (קונטרס החסד), ניסח כך נושא זה: "יותר ממה שהנתינה באה בעקבות האהבה, האהבה באה בעקבות הנתינה". "Love is caused by Giving more than Love causes Giving" So, if ...


7

Chanoch and Ariel K are correct in their answer, but one can answer at greater length and detail. The letters beged kefet, בגד כפת are distinguished from other Hebrew letters in taking a dagesh kal, a 'weak' dagesh, at the start of words or after a shva nach. The function of this dagesh kal is to distinguish between the plosive and fricative versions of the ...


6

We learn from Chana not to raise our voices for tefillah. (One reason given is that we imply that Hashem canot hear us otherwise.) See, for example, Aruch haShulchan 101:2. Shema is not tefillah, it is a declaration.


6

I saw it once at my shul on a Sunday morning. After minyan there is usually some people that learn in the beit midrash afterwards. One time, someone came in and had missed minyan. He put on his tefillin and started davening to himself. When he got to Yishtabach, he klopped on the shulchan and finished it out loud and said barchu. Then he continued to ...


6

The source for Birnbaum's account is Shibbolei Haleket, citing a Geonic teshuvah (and quoted from there in Otzar Hageonim to Megillah 23b). The king is named there as יוזגרד - i.e., Yezdegerd (II) of Persia (ruled 438-457), although there's no mention of spies being there for part of davening and then leaving - on the contrary, the Gaon writes that the ...


5

According to Ben Ish Hai I Miqes (S"Q 7) כשיגיע לק"ש קודם פרשת התמיד יזהר לומר פסוקים שמע ישראל ובשכמל"ו בכונה גדולה כמו ק"ש דיוצר, הן בסגירות עיניו When one reaches the Qeriat Shema prior to Parashat HaTamid he should be scrupulous to say Shema and Baruch Shem with great intention like the Keriat Shema of Yoser (Ohr). Including closing the eyes...


5

According to Yalkut Yosef 58:2 ובתוך זמן קריאת שמע צריך לקרוא את כל הג' פרשיות, ולא רק את הפרק הראשון One must read all three Parashiot. Yalkut Yosef 61:17 ויחיד שקורא קריאת שמע, בשחרית או בערבית, או בקריאת שמע שעל המטה, יסיים בשלש תיבות אלו:''ה' אלהיכם אמת'', כדי להשלים רמ''ח תיבות בקריאת שמע שהן כנגד רמ''ח איבריו של אדם. One should say Emet at ...


5

The minhag to say Hamapil at the end is so the beracha is semucha to (just before) sleep. That is that there should be no hefsek (break) between the beracha and falling asleep. The minhag held by the Gra and other achronim is to day Hamapil first. They reason that the psukim said afterwards are not considered a hefsek. I am basing what I wrote on Siddur ...


5

It is possible to prolong a plosive (stop). You will hear some who are very careful with reading the prayers or the Tora pronounce a dagesh chazak (dagesh forte) as a geminate consonant; this is a longer consonant, and can be done even with a stop. (If you ever hear someone speaking Arabic or Italian (tutto), you can hear geminate stops also. Many other ...


5

Rabbi Avraham Berliner finds a few sources for this: Radak quotes it as a midrash, and we find an allusion to it in Derech Eretz Zuta 1 and in Tshuvos HaGe'onim (Lik) 45.


5

The gemara there also recounts the story of an Amora who specifically stood up in order to show that he was not following the position of Beis Shammai. The Bach in hilchos krias shema (Orech Chaim 63), cited by the mishna berura (same place), rules that one should be careful not to sit down just before shema in order to not give the impression that he is ...


5

Nefesh HaChaim Shaar Gimmel Perek Beis(1): אבל אדון כל ית"ש הוא מלא את כל העולמות והנבראי' ואינם חוצצים חלילה נגדו יתב' כלל באמת. ואין עוד מלבדו ית' ממש שום דבר כלל בכל העולמות. מהעליון שבעליונים עד התהום התחתון שבתהומות הארץ. עד שתוכל לומר שאין כאן שום נברא ועולם כלל רק הכל מלא עצמות אחדותו הפשוט ית"ש. Perek Gimmel(2): שאם ח"ו יקחנו לבנו לקבוע לנו ...


4

Tosfot on Brachot 2a (link) say (quoting Rabbeinu Tam and the Ri) that the essential Kri'at Shma is the one in shul, even though we say Shma while it is still daytime. Rashi, on the other hand, rules that one must repeat the first section of Shma after dark, and the bedtime Kri'at Shma suffices. The Raavyah agrees with Rabbeinu Tam (according to the ...


4

Ma'ase Rav Siman 39 says that the GR"A would not kiss his Tzitzit during Keriyat Shema. The Kovetz Mepharshim (printed on the side in the Weinrab edition) supposes that he did so because he held that when saying the third paragraph of Keriyat Shema one should gaze at his tzitziyot (see biur hagra O"H on Siman 24 seif katan 8), and kissing them breaks his ...


4

I have not the exact halachic sources but read that some poskim considered those kissings during the shema as hefsek, for example : The Vilna Gaon, Chazon Ish, The Steipler, Rav Moshe Feinstein (read there : http://halachafortoday.com/questionsandanswers.aspx) Also I read once that some don't even grasp their tzitzios during shema like for example Rav Chaim ...


4

Rava says that Shema does satisfy the technical requirement to learn Torah each day (a mitzva md'oraysa for men). So that takana must have been trying to accomplish more, probably to have a public reading, perhaps also to learn something new every week. The public reading has its own birchas haTorah on it, so its clearly quite significant. (Some even say its ...


4

I don't believe it says anywhere that you have to put your hand over your eyes. "(They) are accustomed to pace their hands over their face when reading the 1st pasuk so that one won't stare at anything else that will deter him from concentrating." (SA OC 61:5) It isn't clear from the Shulchan Aruch whether it is 1 hand or both. Although the source for ...


4

Your question is a little confusing: are you asking about stress or about vowel quality? So far as stress is concerned, the phrase is pronounced vedibarTA BAM, with a stress on the final syllable of the first word and on the second word as well. (This differentiates it from vediBARta BAM, which would be a perfective: "and you spoke of these things".) So far ...


4

As the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch implies in 17:3, covering one's eyes is done to help one concentrate. Since in "leolam yehey" one usually is not fulfulling the Mitzva of saying Shma, there's no reason to cover one's eyes. However, if one is saying the full Shma in "leolam yehey" due to time constraints, then one should have to cover one's eyes.


4

Kitzur Shulcah Aruch 17:1 says of the Sh'ma: After a third of the day has passed, one should recite the Shema alone, without the blessings, because it is forbidden to recite the blessings beyond this time. The Shema itself, though, may be recited the entire day. (Other authorities also allow the recitation of the blessings throughout the day.) A ...


4

The Sh'ma is a passage from the torah, not specifically a prayer, and in fact when we say it we are technically studying torah (citation needed, sorry). Reading, silently or aloud, passages from Tanakh isn't restricted to Jews, as evidenced by the lack of outcry from Jews when Christians quote our texts all the time. (There may be outcry about their ...


4

This is a Mishnah in Berachos (Perek 1:4) The Brachos are as follows: Morning Shema: The first Bracha starts with "Baruch ata...Yotzer Ohr Uvoreh Chosech..." and ends with "Baruch ata...Yotzer Hameorot" (at the end of "es shem") The Second Bracha Starts with "Ahavas olam ahavtanu..." I believe the exact wording may vary by Nusach, and ends with "Baruch ...


4

שם - a name refers to reputation, or how something is known. טוב שם משמן טוב (Koheles 7:1) means a good reputation is better than oil. One who is מוציא שם רע - וְשָׂם לָהּ עֲלִילֹת דְּבָרִים, וְהוֹצִא עָלֶיהָ שֵׁם רָע (Devarim 22:14) - has created a bad reputation. The idea of a name is that which you use for others to relate to you - one does not ...


3

The Aruch HaShulchan OC 236:12 rules that in between each of the 18 verses of Baruch HaShem Le'Olam is considered like "between the chapters" regarding interruptions, and that during the paragraph begininning Yir'u Eineinu is considered like "in the midst of the chapters" regarding interruptions.


3

In Yiddish, and in contemporary terminology, this is called a vach nacht (night of watching). According to kabbalah, the night before a baby's bris is a time of danger. Therefore, we bring children to give added protection to the uncircumcised child. Additionally, it is a custom for the father of the baby, the sandak, and according to some, the mohel to stay ...


3

Here what I learn from a Rav on the same question : It is written that we should extend the dalet of the word e'had so we not confuse it with a reish (that would give a'her and not e'had). Strange assertion as the nekudot are differents anyway and the sounds are asunder. In fact it could be that this law is part of il'hot sofrim. So it is about writing not ...



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