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Kovaitz Bais Aharon V'Yisroel 103 has the following roundup. Orach Chaim 225:6 a fruit that does not regenerate yearly, you do not make a Shehechiyanu on it. Mishna Berura 225:6:16 says this is for example a Esrog. Mishna Berura 225:6:16:19 refers to the Shaarei Efraim and Mor Uketziya. However Kaf Efraim 225:43 in the name of the Shaar Efraim says one ...


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The Piskei Tshuvos 225:17:footnote 124 brings many shittos who say not to make a shecheyanu.A few: Sidur Yaavetz ,Eishal Avraham,Leket Yosher and more. Some reasons brought are ,its not fit to eat unless its fried and one can't tell between old and new.One already made a brachah on it during the time of its mitzvah and got pleasure from its sight.Another ...


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See this article: Authorities dispute whether the berachah of shehecheyahu is entirely subjective, depending on the subjective joy a person feels, or whether the berachah includes an objective element, whereby if a garment or item is not important, and does not usually induce joy, one cannot recite the blessing. According to the Rosh, the ...


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See here The Mishna (Brachos 9:2) writes that one recites a bracha upon hearing good news, building a new house or buying new items. The Shulchan Aruch (OC 223:6) and Mishna Berura (223:13) explain that this only applies to items that are important and one is particularly happy about acquiring. This applies equally to used items (Shulchan Aruch OC ...


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I was told by a Chabad rabbi in Jerusalem that the custom is to say "shechiyanu" if this is the case, since Purim and Shushan Purim are actually different holidays. I think there's probably room to do it either way, though, since obviously the halakhic principle of "no blessing in case of a doubt" applies here as well.


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The sefer תהלה לדוד discusses at length the various opinions about reciting שהחיינו when eating an esrog, and at the end, he concludes: 1) If one eats an esrog before Succos one may bless on it שהחיינו. And such was the custom of the Sages of Yerushalayim, to bless the brachah of שהחיינו on the second night of Rosh Hashanah. 2) If one eats an esrog ...



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