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8

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chayim 676:1 says that you should recite it on the second night after the regular two b'rachos. The same goes for any subsequent night if it is the first time you are lighting this year. But there are two exceptions to this rule: The first is if he knew on the first night that he was not going to light his own candles, and he ...


8

Matanos laevyonim, mishloach manos, and s'udas purim. Source: Magen Avraham 692:1, cited l'maase in Aruch Hashulchan :2 and Mishna B'rura :1. (More precisely, that's a source for saying shehecheyanu on these mitzvos, not for not making another b'racha on them.)


8

Because in theory you could have said Shehecheyanu when you prepared (bound) your lulav before Sukkos. So even supposing that the second day of Sukkos was the real Yom Tov (and the previous day was actually erev Sukkos), your Shehecheyanu then would still count as the real thing. (By contrast, with kiddush, you're saying the berachah because of the holiday ...


7

The Levush (489, end of 1) writes: 1) It's part of Yom Tov so it's included in the Shehecheyanu of Yom Tov, 2) Since Sefira was in anticipation for Matan Torah which is the main Simcha, it doesn't make sense to say Shehecheyanu on something we are anticipating for before that day arrives! The Ba'er Heitev (5) brings that the reason is that Shehecheyonu is ...


6

Shehechiyuanu is a brikat hashevach. Now I have to explain to you how every instance of shehechiyanu is really recited after the occasion. On seeing a friend after 30 days or hearing good news that benefits only myself (I include here one who heard of rain after a drought): I think we all agree these are after. On acquiring new property: The shulchan ...


6

Say it only during kiddush. The women too should only say it during kiddush. Why would one assume the two would be any different? They are both obligated in kiddush and both obligated to have the lights lit. The Talmud in Sukkah (47b) implies already that the shehechiyanu is said with the kiddush. (The Tur OC 519 deems it an "enactment of [the sages] to say ...


5

Sefardim make a Shecheyanu at a bris. This is also the prevailing custom among Ashkenazim (and everyone else) in Israel. Background: Tosafot (Sukkah 46a, ד"ה העושה) says that we don't make a shecheyanu on a bris, since it is not mentioned as one of the berachot for milah in massechet Menachot. Reason - only make Shehecheyanu on a mitzvah that has simcha ...


4

It has been some time since I looked at the issue, but as I recall the practice is to not recite this blessing, at least not with shem u'malchus (mentioning G-d's name and kingship). This is, in my recollection, at least in part because the blessing was instituted when such journey's could mean that one's friend would not return alive and by seeing them you ...


4

Rav Ovadia Yosef rules in Yechavveh Da'at 4:17 that one would not say a bracha upon seeing someone through video chat. However he does quote one opinion that even allows one to say it upon hearing their voice on the telephone but dismisses it as very unlikely AND because by matters of doubt with brachot we rule to not say the bracha. Depending on which one ...


4

The proper order of these blessings is a machloket between Rav and Rabba bar bar Chana on Sukkah 56a. Rav held the blessing on the Sukkah comes first because it's the obligation of the day and Rabba bar bar Chana held that Shehechiyanu comes first because it is Tadir = said more often. The Rambam (Sukkah 6:2) rules like Rav and Shulchan Aruch does likewise ...


3

The last בעל המאור on פסחים says that we can't make שהחיינו on ספירת העומר because the whole point of the count is to lead to the קרבן שתי הלחם, and being that we don't have the בית המקדש nowadays, counting is just ''אגמת נפש'' for us, and we don't make שהחיינו on things that cause us anguish.


3

This question was asked long before the advent of webcams. The Steipler said that since telephones keep the world connected, one should not recite it.


3

The Shulchan Aruch Harav (OC 600:5-7) explains that although some hold that the two days of Rosh Hashana are considered one day with regards to the brocha shechiyanu, the Halacha is not like them and therefore we make a second shechiyanu the second day by Kiddush and Shofar blowing. [However, we do try and take the opinion into concern and therefore have a ...


3

Shehecheyanu applies to vegetables, too (not just fruits that grow in the ground). Some examples for Israel, in no particular order: spring garlic watermelon melons (the watermelon isn't a true melon) kiwi litchi apricots peaches, plums, nectarines grapes pomegranates figs cherries mangoes carobs hawthorn berries Even if you don't live in Israel, I'm ...


3

How about simply, Besha'ah Tovah!


3

2 that come to mind are: Sukkah where meikar hadin shehecheyanu should be made at the time of the building of the sukkah (Aruch haShulchan b'shem shas bavli, yerushalmi and tosefta 641:3 and Chanukah lights where even if a person will not light himself, he makes the other brachos upon seeing a chanukah light (Shulchan Aruch 676:3 and Aruch haShulchan ...


3

The Magen Avraham says that if one did not have a m'gila one would not say birkas "shehechiyanu". This leads me to believe that if one had not read yet the halacha would be the same. Rav Ya'akov Emden (in Mor Uk'tzi'a) challenges the premise, pointing out that we say the b'racha on Yom Kipur without an action necessarily associated with its recital, and ...


3

Maybe he is being motzei somebody else? Or maybe it is a new, expensive menorah? (I'll just ignore the possibility of international dateline/space travel issues for now)


2

Most Poskim hold he should say Shehechiyanu again as there is a bigger Porsumei Nisah in Shul.


2

The only reason we deliberately have new fruit or clothes is because we're saying it anyway on kidush or lighting: if you're (for whatever reason) not saying it on kidush or lighting, there's no reason to have new fruit or clothes. (Of course, if you do have new fruit or clothes, then you say shehecheyanu, same as on any weekday.) Moreover, saying it at ...


2

First night: say a leisheiv. Then say a shehechiyanu, as that is covering both the yomtov (shehechiyanu is part of the standard kiddush of the first 2 days of pesach and shavuos too), and the new experience of the mitzva of dwelling in the sukkah (just as you'd make a shehechiyanu the first time you take a lulav, but not subsequent times). Second night: ...


2

Kovaitz Bais Aharon V'Yisroel 103 has the following roundup. Orach Chaim 225:6 a fruit that does not regenerate yearly, you do not make a Shehechiyanu on it. Mishna Berura 225:6:16 says this is for example a Esrog. Mishna Berura 225:6:16:19 refers to the Shaarei Efraim and Mor Uketziya. However Kaf Efraim 225:43 in the name of the Shaar Efraim says one ...


2

For Ashkenazim, it seems that an individual cannot buy furniture during the Three Weeks but a couple or a family can: http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5761/matos.html http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5765/matos.html Sefardim disagree and do not allow it: http://dailyhalacha.com/m/halacha.aspx?id=947


2

Taamei Minhagim #973 quotes the Chupat Chatanim (and points you to Likutim Chapter 106) that one does not say Shehecheyanu when preforming Kedushin. This is because one says Shehecheyanu when the action of the Mitzvah completes the Mitzvah (i.e. the act one is doing is in itself a complete Mitzvah), e.g. Lulav. But the main Mitzvah of marriage is ...


2

They say it after the bracha of lights before lighting. see Hagaos Rabbi Akiva Eiger 263:5 who says it has no real source but don't protest women who do it and he quotes the Yaavetz 107 who discusses this. Chacham Ovadia holds that the shehecheyanu is a hefsek and shouldn't be done by lighting.


2

The Piskei Tshuvos 225:17:footnote 124 brings many shittos who say not to make a shecheyanu.A few: Sidur Yaavetz ,Eishal Avraham,Leket Yosher and more. Some reasons brought are ,its not fit to eat unless its fried and one can't tell between old and new.One already made a brachah on it during the time of its mitzvah and got pleasure from its sight.Another ...


1

The sefer תהלה לדוד discusses at length the various opinions about reciting שהחיינו when eating an esrog, and at the end, he concludes: 1) If one eats an esrog before Succos one may bless on it שהחיינו. And such was the custom of the Sages of Yerushalayim, to bless the brachah of שהחיינו on the second night of Rosh Hashanah. 2) If one eats an esrog ...


1

Two points: 1) We know the Mishna Berura is referring to Shehechiyanu because in the Sha'ar HaTziyun sk 3 he explicitly mentions the word "Shehechiyanu". 2) The Aruch HaShulchan (OC 225:2) explicitly differentiates like Rav Ovadiah Yosef: וזהו כשלא היה מכתבים ממנו אליו, אבל כשקבל ממנו מכתב אינו מברך 'מחיה המתים', אבל לעניין 'שהחיינו' אין חילוק, דאפילו ...


1

This is just my own logic: Someone who builds or buys a house says shehecheyanu. It was also common to rent houses (long term as well), but the halacha did not extend to that case. So even though owning one's own house gives simcha, a limited usage doesn't qualify for the bracha. Another interesting take on your question would be a life estate or term ...



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