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9

The very article you link to answers the question! It's permissible to go to sleep on Shabbat in order to be awake after Shabbat, however, one shouldn’t say that one is doing so for that purpose. [Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 28:72]


6

In Tephichas BeDevash 24 by Rav Chiya Pontromili (a Sefardi Rav from the 19th century quoted here) writes: ואף שנהגו ישראל להיות ערים בליל שבועות אפילו שחל בשבת, מכל מקום שונה ליל שבועות מליל שבת, משום שבליל שבועות יש בו סודות גדלים, שעל ידי נדידת השינה ולימוד התורה בעשרה הנעשה באותו הלילה, מתקנים תכשיטים לכלה, וכמה מעלות טובות מפורשות בזוהר הקדוש על ...


5

The Beis HaLevi in Parshas Yisro writes: וכמו שאמרו בבבא מציעא (נט, א) ״לא בשמים היא״, רק היא כמו שמסכימים ב״ד שבזה העולם, וכו'. וזהו שאומרים ״מתן תורתנו״, ולא ״מתן תורה״, דתורתנו הפירוש שנעשית שלנו Shavuos is called the time of Matan Toraseinu - the giving of our Torah, as it is the time when the Torah became ours, and the principle of לא בשמים ...


4

There was a case with a group of shochtim who could not get a minyon for Shacharis on a Monday or Thursday. They were able to meet during their lunch break to have a minyon to lein. Update: Found this reference Can the Torah be read in shul if a minyan is present after the point in the service designated for Torah reading? One Monday there was a mess up ...


4

The Ramchal in Da'as Tevunos siman 158 s.v. ומה שיש לנו לדעת (p. 170 in Friedlander edition) explains that the the spiritual ability to keep the Torah is what was given to the Jewish people at Har Sinai. In the following paragraph, ותראי, he writes: ותראי כי זה מה שעשה האדון ב"ה לישראל בהר סיני, שהנה לא נתן להם שם התורה כולה במעמד ההוא, אבל הייתה הכנה ...


3

I think the end of the question is key. What we call the giving of the Torah is really a code word for us having an ability for a direct relationship with Hashem, in a new reality which fosters us to understand Him better, in a more open way. This way, R' Moshe Shapiro in Thursday night shiur, often cites kabbalistic seforim that the 10 Commandments ...


3

Chanuka is inherently connected to Sukkot where the Musaf offering includes a "countdown" of bulls. Sefirat HaOmer, on the other hand, is a biblical command to count 50 days from the offering of the Korban Omer which only makes sense incrementally since the actual date of the latter korban of the shtei halechem is dependent on that of the former of the omer. ...


2

The question was asked by the Satmer Rav quoted here. As cited there he answered The customs are indeed appropriate. On the day when trees are “judged,” we are interested in determining the success of the tree during the previous year. That is done by assessing what it has produced. On the other hand, when our focus is on the fruit and we want to assess ...


2

A student of R' Yosef Ber Soloveitchik told me that occasionally, when flying in from Boston, he would miss his opportunity to hear kri'as haTorah, and would have a minyan assembled to do so. Apparently, it was done somewhat regularly. So, at least R' Soloveitchik held it was an acceptable thing to do. I was told that this practice is actually taking ...


2

I have seen this done in Israel to make up for people who missed one of the Shabbos parshios due to traveling to Israel during a period when the parshios in Israel and outside of Israel are not synchronized. I also see it after davening for Parshas Zachor for people (usually women) who missed the kiria during davening. I have also seen it on Simchas Torah, ...


2

One answer is that it is juxtaposed with the giving of the Torah - but the giving of the second Tablets on Yom Kippur, not the first tablets on Shavuos. This is explained at length in several places in Chabad Chassidus. One of them is here. The Meshech Chochma says that on Shmini Atzers Zos HaBracha was read anyway. The Talmud which describes reading Zos ...


2

Eating before davening The first issue that can come up is the prohibition to eat before davening shacharit. In many places where groups of people gather to have an all-night learning seder, food is provided. Once the time of alot ha-shachar arrives, one should stop eating or else he has violated the prohibition of eating before davening. Next, there are a ...


2

Probably a reference to אנכי לשון מצרי (Yalkut Shimoni).


1

The Magen Avrohom in O.C. Siman 494 s.v. איתא בזוהר brings down this custom from the Zohar, and writes that כבר נהגו רוב הלומדים לעשות כן, most people learning have accepted this custom. So the custom is sanctioned by the Zohar, dating it to either the Tannaic era or the 13th century, and the Magen Avrohom in the 17th century records that it was already ...


1

The Torah mandates "simcha" on Yom Tov. The Talmud understands "simcha" to refer to eating meat and wine. Hence, the obligation to eat meat on Yom Tov. The exact parameters of this obligation are subject to much debate among the Poskim. The fours assumptions you quote are held by some Rabbis and rejected by others. As always, ask your LOR. The obligation ...



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