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15

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim, 493:2, Rema: ואין להסתפר עד ל"ג בעצמו ולא מבערב. מיהו אם חל ביום ראשון, נוהגין להסתפר ביום ששי לכבוד שבת And it is not permitted to get a haircut [or shave] until the day of the Lag b'Omer itself. However, if it [Lag b'Omer] falls on Sunday, we have a custom to get haircuts [and shave] on Friday, in honor ...


12

As the Rambam states in H. A"Z 12:8: ואינו חייב עד שיגלחנו בתער--שנאמר "ולא תשחית, את פאת זקנך" (ויקרא יט,כז), גילוח שיש בו השחתה; לפיכך אם גילח זקנו במספריים, פטור. ואין המתגלח לוקה, עד שיסייע. One is liable only when one shaves with a razor, as [implied by Leviticus 19:27]: "Do not destroy the corners of your beard." [We can infer that this applies ...


7

Rav Herschel Schachter told me that the reason they do it is because they are afraid that a hair will be left out of the mikveh when they do tevila. To avoid this problem they shave their heads. I have also heard that they suspect that there will be tangles, which are חציצה for the tevila, so they shave their heads. Neither of these reasons would really ...


7

See this page on KosherShaver.org for what looks like a pretty thorough background on all of the issues. Rav Moshe Feinstein understood the aforementioned sugyah in accordance with this latter approach. According to this approach, when the Gemara rules that an item which both destroys and shaves is prohibited, and defined this item as being a razor, it ...


6

Short Version: Rav Yosef Dov Soloveitchik and others are of the opinion that it is permitted for one who regularly shaves to shave, and since it is permitted it is a mitzva to do so, so as not to look disgraceful on chol hamoed (Source). Rav Moshe Feinstein makes a similar argument in Igrot Moshe OC I 163. Long Version: The Mishna in Moed Katan 3:1 (page ...


5

From here: The Shulchan Aruch prohibits shaving (Simon 531:2, SS”K 66:23) and it is the prevalent custom. Rav Moshe Feinstein (Ig”M O"C vol. I simon 163) discusses this issue at length and many are accustomed to be lenient based on the Nodah Biyhuda. Rav Moshe Feinstein concludes that he is not accustomed to be lenient unless in certain cases or for ...


5

See Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 16 page 5: When Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday (as it does this year) shaving etc. is permitted on Friday because of kovod for Shabbos. The reason why it is kovod for Shabbos is because by the mincha before Lag B’omer one does not say tachnun, so technically shaving would permitted on Shabbos, but since one can ...


4

Chok Yaakov 7, Shulchan Aruch Harav 5, Chayei Adom 131:11, Mishnah Berurah 5, Aruch Hashulchan 6, L’Torah V’horah 2: page 19:2 quoting the opinion of Harav Moshe Feinstein, zt’l, Rivevos Ephraim 6: page 294:2, Orchos Rabbeinu 2: page 95:11, see Chok Yaakov 7. This is even according to the Sefardim (Bais Dovid 208). Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday in the ...


4

Going back to the KosherShavers page, footnote 23 ( http://www.koshershaver.org/why.htm#_ftn23) makes it clear that R. Henkin has a written tshuva on the matter: כתבי הגר"י הענקין ח"ב דף רמ"ד בענין גדילת הזקן (And R. Henkin was the major posek in the US during his lifetime -- only after he passed away did R. Moshe take on that role. So that should satisfy ...


3

The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes that he didn't hear any explicit instructions with regards to trimming a mustache (in the footnote it mentions that the discussion is only when the mustache impedes ones eating, though I don't know the source of this footnote). Moreover, there are logical reasons to forbid as well as to permit. Therefore, he suggests asking ...


2

In light of all the edits to the question... In order to forbid trimming the hair of the mustache you would have to assume that it is forbidden due to the prohibition of lo tilbash (loosely: men can't perform "women's" actions and vice versa) and that lo tilbash still applies to shaving despite the fact that the majority of men in the world shave their ...


2

This answer is not an Halakha The issur of shaving needs two conditions : to destroy the hair to use a blade Since the laser is not a blade, it could be allowed to use it. As it is allowed to use depilatory cream. However, there are other reasons to not remove one's hair. You can see this link for further details.


2

Borrowing from this answer, which quoted from this site (and setting aside the discussion of electric razors, because they are not the topic at hand): Rav Moshe Feinstein understood the aforementioned sugyah in accordance with this latter approach. According to this approach, when the Gemara rules that an item which both destroys and shaves is ...


2

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus2 3:1 says that the prohibition of cutting hair beyond 30 days is only for a parent, which requires one to be told that he looks unkempt prior to taking a haircut. For one who is mourning a child or sibling the prohibition is only for 30 days and then may cut his hair immediately after the 30 days whenever he wants because the Aveilus ...


1

In theory, the "lift-and-cut" is lifting the hair from under the skin's surface and therefore cutting below the surface of the skin. This is what a razor does (based on the motion of how it drags the skin), whereas a scissor never goes below the surface. I must observe that Rabbi Moshe Feinstein's grandson-in-law and student, Rabbi Shabtai Rappoport ...


1

The Ezras Torah calendar in which the laws are supposed to be based of the opinions of Rabbi Yosef Eliyahu Henkin, gives permission to groom on the Friday before Lag B'Omer but not on the Friday before the three days of hagbalah. I would assume the the difference is because in the latter case the Friday is Rosh Chodesh and many prohibit grooming on any Rosh ...


1

Rabbi Y. Farkash writes in Chol Homoed Kehilchoso (pg 120) that גילוח is not limited to the beard (contrary to popular usage of the term) and includes the hair of the head. In footnote 5 he cites Tosfos Moed Koton 14a "Umenuda", as well as bringing your proof that S.A. and poskim uses the term גילוח by a minor.


1

One of the many reasons to not shave or trim a beard, is because Chesed of Hashem grows through the hair on the face, and by cutting your beard you may affect your 'reception' of Hashem's Chesed. The question then is if the mustache counts as part of the beard. Arguments exist for and against the mustache being part of the beard. Those kabbalists who say ...


1

Source: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 122: During the 3 week you can shave/haircut if: You're a Mohel, Sandek or father a boy having a Bris Until Rosh Chodesh, for somebody whose Shloshim ended on or after 18 Tamuz (KSA 122:14) You can trim your mustache if it interferese with your eating (KSA 122:4)



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