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18

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 493:2, Rema: ואין להסתפר עד ל"ג בעצמו ולא מבערב. מיהו אם חל ביום ראשון, נוהגין להסתפר ביום ששי לכבוד שבת And it is not permitted to get a haircut [or shave] until the day of the Lag b'Omer itself. However, if it [Lag b'Omer] falls on Sunday, we have a custom to get haircuts [and shave] on Friday, in honor of ...


13

As the Rambam states in H. A"Z 12:8: ואינו חייב עד שיגלחנו בתער--שנאמר "ולא תשחית, את פאת זקנך" (ויקרא יט,כז), גילוח שיש בו השחתה; לפיכך אם גילח זקנו במספריים, פטור. ואין המתגלח לוקה, עד שיסייע. One is liable only when one shaves with a razor, as [implied by Leviticus 19:27]: "Do not destroy the corners of your beard." [We can infer that this applies ...


9

See this page on KosherShaver.org for what looks like a pretty thorough background on all of the issues. Rav Moshe Feinstein understood the aforementioned sugyah in accordance with this latter approach. According to this approach, when the Gemara rules that an item which both destroys and shaves is prohibited, and defined this item as being a razor, it ...


8

Short Version: Rav Yosef Dov Soloveitchik and others are of the opinion that it is permitted for one who regularly shaves to shave, and since it is permitted it is a mitzva to do so, so as not to look disgraceful on chol hamoed (Source). Rav Moshe Feinstein makes a similar argument in Igrot Moshe OC I 163. Long Version: The Mishna in Moed Katan 3:1 (page ...


7

Rav Herschel Schachter told me that the reason they do it is because they are afraid that a hair will be left out of the mikveh when they do tevila. To avoid this problem they shave their heads. I have also heard that they suspect that there will be tangles, which are חציצה for the tevila, so they shave their heads. Neither of these reasons would really ...


6

Going back to the KosherShavers page, footnote 23 ( http://www.koshershaver.org/why.htm#_ftn23) makes it clear that R. Henkin has a written tshuva on the matter: כתבי הגר"י הענקין ח"ב דף רמ"ד בענין גדילת הזקן (And R. Henkin was the major posek in the US during his lifetime -- only after he passed away did R. Moshe take on that role. So that should satisfy ...


6

The Rama himself actually forbids haircuts starting on the 17th of Tammuz (ShA OC 551:4). In his Darkei Moshe, he cites Minhagim Tirna on Tammuz (written ~1400 CE) which mentions this custom.


5

See Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 16 page 5: When Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday (as it does this year) shaving etc. is permitted on Friday because of kovod for Shabbos. The reason why it is kovod for Shabbos is because by the mincha before Lag B’omer one does not say tachnun, so technically shaving would permitted on Shabbos, but since one can ...


5

Footnote 61 of Halachically Speaking Volume 7, Issue 5 (PDF) says: Chok Yaakov 7, Shulchan Aruch Harav 5, Chayei Adom 131:11, Mishnah Berurah 5, Aruch Hashulchan 6, L’Torah V’horah 2: page 19:2 quoting the opinion of Harav Moshe Feinstein, zt’l, Rivevos Ephraim 6: page 294:2, Orchos Rabbeinu 2: page 95:11, see Chok Yaakov 7. This is even according to the ...


5

From here: The Shulchan Aruch prohibits shaving (Simon 531:2, SS”K 66:23) and it is the prevalent custom. Rav Moshe Feinstein (Ig”M O"C vol. I simon 163) discusses this issue at length and many are accustomed to be lenient based on the Nodah Biyhuda. Rav Moshe Feinstein concludes that he is not accustomed to be lenient unless in certain cases or for ...


5

A written (albeit 2nd hand) source for R. Moshe is in the Sefer Meged Giv'os Olam of his longtime student R. Michel Shurkin. He discusses the view of R. Moshe at length in chelek one starting on page 94, and is in turn quoted by R. Ovadiah in Yabia Omer (vol. 9 YD ch. 10 #18) R. Moshe remarked (as quoted there) that he didn't include this in Igros Moshe ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus2 3:1 says that the prohibition of cutting hair beyond 30 days is only for a parent, which requires one to be told that he looks unkempt prior to taking a haircut. For one who is mourning a child or sibling the prohibition is only for 30 days and then may cut his hair immediately after the 30 days whenever he wants because the Aveilus ...


4

I heard in the name of the Ben Ish Hai that the mustache isn't allowed to cover the lips because it is Meakev the Tefila. The Arizal would even trim his mustache so he could eat (Taame HaMiswot pg. 195).


4

The Mishna Berura (OC 551 sk 32) rules that one may shave or take a haircut to look nice for Shabbat if one generally does that action at least once a week.


4

The Teshovas Harashba (1:407) says YES!! That is Nazirus is only the Hair on His Head all else is fair game!!


4

The same logic used with an electric shaver would apply here. If it's not "razor-sharp", it's fine. There are a few different definitions; Rabbi Heinemann of the Star-K, shlit'a, in the name of R' Moshe Feinstein suggests taking a whisker from someone's beard, and seeing whether the cutter can cut it the same way a razor would. Hagaon R' Moshe Feinstein ...


3

Source: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 122: During the 3 week you can shave/haircut if: You're a Mohel, Sandek or father a boy having a Bris Until Rosh Chodesh, for somebody whose Shloshim ended on or after 18 Tamuz (KSA 122:14) You can trim your mustache if it interferese with your eating (KSA 122:4)


3

As mentioned by Curiouser, many פוסקים, including R’ Yosef Eliyahu Henkin, felt that the foil of a shaver differentiates it from a razor. Likewise, R’ Pesach Zvi Frank allowed electric shavers. R’ Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (הליכות שלמה דף יא.) felt that people who use them rely on R’ Chaim Ozer Grodzinski, who famously permitted them, too (See תשובות והנהגות ...


3

On this page you can download the picture where it brings all the opinions with pictures as to where exactly those five points are.


3

The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes that he didn't hear any explicit instructions with regards to trimming a mustache (in the footnote it mentions that the discussion is only when the mustache impedes ones eating, though I don't know the source of this footnote). Moreover, there are logical reasons to forbid as well as to permit. Therefore, he suggests asking ...


3

Nit'e Gavriel, Pesach volume 3, chapter 49, has quite a bit to say about this with respect to the semimourning period during s'firas haomer. I'll list some of his points: 2. Included in the prohibition on haircutting is cutting the beard, body hair, and hair inside. 3. One can cut a moustache that interferes with eating, or never-married girls' hair ...


3

This should answer your question: The custom of refraining from haircuts during the sheloshim is generally applied even to shaving, but there is some room to distinguish between them, because shaving (which is done daily) does not involve the festive nature of a haircut. In addition, it is possible that reasons of losing one’s parnasah will ...


3

Excerpt from a Star K article about shavers: Hagaon R' Moshe Feinstein זצ"ל was of the opinion that the גמרא 's statement - איזהו גילוח שיש בו השחתה הוי אומר זה is teaching us that only the תער , the straight-edged razor, is the Torah's forbidden form of השחתה and גילוח . Any other method of השחתה and גילוח would be permitted. Based on this ...


2

In light of all the edits to the question... In order to forbid trimming the hair of the mustache you would have to assume that it is forbidden due to the prohibition of lo tilbash (loosely: men can't perform "women's" actions and vice versa) and that lo tilbash still applies to shaving despite the fact that the majority of men in the world shave their ...


2

This answer is not an Halakha The issur of shaving needs two conditions : to destroy the hair to use a blade Since the laser is not a blade, it could be allowed to use it. As it is allowed to use depilatory cream. However, there are other reasons to not remove one's hair. You can see this link for further details.


2

Borrowing from this answer, which quoted from this site (and setting aside the discussion of electric razors, because they are not the topic at hand): Rav Moshe Feinstein understood the aforementioned sugyah in accordance with this latter approach. According to this approach, when the Gemara rules that an item which both destroys and shaves is ...


2

The rule applies to hair anywhere on the body (Nit'e Gavriel, Pesach volume 3, chapter 49, paragraph 2, page 279; see that chapter for exceptions, but pubic hair is explicitly not excepted).


2

I asked this question to Rabbi Belsky one time and he said It's fine. He said clipping with a nail clipper is like cutting with a scissor, not like shaving with a razor. I then mentioned that my concern stemmed from the Ramma who brings a gezeira from the Trumas Hadeshen that when using a scissor, the blade resting on one's face cannot be moved to do the ...


2

Yes, absolutely. It doesn't cut beneath the skin, and none of its individual components are sharp enough to cut a whisker.



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