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"One must make the blessings 'that I was not made a Non-Jew', 'that I was not made a slave', and 'that I was not made a woman', for each one has an additional praise. First one says 'that I was not made a Non-Jew' who is not obligated in the commandments at all, and after that '...slave' who is obligated in some commandments, and after that '...woman' who is ...


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The שלמי חגיגה in 6:(4) (starting on page 30) has 2 long pieces discussing this – and from what I understand, women and Eved Knani are incidentally similar in their obligations. (Not completely incidental, as their dispensations have the same source: both the Eved Knani and the Married Woman have another Boss besides for the Torah. He discusses that too.) ...


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I've heard that if you were to say: "thanks G-d, you made me a man!" would imply "now I'm a man! -- i.e. dignified, important, everything I'm supposed to be -- and many/most of us aren't there yet. G-d says that He intends to create humanity in His likeness. The Sforno says that it's up to us to determine how G-d-like we will be.


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As sam alludes, the Talmud (Eruvin 17b) concludes that it is better for a person if he was not created. Therefore, the sages did not want to establish a blessing thanking Hashem for creating a person, so it is phrased in the negative. Even though we say a blessing on bad things just as much as positive (Mishna Brachos 9:5), however here the point is to ...


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I am basing this off of a tape I heard from R' Dovid Orlofsky - he did not cite his source, but a close student of his told me that a lot of what he says is from HaRav Moshe Shapiro. If we would say "thank you for making me a Jew" in the positive, it would put a certain focus on us as filling that role, as if we were living up to everything that that ...


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The Brachos of "shLo asani Goy, Eved, and Ishah " are one group and we are thanking Hashem for obligating us in Mitzvot as each one has more obligations than the other. It has nothing to do with thanking Hashem for creating them the gender they were born as. So the bracha is "Thank you Hashem for making me obligated in even time bound Mitzvot" and not ...


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If you look into the morning brachos (prayes) it first says: 1) Thanks for not making me gentile. 2) Thanks for not making servant. 3) Thanks for not making me woman (for men). So it is progressive statement of what the person is not. That is because a Jewish man has much more obligations towards God than a Jewish woman. Both have much more obligations ...



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