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13

Per Rabbi Aaron Gamliel in the Sefer Matei Aharon, the words Yitzchok & Rivka = Tefila (יצחק רבקה" בגימטריא "תפלה") and per the Raya Mehemna Zohar Chadash Vol 3, page 223:1 & page 253:1 the Shechina is also called Tefila since the whole purpose of Tefila is to connect to Hashem, like the name Naftali (נפתולי אלקים נפתלתי). In Bereishis 25:21 it says ...


11

The following are the earliest times, not necessarily lechatechila; Birchos Hashachar- even in the middle of the night, excepting hanosen lasechvi (machlokes) (if you will return to bed there are other modifications) Korbanos- amud hashachar (if they mention the actual korbanos, otherwise you can say them before that) P'sukei d'zimra- amud hashachar ...


9

R. Yitzchak Abadi has told me that it's no problem, at any point in the prayers. There is also no need to make a shehakol if one is drinking the water for the sole purpose of lubricating one's throat. Shehakol is only recited on water when the drinking serves the purpose of quenching one's thirst (see Shulchan Aruch OC 204:7).


8

Jastrow (page 375) on the word ותיק: And then from Vatikin as a description of the men who did this -> the practice. I think Mishnaic Hebrew, with a comparison to Arabic and Biblical Hebrew.


8

Rabbi Yosef Avraham Heller, the Rosh Kollel of Crown Heights, Brooklyn and former member of the Beis Din there, wrote a essay explaining the Halachic justification for davening after Chatzos, published in "Kobetz Beis Chayenu" 11 Nissan 5760 pg. 28. The crunch of the explanation is as follows: The Gemora (Brochos 26a) states that, "He may go on praying ...


7

Levush (Orach Chaim 488:1) says that we start with הא-ל בתעצומות on Yom Tov, because all of them are "in remembrance of the Exodus from Egypt," when Hashem displayed His mighty power. He also says (ibid. 584:1) that we start with המלך on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (and change the wording to המלך יושב, "the King is sitting"), because these are the times ...


7

To address your first question, the Shulchan Aruch HaRav Orach Chaim 24:4 quotes the Magen Avraham 24:1 (who is quoting the Kitvei Ha-AriZal) to the effect that when one gets to Parshat Tzitzit one should hold the Tzitzit in his hand and look at them until he gets to "נֶאֱמָנִים וְנֶחֱמָדִים לָעַד". Then he should kiss them and remove them from his hand. ...


7

There is a book called שער הכולל that aims to explain the choices made in that version of the siddur. The author notes the following in regard to the phrase ובין איש לאשתו (chapter 1, paragraph 19): במשנה שלפנינו לא נמצאו התיבת הללו אבל בסדר היום ובשער השמים משל״ה מביאים הלשון הזה גם בתד״א פי״ג לענין אהרן הכהן מביא זה הלשון בין אדם לחבירו ובין איש ...


7

First, the entire Pesukei Dezimra can be skipped (Start with Birchas Krias Shema). Because the purpose of Pesukei Dezimra is to make the Tefilah desirable to Hashem, and praying with a Minyan accomplishes this more. If there is time, add in Baruch Sheamar, the whole Ashrei*, and Yishtabach, because the Chachamim established the Pesukei DeZimra around ...


6

The blessing is said immediately before putting on the Talit Katan. Code of Jewish Law Siman 9:8: Regarding all mitzvos, one recites the blessing upon the mitzvah preceding its performance. This means that the blessing should be made prior to carrying out the mitzvah and immediately after one recites the blessing, one must do the mitzvah, without any ...


6

Shulchan Aruch (89:6) writes that one may not start learning Torah after Alos but limits this prohibition to someone who will also daven at home. The concern is that he may get involved in his learning and miss the time for Tefillah. However, if he regularly davens with a minyan and certainly if he in a location where the minyan will gather there (Mishne ...


6

Your question is an interesting one. I researched this article on The Be'urei Hatefilah site (I highly recommend it, as it's one for the best resources on the web for Tefillah-related articles and insights.) My understanding is that there is some controversy. I recommend you read the whole article, but I will excerpt Sefer Avudraham - Dinei Kri'at ...


5

Hayom Yom (compiled by the Lubavitcher Rebbe from talks by his Father in Law, the previous Rebbe) says: When my grandmother, Rebbetzin Rivka, was eighteen (in 5611, 1851) she fell ill and the physician ordered her to eat immediately upon awakening. She, however, did not wish to eat before davening; so she davened very early, then ate breakfast. When her ...


5

As jake pointed out in his comment, if you'll be arriving by 9 AM, then just daven when you reach your destination. If you're going to be on the road during the entire timeframe for Shacharis, though, then you can stop for just Shema and Shemoneh Esrei (those shouldn't take more than 10-15 minutes or so), and say the rest of Shacharis while driving. (It is ...


5

Biur Halacha 113 (hakoreah) says it is based on Divrei haYamim I 29:20: וַיֹּאמֶר דָּוִיד לְכָל-הַקָּהָל, בָּרְכוּ-נָא אֶת-יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם; וַיְבָרְכוּ כָל-הַקָּהָל, לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲבֹתֵיהֶם, וַיִּקְּדוּ וַיִּשְׁתַּחֲווּ לַיהוָה, וְלַמֶּלֶךְ. And David said to all the congregation: 'Now bless the LORD your God.' And all the congregation blessed the ...


5

There is precedent to interrupt mid-davening for a mitzva or for needs of the community. These announcements were actually made right after Yishtabach. Examples in the Shulchan Aruch and Rema (54:3) include: Community needs Tzedaka allocations Blessing an ill person Demanding a fellow congregant show up in court (I think the idea was to pressure him ...


5

Here is a great resource which goes over many details about Baruch Sheamar However, to answer your question directly, no Baruch Sheamar is not in the Gemora. However it is in one of the earliest siddurim that we have, from Rav Amram Hagaon. The bracha was added to our davening during the times of the Geonim, and likely was based on the Hecklaot ...


5

According to Yalkut Yosef 58:2 ובתוך זמן קריאת שמע צריך לקרוא את כל הג' פרשיות, ולא רק את הפרק הראשון One must read all three Parashiot. Yalkut Yosef 61:17 ויחיד שקורא קריאת שמע, בשחרית או בערבית, או בקריאת שמע שעל המטה, יסיים בשלש תיבות אלו:''ה' אלהיכם אמת'', כדי להשלים רמ''ח תיבות בקריאת שמע שהן כנגד רמ''ח איבריו של אדם. One should say Emet at ...


5

According to Ben Ish Hai I Miqes (S"Q 7) כשיגיע לק"ש קודם פרשת התמיד יזהר לומר פסוקים שמע ישראל ובשכמל"ו בכונה גדולה כמו ק"ש דיוצר, הן בסגירות עיניו When one reaches the Qeriat Shema prior to Parashat HaTamid he should be scrupulous to say Shema and Baruch Shem with great intention like the Keriat Shema of Yoser (Ohr). Including closing the eyes...


5

Kitzur Shulcah Aruch1 17:1 says of the Sh'ma: After a third of the day has passed, one should recite the Shema alone, without the blessings, because it is forbidden to recite the blessings beyond this time. The Shema itself, though, may be recited the entire day. (Other authorities also allow the recitation of the blessings throughout the day.) A ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 89:5) discusses what to do if you were eating before dawn (alot hashachar; the earliest time for Shacharit), and then dawn happened (and now you are obligated in Shacharit): must you stop eating or not. It seems from here that you are allowed to eat so long as dawn has not happened. The Mishna Berura there notes that if the eating is ...


5

The Mishna Brurah 8:4 brings the Bach who holds one should cover the heads with the tallis which brings yiras shamayim.The Mishna Brurah in hilchos hikon tefillah(I think siman 91,or 90,he brings that one should cover his face with the tallis during shemoneh esri.There are numerous sources which say to cover the head with a tallis.The Ben Ish Chai in Hilchos ...


5

The Magen Avraham in Shuchan Aruch siman 53:4 says that an individual who reaches Yishtabach should say it right away.


5

As far as I know, "Shachar" - is a name of a star. When it get placed somewhere in the sky - halachikaly the day begins. I've just found out here that Venus is named Shachar.


5

According to the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (21:6), you'd say it in the second prayer, not in the first. אם שכח ערבית במוצאי שבת מתפלל שחרית שתים ואומר בתפילת התשלומין אתה חוננתנו לפי שמעיקר התקנה צריך להבדיל בתפילה If one forgot to say Maariv on Motsa'ei Shabbat, he prays two Shemoneh Esreis in Shacharit and says "Atah Chonantanu" in the compensatory ...


5

If you look into the morning brachos (prayes) it first says: 1) Thanks for not making me gentile. 2) Thanks for not making servant. 3) Thanks for not making me woman (for men). So it is progressive statement of what the person is not. That is because a Jewish man has much more obligations towards God than a Jewish woman. Both have much more obligations ...


5

This statement is inaccurate: On Tisha b'Av and Yom Kippur, we are not supposed to lave our hands. As we learn in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן קכד - הלכות תשעה באב laving hands and getting wet in general is not a problem, if not done for pleasure: וְאֵינָהּ אֲסוּרָה רַק רְחִיצָה שֶׁל תַּעֲנוּג. אֲבָל שֶׁלֹּא לְתַעֲנוּג, מֻתָּר. וְלָכֵן רוֹחֵץ ...


5

The custom is not to exempt the homeless, it's for pirsumei nisa; while nobody would notice candles during the day if they're by someone's house, today the lighting of Chunnukah candles in shul is noticeable enough that, while there's certainly no obligation to do so, the custom developed to light there as well. The Pri Megadim (Eishel Avraham 670:2), ...


4

As the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch implies in 17:3, covering one's eyes is done to help one concentrate. Since in "leolam yehey" one usually is not fulfulling the Mitzva of saying Shma, there's no reason to cover one's eyes. However, if one is saying the full Shma in "leolam yehey" due to time constraints, then one should have to cover one's eyes.


4

In times of plenty, there is a risk of losing sight of Hashem and abandoning Judaism. Sustaining us in plenty, means that even when things were good, and the Jewish people were not being forced into otherness by the evils around them, Hashem kept them together and faithful. "Times of plenty" can be referring to the wealth of the nation that the Jews are ...



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