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1

Not eating for less than an hour is not called fasting. Other prohibitions that would contradict Shabbat are not in force during "bein hashemashos" (the time between sunset and nightfall) e.g. we do not change out of our Shabbat clothes, we continue to wear leather shoes (which is forbidden on Tisha B'Av). Not only that, but any week, if someone is not in ...


0

There are two shkias - the regular shkia and Rabbeinu Tam's shkia, which is 58.5 minutes after the regular shkia. Since we are dealing with a safek issur kares, you must be stringent and therefore you may not light candles even a millisecond after the regular shkia, and to do so is a safek issur kares.


-1

If for health reasons you cannot eat bread, it's OK. If eating bread will harm your health or make you sick, OK. But if you are just "dieting," there is no exemption for that - and, by the way, all you have to eat is one or two slices of bread, which will not hurt your diet.


-2

There is a doubt at sunset if it is day or night according to one opinion. So at sunset it might be shabbat or it might be over. So we treat it with stringencies of both shabbat and tisha'bav.


1

Rav Aharon Mazuz from Yeshivat Kisei Rachamim was asked the following question: Is the permission to run on Shabbos for a mitzvah relevant if there is a reason for it like trying to be one of the first ten in synagogue or is it alright to run for a mitzvah on Shabbos in all cases. The Rav answers: הרב המשיב: הרב אהרן מאזוז שליט"א. 1. עצם מה שאדם רץ ...


0

A source, as a footnote to the previous answers: Mishna Megila 3, 4: רֹאשׁ חֹדֶשׁ אֲדָר שֶׁחָל לִהְיוֹת בְּשַׁבָּת, קוֹרִין בְּפָרָשַׁת שְׁקָלִים (שמות ל). חָל לִהְיוֹת בְּתוֹךְ הַשַּׁבָּת, מַקְדִּימִין לְשֶׁעָבַר וּמַפְסִיקִין לְשַׁבָּת אַחֶרֶת. בַּשְּׁנִיָּה , זָכוֹר (דברים כה). If the first day of Adar falls on Shabbat, they read Parashat ...


3

On the Shabas before Purim, we read the regular weekly parasha, which varies; next year (2017 Gregorian, 5777 Jewish) it will be T'tzave. Most weeks, after concluding the regular weekly parasha, we repeat the last part of it; this second time around is commonly called "maftir". Some special weeks, we read a section of the Torah relevant to that week as ...


0

Parshat Zachor . See this Wikipedia article for more info.


2

Loewian was right in his answer, but it can be fleshed out a lot more. If one looks at general (non-Jewish) culture, there is a name for this part of the bread. It is the heel of the loaf, or the butt of the loaf. And it is also a widespread general (non-Jewish) practice not to eat the heel of the loaf. See for example here and here, out of many, many ...


0

The Taamei ha'Minhagim also suggests the reason is bakers used to stick down the end of the challah with saliva so it was a health-risk to eat the ends.


0

I grew up with the tradition that my mother ate the end piece of the challa. We were told that it was a segula for fertility, but maybe the link to the women's mitzva of hafrashas challa is closer to the truth.


-1

Heard reason we don't eat challah end pieces is to remind us of the mitzvah of Hafroshas Challah


1

You may want to search Google Books for "Eruv." E.g., Contemporary Eruv by Bechhofer (2002)


0

Yes and no. The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes exactly on this topic in Likutei Sichos, Volume 31, second parshas Mishpatim. The non-Jew must keep the Sheva Mitzvot Bnei Noach. He is considered like a Ger Toshav eved/sachir. He must rest on Shabbat, but may do melachas for himself. He is not in the geder of shabbos goy.


2

Objects in this category are called "keilim she'm'lachtam l’issur," which means--according to this nice overview of Shabbos 123-124--they may be moved if and only if one needs them (l'tzorech gufo) or the place they are occupying (l'tzorech mikomo) for a Shabbos-approved use. (Cf. "keilim she'm'lachtam l'heter," which refers to items that may additionally be ...


5

Rabbi J Sacks in the Koren Siddur refers to the gemoro Shabbos 119a where Rabbi Chanino stood on the eve of Shabbos and said, “Come let us go and welcome the Shabbos Queen” etc. The mystics in Safed in the late sixteenth century developed the idea of saying extra psalms to welcome the Shabbos. Rabbi Shlomo Alkabets compose the song, “Lecho Dodi”. This ...


3

I had thought the answer was "absolutely yes" (i.e., you cannot pet even your own dog on Shabbos), but I checked two of my Shabbos seforim and the Internet and found a bit of nuance. Volume 2, Part V of The Concise Code of Jewish Law: Compiled from the Kitzur Shulhan Aruch and Traditional Sources by Rabbi Gersion Appel says this: "All animals including ...


1

In “The Halochos of Muktzah” page 118 Rabbi Bodner says that animals are muktza. On page 9, Rabbi Bodner says “Items which are muktza may not be moved or eaten. They may be touched, however, providing this does not cause them to move.” So you see that animals can be touched as long as that does not make them move. In “Shemirath Shabbath” Rabbi ...


1

Yes, something similar is ruled regarding Birkat Hamazon. See Bet Yosef Orach Chayim siman 180, paragraph 5. here is some quotes of Bet yosef and Shulchan aruch and Acharonim. כתב הרוקח בסימן של"ב מכסין סכין בשעת ברכת המזון על שם "לא תניף עליהם ברזל" (דברים 27, 5). במכילתא (פרשה י"א הלכה ח') אינו דין שיניף וכו' המקצר המקצר על המאריך ושלחן כמזבח בשילהי ...



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