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3

I'm the developer of this app and Salmononius2 is spot on. I never really considered it but I guess this could be an issue for non strictly observant users... Will try to add a 'Bli Neder' mention at some point Enjoy the app and Shabbat Shalom Jeremy


3

Sechita is a term that derives from the labor category of dash, threshing. The technical definition is "removing a product from its natural container." This therefore includes: Removing a wheat kernel from its husk Squeezing grapes for juice Milking a cow And somewhat differently, Wringing out a wet rag. Apparently water absorbed into a porous material ...


4

As with many questions, we can say that it is a machlokes. The Rambam says that it is from the Torah while Rabbeinu Tam says that it is rabbinic. Havdalah in Davening . Is havdalah a biblical or rabbinic obligation? Opinion of the Rambam. The Rambam (Hilchot Shabbat 29:1) writes that the biblical commandment of “zachor et yom hashabbat l’kadsho” ...


-1

Orach Chaim 329:1 clearly says that it is Doche Shabbos. See also Vechai Bahem.


0

"Do you know Hilchos Shabbos" by Rabbi M. Fletcher is a very family-friendly sefer. http://www.menuchapublishers.com/do-you-know-hilchos-shabbos.html For a more thorough, and still easy understandable sefer on Hilchos Shabbos, I highly recommend the Sefer "Zachor Veshamor" by Rabbi E. Falk ...


0

My speculative, unresearched reason for this custom is that it's based on the Gemara and Shulchan Arukh's edict to eat foods which increase sperm on Friday night. In medieval times, it was believed that chickpeas was one such food. Interestingly, based on the sources brought down in Mishna B'rura, we may also explain why the chickpeas are served with black ...


1

We already know of the use of Shabbat elevators is considered by many to be halachically okay. Thus, using an escalator would fall under the same territory. So long as the rider doesn't have control to change the direction or speed of the mechanical device or otherwise force a change in the power used, no problem. On a less halachic note, the ideal of ...


1

In the weekday the Shliach Tzibur leads with leading phrases, לעמתם משבחים ואומרים, facing them [the other angels] praise and they say, and ובדברי קדשך כתוב לאמר, and in the words of your holy ones it is written. These phrases are preparations for the coming sentence. Since these are merely leading into the next stanza some have the Minhag that only the ...


1

Isaiah 58:13 reads: אִם-תָּשִׁיב מִשַּׁבָּת רַגְלֶךָ, עֲשׂוֹת חֲפָצֶךָ בְּיוֹם קָדְשִׁי [I, God, will be happy] if you pause your feet on the Sabbath, and don't deal with your [business] matters on my holy day. This is why it's not in the spirit of the day to talk business on Shabbos. However the Gemara says the prohibition is on "chafatzecha" -- ...


1

As to your first question -- it's the 19th chapter of Tractate Shabbat (starting on page 130); known as "Rabbi Eliezer d'Milah."


1

If the Torah had said ממצוא חפץ, it would mean that any דיבור חול would be asur. But now that the torah says ממצוא חפצך, we learn that your 'things', that is, which are not mitzvot are asur, but חפצי שמים, which is anything that is a mitzva, is mutar. By the way, the gemara in the first part of the page gave a bunch of examples: calculations for money for ...


2

For years, my family used the English edition of Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchasa. My father would read, and all members of the family listened. I haven't looked back on it recently, but I don't think it was very complicated or hard to understand; on the contrary, I think us kids usually understood what my father was reading. We even had an interesting "hashgacha ...


0

There is an elderly Jew with lots of knowledge of tradition that I knew a while back. He came to the Shalom Zachor of my oldest son. There he said the reason for the custom is that Chickpeas were traditionally made with lots of pepper and were very sharp. Beer was served to cut the sharpness of the chickpeas. I can attest to the sharpness aspect as I have ...


0

From here source #17 http://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Electricity_on_Shabbat#Setting_Timers_before_Shabbat Sheivet HaLevi 9:69 permits walking in an area where there is a motion sensor that will activate a light, such as those attached to the outside of buildings. He explains that davar she’eino mitkaven refers only to when one does an action that may ...


1

No, he does not have to make the Kidush before the Coffee. There is the rule of Kidush Bimkom Se'uda (to make the kidush in the place where you are about to dine), which originates from the words of the Rashbam on Bavli, Psachim, page 100 ("רב הונא ורבה ואביי כולהו סברי בסמוך אין קידוש אלא במקום סעודה וכן פסק במגילת סתרים"), and therefore it is not even a ...


1

According to Igros Moshe in Orach Chaim chelek 2 siman 26 one would not make kiddush to drink coffee. He says he only rules with that Biur Halacha when one needs to eat real bread or pas habaa bikisnin which is real bread if someone is kovea seuda on it. As opposed to cooked grains which are never considered bread, when eating these for refuah, one would ...


5

In Rabbi Eider's Halachos of Shabbos page 322 footnote 657, he quotes a list of Rabbis who say this is assur. In order of his quoting them: Rav Y. Henkin in Euros Yisroel page 122. Tzitz Eliezer chelek 2 siman 6 & 7. Chelek three siman 18. Chelek 7 siman 16. Minchas Yitzchok chelek 4 siman 26. He mentions as well that according to some opinions ...


3

My personal favorite to share at the Shabbos table is The Shabbos Kitchen by Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen and his entire Shabbos Halacha series. Each chapter generally begins with a overview of the principles involved followed by a sampling of practical applications. Each part is followed by a summary. I have used it at the Shabbos table and my family ...


2

Halichos of Shabbos from Rabbi Shimon D. Eider is a good choice. It has the added benefit of including many word of mouth halachos heard directly from HaRav Moshe Feinstein.


5

Rabbi Ribiat's "39 Melochos" that you mention is lucid, comprehensive, and well-sourced, yet is also broken down into very digestible bites, which is why it has become so popular in the English-speaking world. (We've often used it as a basis for table discussions.) He begins sections with more general basic background pieces before he gets into more detailed ...


2

Yes, the Issur involves any "Behema", including horses. See the Shulchan Aruch siman 246, a horse is explicitly mentioned in the Mishna Berura there, 33-34. The "Cattle" translation is a good example why you should try your best to avoid translations if possible...


2

Essentially the simplest answer is that, at the time of the Manna, they were told then "Today is Friday, gather double and save over because tomorrow is Shabbat and you won't find". (Beshalach). So with the Manna cycle it became "known" which day actually was Shabbat and once that happened the Jews have kept a record of it ever since and therefore in the ...


1

At the very least, from the parsha of מן in parshas Bishalach chapter 16 the days of Friday and Shabbos were clear. This was pre- Har Sinai.


0

There is a medrash that Moshe Rabbeinu, while still a prince in Egypt convinced Par'o that he could get more work out of Bnai Yisrael by giving them a day off. When he was put in charge, he made that day off the same as the already established Shabbas. Another point is that the commandment uses the hai hayediah (definitive "the") this implies that the ...


0

According to the Sefer Hakuzri people all over the world have the same seven day week. This would show that it began somewhere out of the Torah. There might be a pocket of people that made themselves another system but that almost proves the rule, that they purposely tried to change. The people of China and India were not influenced by the Torah to change ...


4

There is a requirement to eat bread for first two meals of Shabbos, as per the Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim Siman 274:4. However, the Mishna Berura Siman 291:1 Sif Katan 3 notes that Shabbos meals were given for oneg meaning pleasure, not for tzar meaning pain or unpleasantness. The sefer Shemiras Shabbos K'Hilchasa therefore rules in chapter 54 paragraph 35 ...


0

Generally speaking, you cannot specifically ask a non-Jew to do melacha for you on Shabbat even prior to Shabbat (Aruch HaShulchan 243:4). However, in this case there are mitigating circumstances that could make it permitted. And a couple of them are: When sending mail, you are instructing the post office manager, who instructs an employee to deliver the ...


3

The big question is borer and it is a machloket (debate) whether it applies to large objects. The Aruch HaShulchan Siman 319:8-9 holds that sorting large objects like clothes and silverware is not an issue of borer and completely permitted. The Shmirat Shabbat kHilchata disagrees and prohibits sorting large objects. (for example see Chapter 3 Borer-89) ...


2

The tags are probably not muktze machmat chesron kis. In order for something to attain that status of muktze, it usually must be quite valuable (ex. a brit milah knife, etc.) so that the only conceivable thing you could do with the object is either prohibited or just not use it at all. (Shulchan Aruch Siman 308.1) It appears to me however that it does fit ...


3

The short answer is no. Lchatchila you cannot have a nonJew do a melacha for you on Shabbat. And if you see a nonJew doing melacha for you, you should persuade/rebuke him not to do so in the future. (See Aruch HaShulchan Siman 253: 36) Some possible exceptions: Bishul bchama, cooking strictly using the sun is permitted on Shabbat. There is however a ...


0

I remember hearing that the reason may be the Chazal that tells us that two angels accompany every Yid from shul on friday night and the double "gut shabbos" is meant to address both of these malachim (do not have a definite source)


3

The custom to respond to a greeting/wish-for-peace by giving some additional blessing - and expressing that additional blessing by 'doubling' the received wish - seems to go back at least to the times of the gemara: see Gitin 62a, where it talks about greeting gentiles working the land during shmita, and refers to "doubling" the "Shalom." (Apparently the ...


1

This may not be the answer you want to hear but here goes. The only time ownership plays a role in the laws of muktzah is when we are discussing something which is muktzah due to being unusable. And even that has specific details. See the very end of hilchos muktzah in Orach Chaim 308 52 with Mishna Berurah. A useless item to a rich man is muktzah to him. ...



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