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1

The Gemara in Berachot says that Shabbat is one the names of Hashem. The Halacha also says that mentioning Hashem's Name in the bathroom [let alone speaking] is forbidden. Therefore, the Poskim bring down that mentioning Shabbat is forbidden.


6

The Chassam Soffer in Toras Moshe mahadurei kama in his drush for 7th of Adar d.h. kasuv addresses this. In short he says that just like every generation that the Beis Hamikdosh is not rebuilt is as if it was destroyed, so too every year on the tenth of Teives which was the beginning of the destruction, we are judged and a gezeira is put forth if the Beis ...


0

Answer to the second part: The Yeshiva World says: Talking Many people have a habit of talking while in the bathroom (even when one is not actually “using the toilet”). However, this practice is forbidden. Many poskim maintain that talking in the bathroom is not allowed if it is not a great tzorech when one is not using the toilet.[10] Some ...


2

On page 227 of the link which was posted by Avrohom Yitzchok he gives a difference which seemed quite compelling to me. When it comes the beam, there is no idea to see the beam for its own sake, it is rather to be able to recognize that the boundary is there, so you see the sign, and that is good enough. Whereas with the Chanuka candle and a Sukka, you have ...


2

In short: I want to gift a [whatever] to my friend Yonah (gender-neutral) on Shabbat. So before Shabbat, I go to my friend Simcha (gender-neutral, but over the age of bar/bat mitzva) and say: "I would like you to acquire this on behalf of Yonah." I hand it to Simcha, and Simcha picks up the [whatever] a few inches in demonstration of acknowledgment. The ...


3

See here for a general overview and various opinions on giving gifts on Shabbos. .. the Beis Yosef (OC 527) allows one to give a gift on Shabbos if it will be used for Mitzva purposes. This is the basis for allowing one to give their Lulav and Esrog to another as a gift on the first day (or 2) of Sukkos. The Magen Avraham (OC 306:15) question the ...


0

A table not covered with a tablecloth, and likewise a kitchen counter: if one of these got dirty, then the rule is: If the dirty area is dry, one may clean it with a dry rag of any material, and may even rub with the dry rag in order to remove the food leftovers that are stuck. But it's impermissible to clean it with a damp or wet rag, as such use ...


1

Source article: http://www.torahmusings.com/2014/12/guests-travelers-chanukah/ First of all, as the question assumes, there is an obligation for a traveler to light candles (Shabbos daf 21, Shulḥan Arukh 677:1). If the traveler's wife will be lighting for him in his house, the custom of the Sefardim (see Beis Yosef there) would be for the guest not to light ...


0

I was scheduled to eat at another family's house this year on Friday night of Chanuka, and I asked my rabbi what to do. He said that I should either light my menora at home or light and sleep at the other family's house.


5

I personally heard Rabbi Belsky sometime around 2004-2006(?) giving the following advice. The situation was that people were having a lot of guests for Shabbos and wanted to leave beverages in their car to keep cold. He said it was fine as long as this procedure is followed correctly. Of course the light must be disabled. The door itself is part of a kli ...


2

As for home remedies, you'd have to ask someone else. (Milk?) The critical point in halacha here is as follows: medication is allowed for someone "very sick" or "in a lot of pain" or "sick all over." Someone who "eh feels a little something funny" can't use anything medicinal, only things that healthy people normally consume. Scimonster pointed out that if ...


5

Shmirat Shabbat C'hilchatah, 33:16: מי שמצטער הרבה מחוסר שינה, מותר לו לקחת כדורי-שינה. Someone who suffers greatly from lack of sleep (insomnia) is allowed to take sleeping pills. (my translation) If even sleeping pills are allowed, some tea should certainly be OK.


-1

When I've needed to do this (which isn't often thankfully), it's usually a short distance inside the house, and for whatever reason it's also usually in the kitchen. Therefore I use what's available and carry the object with another object - I use salad tongs.


0

I've seen and done many shinuyim in my time. The easiest that I could think of, if you're the black hat type (or heavily involved in Winterbash ;-), is to put something under your hat. There's usually plenty of room in there. Another shinuy could be to put something in your sock, though if you'll be walking for a while, expect blisters on your ankle ...


3

I found the Gemorrah to be Shabbos 118B not 118A, Rashi in Bamidbar, at the end of Shelach says that the Jews had already kept one Shabbos, before the story of the Mekoshesh Etzim - wood gatherer, so it makes sense to say that this would be meaning - should the Jews keep one more Shabbos (a total of two), the Geula would come.


7

Even in a real public domain one can carry things within 4 Amot. (ShA OC 349) So he was allowed to pick it up and put it on. Then he's wearing it and can continue walking. (Though he might not have been allowed to wear it without enough clips to begin with...)


6

Bottom line on top: you should violate Shabbos for all cases of suicide on Shabbos. (R Moshe Feinstein, Tzitz Eliezer); with one (very rare, practically non-existent) exception according to R Shlomo Zalman Auerbach. Rabbi Moshe Halevi Spero explores this issue in his article in The Journal of Halacha and Contemporary Society, vol. 3 (Spring 1982). I ...


2

According to DinOnline.org one may make sushi on Shabbos, however the rice should not be very hot.


3

The reason for the custom is that according to those who understand these matters, Monday and Thursday are Yemei Rotzon, days of added Divine "favor", and Shabbos afternoon is also known in Kabbala as a time of Raava d'Raavin, a time of extreme Divine favor. So it is seen as especially auspicious to have one's first aliya during that more Jewishly ...


1

To give a real example of the situation that Adam Moshe raised as a theoretical possibility: I was not raised Orthodox (what would now be considered Traditional Halachic Conservative) but I encountered this situation once in my childhood - my sister was injured on Shabbat and my mother, without hesitation, bundled us all into the car and drove her to the ...


8

According to Shmuely Wollenberger in The Coffee Room at The Yeshiva World Rabbi Schachter held it was forbidden. Rav Schachter and his wife used to go for walks on Shabbos. They would cross part of the George Washington bridge then stop and turn around because the bridge is farther than the T'chum. From Gershon Dubin at ...


4

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein actually addressed a similar concern, Maris Ayin with regards to your lights on timers -- an onlooker will see your dining room suddenly -- click! -- lit up. He allowed it; so I'd assume the same should apply here.


5

The atheist is still a Jew; his (non-)belief does not exempt him from the obligation not to violate Shabbat. This answer elsewhere by DoubleAA discusses benefitting from melacha done by a Jew. It stands to reason that if you can't benefit from the work anyway, there's no benefit to you in asking him to be your "Shabbat goy", so let's look first at the case ...


4

From http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/weekly_torah.php?id=393 One may use a water cooler or water fountain (72) (even when it is plugged in) on Shabbos if he is lenient in regard to opening a refrigerator on Shabbos (even if the motor is off).(73) The same would apply to changing the water bottle on top of a water cooler on Shabbos. (74) (72) Horav ...


0

This article seems to provide a detailed analysis of this question. Excerpt from beginning. (Read the rest of the article as well as cited sources, there): SUMMARY – on Shabbat one may wash up to half their body in permitted hot water. The types of hot water that is considered permitted to (partially) wash with on Shabbat are, water heated before ...


0

See OUTLINES OF HALACHOS FROM THE DAF prepared by Rabbi Pesach Feldman of Kollel Iyun Hadaf.


10

Rabbi Ribiat discusses this in The 39 Melochos (in the corrected edition, Misrad Hasefer 2004), Section 3/C/b-3. He says that most poskim (notably, ערוך השלחן שכ"ו י"א) rule that one is allowed to use liquid soap on Shabbos, because Memarayach (a toldah of Memachaik) does not apply to liquids. However, some poskim (notably, אגרות משה שו"ח ח"א קי"ג) rule ...


4

See: http://www.cckollel.org/parsha_encounters/5770/noach_70.pdf This source is an interesting article on liquid soap and soap bar.


2

( Bold part of answer is the real answer; the rest is just background ) Rabbi Ribiat writes in The 39 Melochos (in the corrected edition, Misrad Hasefer 2004) [Section 2, Chapter II, section G; page 214]: If a Melocho is performed in what is Halachically recognized as an irregular mode, it may be considered a "Shinui" (שינוי). ....a Melocho ...


3

Rabbi EY Waldenburg (Tzitz Eliezer) discusses this question; his ruling is brought down by Rabbi Dr. Abraham Steinberg in Hilchos Rofi'm uRefuah (Mossad Harav Kook, 1978), 2:1:17: כאשר יסוד ההיתר לחילול שבת הוא משום הסברא של "חלל עליו שבת אחת כדי שישמור שבתות הרבה" -- כגון בעובר, יש מקום לומר שאז מותר חילול שבת רק במקרים של ודאי פקוח נפש ולא בספק ...


-1

First the problem begin with the hosting company, if there are jews like in israel server farm, they work in shabbos and u arnt allowed to injoy from that, plus u r assistng them with there avera, "mesiia ledvar avera", after that told u can use not jewish farm server but u must acknowledge that the work wont be specific for u, couse goy doesnt allow to do ...



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