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10

The story is told about the Steipler zt"l who at his first shidduch meeting with the sister of the Chazon Ish promptly fell asleep. When the Chazon Ish asked him to explain his behaviour, the Steipler answered that he had stayed awake the night before learning, figuring that could he sleep on the long train ride to the meeting the next day. But when he ...


8

Welhelm Gesenius suggests in his Hebrew Dictionary of Tanach that the word derives from the Coptic saht (woven) + nuje (false). He also notes the Septuagent's rendering κίβδηλος (spurious). A pdf of the dictionary page can be found here. Ibn Ezra already notes in his commentary to Vayikra 19:19 that the word is a dis legomenon and as such we can't know for ...


8

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 298:1 אין אסור משום כלאים, אלא צמר רחלים ואילים עם פשתן. אבל צמר גמלים וצמר ארנבים ונוצה של עזים וכל שאר מינים, מותרים בפשתן. The only thing forbidden because of Shaatnez is sheep and ram wool with linen; camel wool, rabbit wool, goat hair, or other similar items are permitted with linen. The rule that only sheep and ram ...


7

Per Shatnez Testers of America and Chabad.org no. When we speak of wool, we are only referring to wool obtained from sheep or lambs. Other materials, such as camel's hair, mohair, angora, cashmere or alpaca wool, present no shatnez problems.


7

This issue is a dispute of Rishonim. The Rash to Kilayim 9:1 says the wool and linen must touch to be prohibited. The Rambam (Kilayim 10:3) holds even if they are not touching, as long as they are in the same garment it is shatnez. תפר בגד של צמר בשל פשתן, אפילו תפרן במשי, או שתפר בגד צמר בחוטי פשתים, או בגד פשתים בחוטי צמר, או קשר חוט צמר בחוטי פשתן ...


6

First and foremost it is a Chok without a reason. However, some see a symbolic reminder in the mitzva of Shaatnez to the first, terrible clash between brothers, that resulted in Kayin killing Hevel. Kayin's offering to G-d was from the produce of the ground and Hevel's was from his flock. Keeping wool and linen separate in garments reminds us of this ...


5

Per Gemara Yevamos 5: it is Roshei taivos for שוע טווי ונוז. The Even Ezra translates Shatnez as mixture. http://www.ou.org/torah/article/kilayim_9_7-8 וראיתי לאחד מרבותינו שפירש שוע טווי הצמר לבד והפשתים לבד, ונוז כלומר ואח"כ נוז דהיינו שניהם ארוגים יחד


5

The Mishna in Kelayim Perek 9 says that those that sell Shatnez are allowed to try it on in order to model it to the Purchaser. According to this Shita you would be allowed to try it on prior to purchasing. However we do not Pasken like that. The Heter to try it on is based on Rov, since most clothing is not Shatnez, and as it is not yours you can not check ...


5

In short: The Torah says in Devarim 22: 11 - 12: You shall not wear a mixture of wool and linen together. You shall make yourself twisted threads, on the four corners of your garment with which you cover yourself. We learn from this juxtaposition of pesukim that one can even make Tzitzis in a case of Shaatnez. (from here)


4

Originally it was real flax. Then the major esrog growers in Israel found a way to save some money and switched to some other natural material. I don't remember exactly what it was Jute? or Hemp? I also don't remember exactly when the change took place, but I am sure it was sometime after 1980. Also I don't think that they went to the present packaging ...


4

According to Shabbos 54a, this would not meet the requirements for shaatnez. A double-fastening is needed to make flax and wool into a Kli. One stitch holding a piece piece of wool to a piece of linen is not liable, two stitches are needed. Also, if you wrap a cord of wool and a cord of flax around your hand, you're are liable (eg. leading two camels, one ...


4

http://shatnez.n3.net/ Here are a few: Carpets/Rugs: May require testing. Wool carpets (wall-to-wall) and area rugs may be backed or reinforced with linen. Non-woolen rugs and carpets are not a problem. Services are available at most shatnez laboratories for those who wish to have their carpets tested. Linen and Linen-look fabrics: Require testing. ...


4

If the item is known to be shatnez, to try it on for size would be prohibited according to the Beis Yosef, and permitted according to the Rama. Thus, ashkenazim and sephardim should follow their respective authorities. See here: http://home.comcast.net/~shatnez/halacha1.html


4

In part III Rambam's Guide of the perplexed, he categorizes the mitzvot into fourteen classes by their causes, intents and usefulness. He even classifies laws that he acknowledges are choks, which, like all commandments, have a cause, intent, or usefulness, but it has been concealed and is therefore unknown to us. In chapter XLIX, he says that "most of the ...


4

The 100% in 100% polyester and 100% silk suits refers to the visible part of the suit. Underneath that is an entire world of stuffing, reinforcement and other junk. The easiest place to see some of these is under the lapel; under the felt is something stiff, and it's not silk/polyester. These hidden parts are made from whatever material the factory can buy ...


3

Although the other answers mentioned that cashmere may be mixed with linen as it comes from the Kashmir goat, practically this is not true. That is because cashmere by itself is a very expensive material. Each goat can only produce about 4 ounces of fibers a year and it is estimated that fleece from 4 to 6 animals would be needed for a sweater. Because of ...


3

Aish says Shatnez is forbidden when it is worn as a normal garment -- i.e. to protect from the cold, rain and heat. It is therefore permitted to try on a new outfit for size, even though it may contain shatnez Wikipedia says, “Shatnez is prohibited only when worn as an ordinary garment, for the protection or benefit of the body,[12] or for ...


3

Read the section in Shimushah Shel Torah dealing with it. (It's illustrated.)


3

I think generally speaking, if you'd reasonably believe it could contain wool or linen. I heard something about baseball mitts being a problem? Anyone hear of this? From what I've heard, a garment that's entirely cotton and/or synthetic is incredibly unlikely to contain both wool and linen (but men's suits could still have lining or padding or the like ...


3

Rav Aaron Abadi writes: "Don't listen to the rumors. There is no need to check for Shaatnez on any article of clothing unless you're sure there's shaatnez in there. For all those who need to know.... Shaatnez according to some Rishonim requires "Shua, Tavi, and Nuz all together." We don't have that today. So according to those Rishonim, today's Shaatnez is ...


2

If the fibers are simply on top of the wool and not embedded, there is (are?) no kilayim; furthermore I'm not sure if a stray random fiber (as opposed to a thread) is considered significant. It seemed to me that SA YD 299:1 may be relevant, but I couldn't understand all of it.


2

I think the accepted opinion holds that by an issur one should be choshesh for a "miut ha'motzoi", which I think R.H. Schachter defines as around 10%. So if you think the suit has a greater than 10% chance of being shatnez, you should get it checked. If so, I think only certain higher-end wool suits would be an issue. Some might hold one should check it even ...


2

While its clearly a chok, there are reasons given for it. Some suggest that it is 'unnatural' to combine something from an animal with something from a plant into one garment. This would fit with the other prohibitions mentioned in the passuk. Also, a lot of Judaism is about maintaining proper separations. R' Hirsch expands on the symbolism of the animal ...


2

See R' Avrohom Miller's shatnez halacha series in which he says that according to most poskim, walking barefoot on a shatnez carpet is prohibited, or even not barefoot if the carpet is plush enough to cover part of your feet.


2

According to AFTA Shatnez Testing Center in Chicago, one cannot rely on Hazakah or Rov or anything like that. They say that ALL men's, women's, and children's clothing that list wool or linen should be tested. ALL jackets and coats should be tested even if wool or linen is not listed If contents list "Other Fiber" or "O.F." beware and have the garment ...


2

Since the label is sewn into the inside of the suit, how would anyone know that it is not there? I normally staple it into the inside of the suit so that I will remember that I have had it checked. If it is not there, you might get it confused with a different suit that you need to check. Marit Ayin is a matter of how something appears to people walking by ...


2

No, my mother works in the suit industry, and she asked our community rabbi this exact question. He said that as long as it is in the same garment it is impermissible; it does not need to be sewn together. I do not know the sources he used to answer her.


1

I have, several times, called a shaatnez lab (the so-called "Mikdash Melech" one in Midwood, though I think it no longer has any connection with Mikdash Melech), asked about a certain article of clothing whether it has shaatnez, and was told that there is a chazaka (reliable status quo, in this case based on the manufacturer and place of origin) that it does ...


1

Per Yalkut Yosef when you purchase clothing from a non Jew you have to inspect them for Shaatnez even if the non Jew insists there is no linen threads. However if linen threads are significantly more expensive then one may rely on that fact. If one supplied the material to a non Jew we are not afraid that he will switch the goods, since it can be checked. ...



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