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Yalkut Yosef. It is an authoritative, contemporary work of Halakha, providing a detailed explanation of the Shulchan Aruch.


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There are various Sephardic customs for how to arrange the arba minim. The Ben Ish Chai's halakhic works and responsa never explicitly refer to what he did. Nevertheless, the most common custom today among Sephardim is follow the Arizal, who was a primary influence on the Ben Ish Chai and many Sephardic authorities generally. The custom of the Arizal is ...


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Since they are not annotated in any way, it's impossible to know of any given sefer tora what it's model was. Further, even if we knew that a given sefer was exactly copied from the Keter (Aleppo Codex), that would not help us recreate the vowels or accents. However, by taking the majority reading of specific selected Masoretic manuscripts, Rabbi Breuer ...


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The Spanish-Portuguese custom is uncommon, in that sifre tora are not placed in cases, but covered with jackets. The second sefer is held by someone who sits on the teba. However, unlike Ashkinazim, there is a qaddish when the reading is finished in each, i.e., the second sefer is not brought to the reading desk until after qaddish is said, then the first ...


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The full expression (at least in the Spanish-Portuguese custom) is "hazaq ubarukh tihye" (yes, that "b" is beth without daghesh, as is standard in Spanish-Portuguese Hebrew pronunciation). The challenge is that we do not know whether it is "be strong (verb) and be blessed" or "be strong (adjective) and blessed". In the former case, the heth would have the ...


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I have no evidence to support this theory, but I believe that it is in order to ensure that the prayers are articulated carefully and correctly. Muttering ("watermelon, watermelon, watermelon,...") is discouraged.


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Refer to Keter Shem Tob, by Rabbi Shem-Tob Gaguine (1884-1953). The Spanish-Portuguese are not "original" Sephardim. Spanish-Portuguese Jews are descended from those who lived in Spain/Portugal until the 1600's, when they were able to travel abroad (to Amsterdam, for example) and were able to live as Jews. Since they had little Jewish knowledge they ...


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The custom of the Spanish and Portuguese synagogue in New York is that a person not reading the haftara may be called up for the maftir portion "bimqom maftir" and says the blessings on the Torah as usual.



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