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14

The Rema 139:11 says To say Chazak from the passuk in Yehoshua that says Chazak vametz .The passuk before it says that Torah should not leave your mouth and it will be a blessing for you. So there are those who say Chazak u'baruch and others answer Chazak vametz. The Kaf Hachaim 139:56 brings down the minhag to say Chazak U'baruch from this Rema.


13

There is no one simple answer for this; however, if you had to pick the one biggest name among Sefardi rabbis living today, that would be Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, shlit'a. While not all Sefardim follow him all the time, his word is definitely given a great deal of weight. Is that who you had in mind? The Shulchan Aruch (written about 450 years ago) is ...


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


10

What I find interesting about the Rosh is that he remained an Ashkenazi-centrist, even in his host country. He started a Yeshibha based on the Ashkenaz model, married his sons, exclusively, to members of his own extended family (although he did marry his daughters to Sephardim, probably students at his Yeshibha..). Another interesting thing to point out is ...


10

The only source I have yet to find acknowledging this switch in clothing from a Sephardic perspective is in the English edition to the Yalkut Yosef Hilkhot Shabbat. Under Siman 242, Halakhah 5, regarding the mitzvah to change from weekday clothes into more elegant garments, the editor (R. Yisrael Bitan) added a special footnote: The Kabbalists ruled that ...


9

There are lots of differences. Among the more obvious ones: Dialect - the Bavli is written in Eastern Aramaic, the Yerushalmi in Western Aramaic. There are differences in vocabulary (such as B. חזי = Y. חמי, both meaning "see" - we in fact use both of these in the second Kol Chamira on Erev Pesach morning), in word forms (the Bavli tends to drop final ן in ...


9

The Jews of Bagdad and Morocco stayed away from rice because they were afraid that it was mixed with wheat. See Ben Ish Chai Tzav 41 , Rav Pe’alim 3:30


9

Sephardi Jews is a general term referring to the descendants of Spanish and Portuguese Jews who lived in the Iberian Peninsula before their expulsion in 1492 by the Alhambra Decree. It can also refer to those who use a Sephardic style of liturgy, or would otherwise define themselves in terms of Jewish customs and traditions from the Iberian Peninsula. ...


8

Rav Yosef Karo, in Beit Yosef (131), cites the Zohar, which describes the tikkun (improvement, repair) of falling upon one's face while reciting Tehillim 25: And this tikkun should be recited with great sincerity; then God shows compassion to His people and forgives their sins. Happy is the person who can entice and ...


8

Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that all ethnic pronunciations of Hebrew are equally acceptable, even for chalitza which requires the reading of specific Hebrew verses. I'd assume the same would apply here, according to him.


8

I think the main issue is not how close/far they were from one another, but who was in charge. By and large, Sepharadim were under Muslim rule, which allowed them freedoms that were not given to Ashkenazim by their Christian overlords. It was more of an Iron Curtain barrier than a distance barrier. One might also note the consistency with which Sepharadim ...


8

While it is on the bimah, turn the Torah around so that the opening is away from you and then open up the scroll. You should be looking at the back of the Torah, standing immediately next to the bimah. Put your right hand so that it is on the right vertical edge of the right side of the case (reverse instructions for lefties), about half way up. Slowly ...


8

Hazon Ovadia Purim pg. 199 מה שנוהגים להתחפש וללבוש מסיכות בפורים, אין כל איסור בדבר.‏ It is Mutar to dress up Purim. What is Asur on Purim? Cross dressing Inviting magicians Making fun of the Rabbis on Purim (All from Yalkut Yosef 695)


8

Rav Yosef Messas a"h (he served as Rav in Tilimsan Algeria, Meknes Morocco, and as Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Haifa) held that wearing costumes/disguises on Purim is absolutely forbidden as hukas hagoyim and that its origins stem from an imitation of the pre-Lent festivity of Carnavale which itself has origins in the orgiastic paganism of Bacchanalia. He ...


8

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


7

As mentioned by Shalom, Rav Ovadia would probably be called the "Sefardi rav." Other Sefardi rabbis that people also follow such as: Rav Mordechai Eliyahu (who passed away very recently 1-2 years ago); Rav BenSion Aba Shaul (passed away 1998); Rav BenSion Musafi Shelita; Rav Shelomo Amar (Sephardic Chief rabbi); Rav Eliyahu Bakshi Doron (former chief ...


7

When their community first started to take root in the US many of their men began to date gentile women. This lead naturally of course to them wanting to marry these women. However given the strong social stigma and taboo associated with intermarriage (not to mention the halachic issur) many of them preferred to encourage their romantic partners to convert ...


7

Sefer Ben Ish Hai Year 2 Bereshit Ot 29(Quoting from the English Edition published by Ahavat Shalom): One then commences the physical preparations for qiddush. It should be noted that there are profound kabbalistic kawwanoth in each of these actions, so one should not omit any of them. One should recieve the cup of wine with both hands form someone ...


7

The simple answer is because Shulhan Arukh 581:1 and the Arizal Sha'ar HaKavvanot 89d, Pri Etz Haim 128b(see also Likutei Torah 106b, Shaar Ruah HaKodesh 48a and Shaar HPesukim 41a) say so. For a more thorough answer according to halakha and Kabbalah see Divrei Shalom with perush Ner Shalom by R' Shalom Afjin(unfortunately not online). He essentially ...


7

The Kaf Hachaim (9:15) brings many sources and reasons why the Talit itself should be completely white (although he says black stripes at the bottom do not invalidate this, since we look at the majority of the Talit). A couple of the reasons he brings: Shulchan Aruch says that the Tzitzit should be the same color as the garment, since the strings are ...


7

http://www.midrash.org/halakha/roshana.html Ashkenazim have the Minhag of dipping the Hamotzi in honey on Rosh Hashana, and this is the appropriate custom according to Ashkenazi tradition. According to the BEN ISH HAI, the Hammosi must be dipped three times in sugar and three times in salt. Salt must be used because the table is likened to the ...


7

The Kaf HaChaim OC 489 sk 112 seems to permit Chadash liquid derivatives (such as whiskey) even for someone who is particular about regular Chadash grain.


7

This question ought to be, "Why can Ashkenazi Jews not eat rice on Passover?" There are 5 grains that make Ḥametz when mixed with water and allowed to rise: barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt. Any others that have been added by communal custom are just that - additions by virtue of communal custom.


7

Indeed, the Beit Yosef (OC 36) cites the Gemara you reference and claims that the ש should have a pointed base. The Peri Megadim (EA end of 32) is unsure if this is a necessary component of the letter. The Keset HaSofer (5:2:ש) implies it would be Kosher Bedieved, but one should be very careful to avoid a flat base. The Mishna Berura (Mishnat Sofrim ש) is ...


6

Like all things dealing with Sephardi minhagim, it is Kabbalistic and complicated. First the reason to have them is founded in the Zohar Helek 2, 68b, and Helek 3, 219, where it states that Hadas is a deterrent to the sitra ahra, ayyin hara and other negative spiritual forces. Going on from there, highly mystical reasons of tikkun olam are involved as the ...


6

Another point to add to Seth's: Jewish communities have gotten pretty "mixed up" over time. Ashkenazic Jewry basically descends from the Italian communities of the early Middle Ages, and some historians trace them and their traditions back to the Jews of Eretz Yisrael (as contrasted with the Sephardim, who derive their traditions from the Jews of ...


6

The -ach-final form is not just a feminine form (even in Biblical but also in later Hebrew) but also: a Biblical-Hebrew pausal masculine form. (E.g., 2 Sh'muel 7:9 has וָאֶהְיֶה עִמְּךָ whereas Sh'mos 3:12 has כִּי אֶהְיֶה עִמָּךְ.) This explanation seems unlikely to me for things like nakdishach (at the start of k'dusha). a rabbinic-Hebrew[1] masculine ...


6

Apparently, at least in the last couple of centuries, the Keter was jealously guarded and people indeed were not permitted to make copies of it. (There may well have been other copies of it from Rambam's times or the next couple of centuries after that, but if so, they either haven't survived or are unknown.) One important source that we do have - R. ...


6

Kitniyot are not specified in the Torah at all. They are chumrot — binding customs of the community. The Sefardic kitniyot custom permits rice provided it has been carefully checked grain-by-grain before Passover begins to ensure that no chametz grains are in it. (How carefully depends on the tradition; I have seen "3 times" and "7 times" specified by ...



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