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I double checked with my LOR and besides the laws of New Jersey and New York shown in the other answers, the normal behavior throughout the country is that private one time sales are not charged sales tax. That is, when you see an ad in the paper for someone selling an item, the buyer is not charged sales tax and the seller (not being a business) does not ...


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Other answerers have disputed your premise that you'd need, under the law, to worry about sales tax. I'll grant arguendo that there's a sales-tax issue but dispute another premise: that you need to charge your gentile customer the sales tax. Stores frequently have "we'll pay the tax!" sales. That is, instead of charging you $108 for a $100 item and ...


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It would seem to me that in the state on NJ this would be considered a "casual sale" and would not be subject to tax. http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/taxation/pdf/pubs/sales/anj15.pdf Under :Seasonal, Occasional, and Casual Sales Sales by persons making isolated or occasional sales of items of tangible personal property which were purchased by them ...


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Per here as long as you sell the item from your home, and don't deliver it (and several other limitations) you do not have to pay sales tax. If you happen to sell more than $600 worth, but didn't intend to, then you have to pay taxes on the rest. But that is only true after the fact, so you don't have to register. So the upshot is that since you don't ...


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The sales tax has already been applied when you bought the food from the store to begin with. Reselling it to a goy (and back) does not incur tax unless you "add value" somehow.


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I doublechecked with my LOR and he confirmed what I had thought. A katan cannot sell property. If he has a father, his father would own all the chametz and sell it. If he is, chas veshalom, an orphan, then he will have an apitropos who will sell the chametz for him. We see a basis for this in Maseches Sukkah were a person cannot give a lulav to a katan (al ...


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From various Mishnayot (see below) we see that a Ger's possessions seem to continue to belong to him after he converts. In that case, the moment your buyer converts, he owns Chametz on Pessach - Chametz from which everybody is now forbidden to derive benefit from - similar to any Chametz a Jew owns on Pessach. Result: He would not be allowed to sell it ...



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