Hot answers tagged

6

According to R. Amnon Bazak, there is no source, and it in fact goes against tradition. Although the custom to recite "Parshat ha-Man" appears in the first siman of Shulchan Aruch, there it is a practice for every day, "in order that one should believe that his food comes with divine providence." This practice was not widely accepted. Some poskim quote a ...


2

Yes. this is something that is said in the gemara in order to protect one from dogs. As an example Rav David Silverberg The Gemara in Masekhet Berakhot (56b) comments that if a person dreams about a dog, upon awakening he should immediately recite this verse from Sefer Shemot that speaks of the dogs’ silence on the night of Yetzi’at Mitzrayim. ...


2

Hakham Ovadya Yosef z"l rules explicitly in Yabia `Omer (Orah Hayyim 2:2) - citing the view of the Rashba - that the concept of a hassissah only applies to the bayith and the upper arm, not to the straps, and especially not on the wrist. The question there is regarding a wristwatch, but it would by extension apply to anything being worn on the wrist. [As ...


1

Maimonides seems to draw a distinction between recitation of verses, such as Psalms as an expression of the mitzva (to study Torah) which is permitted and recitation of verses as a form of a talisman. He writes in Hil. Avodah Zarah (11: 12): הלוחש על המכה וקורא פסוק מן התורה וכן הקורא על התינוק שלא יבעת והמניח ספר תורה או תפילין על הקטן בשביל שיישן, לא ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible