Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

That is why we say "yesterday was the fourth day" before counting. You do not want to say "today is" in any way because even in an indirect manner you are counting today. Once you have said "today is" then however you say the number, that is still a count. "Code of Jewish Law Ganzfried - Goldin, volume 3 page 52 chapter 120 number 3 (translation of Kitzur ...


6

The correct order to perform the Mitzvos would be: 1 - Krias Shema(which is most frequent) 2 - Birchas Hamazon 3 - Sefiras Haomer Many people are accustomed to recite Krias Shema after Birchas Hamazon, even though Krias Shema is the more frequent Mitzvah. The reason why many permit this is that one is not obligated to interrupt ...


6

You sure you want to open up this can of worms? :-) Here's the situation. There is no explicit mention of any such concept in the Torah, Talmud, or adressed by the Rambam, the Rosh, the Tur, or the Shulchan Aruch. The first time this really became an issue when during WWII when yeshiva students (notably those from Mir and Chachmei Lublin) relocated from ...


5

If the Rabbi of a congregation forgot to count one day and he usually makes the bracha out loud, he may continue to count with a bracha; by not continuing to count he will cause a disgrace for Torah and is a disgrace for the members of the congregation. (Shevet Ha'Levi 3:96, 4:157 note to ch 96) The heter is for a Rabbi because of his public position, not ...


3

Or letzion (3:17 3) writes that all children may have haircuts during sefirah since aveilus does not apply to children. However rav Elyashiv (hilchos chag bechag 7 fun 58) that it should be avoided unless there's a need like an upsherin According to Arizal the upsherin is delayed to lag baomer. See dirshu edition mishna beturah 493 note 18


2

Taame Haminhagim 577 answers (in my own loose translation): … because we shouldn't be so strict about it, since it's nothing but a remembrance to what was done when we had the bes hamikdash. Another [reason] is that if we count one day ahead then we'll reach number 49 on Shavuos, which we'll therefore come to treat lightly. (Avudraham.) He ...


2

Ba'al Hameor and Ravad (both at the end of Pesachim) assume that the communities counted only one day, starting from the first day of Yom Tov. Whether or not they did this with a beracha would probably depend on whether or not you make a bracha on a mitzvah done out of doubt (Rambam to Milah 3:6 says no and the Ravad there argues; Ran Shabbos 23a agrees with ...


2

The Rivevos Ephraim 1:336 and 2:155:19 talk about this. He seems to hold that for a mitzva its mutar ,however he makes a distinction for those who live in Eretz Yisroel who usually bring their son to meron on lag baomer(even some months earlier) .If he didn't do it on lab bomer then he should wait until after Tisha b'av(the tshuvua speaks about three weeks ...


2

The rule applies to hair anywhere on the body (Nit'e Gavriel, Pesach volume 3, chapter 49, paragraph 2, page 279; see that chapter for exceptions, but pubic hair is explicitly not excepted).


2

In this essay by R' Alan Haber of MMY, he makes an argument along the lines of: For those who do so, saying Hallel, and therefore rejoicing, on Yom Ha'atzma'ut is either a mitzva (e.g. according to R' Meshulem Roth) or at least a minhag. Mourning during the Omer is a minhag. The aspect of it that prohibits music generally, as opposed to weddings ...


2

The various discussions show that farther in the past, there were a number of different minhagim. It was not always the case that weddings were not held for the entire period (though that is one minhag as shown by Rabbi Kaganoff). Rabbi Kaganoff points out that no matter what minhag is being observed, it is still basically a method of counting 33 days. ...


2

For a start, the words before the ones you mention are: שֶׁבַע שַׁבָּתוֹת, תְּמִימֹת תִּהְיֶינָה Seven complete weeks are only 49 days. Secondly, we see other times in Chumash that a number means "until, but not including" that number. For example in Devarim (25:3): אַרְבָּעִים יַכֶּנּוּ, לֹא יֹסִיף We only strike him 39 lashes; all the up to - ...


2

Despite the regular principle of "Safek brachot l'hakel", when in doubt do without a bracha, the case of sefirat ha'omer may be different. This because only the Behag understands that it is problematic to count if one lost count. Because the opinion is remote, in a case of embarrassment we could rely on the other opinions and allow the Rabbi or Chazzan in ...


1

Can't bring you sources, but I've seen it happen various times over the years that the Chazzan asks somebody else to recite the Bracha in his stead. This can easily happen to a new mourner who is exempt from evening prayers and may miss a day, as he is distracted by his misfortune. (The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 196:18 says that he should count after the ...


1

Nit'e Gavriel has an entire chapter (chapter 12) devoted to this in the volume on תגלחת הילדים הולכתם לחדר וסעודת החומש. I can't paraphrase the whole thing here, but his conclusion is that "by law it's permitted to cut his hair, but the practice is to wait until lag baomer or to cut his hair the day before Pesach".


1

Yes, on the 31st or 33rd or 45th or 47th or 48th of the omer, according to various opinions cited in Nit'e Gavriel, Pesach volume 3, chapter 49, paragraphs 22–29.


1

Mishnah Berurah (489:20) quotes the Taz who says that since the mitzvah is to count "today" any response which doesn't include that word is okay. For example, if someone asks what night it is, and you say, "the fifth night of the Omer," you may still count with the blessing. Presumably, the same would apply here, since you're not mentioning "today."


1

As brought here, the two opinions are the Mechaber and the Ramo. The Mechaber holds that the proper time to morn the students of Rabbi Akiva is when it happened, whereas the Ramo holds that it should be on the days that Tachnurn is not said. The Arizal holds that the issue on Sefira is that they are days of judgement, which is why the students died then, so ...


1

The Eitz Yosef in the new Moznayim print of Medrash Rabba in Bereishis 61 does say that they died `in one period between Pesach and Atzeres in milchamas beitar'. One can wonder if these last words were edited out of the old print or simply lost, being that it was at the bottom of the page in the old standard print. Also questionable is how to reconcile ...


1

(1). It's not that recent. The באר היטב in סימן תצג - דינים הנוהגים בימי העמר says: רק לעשות שמחות יתירות בריקודין ומחולות נהגו איסור. מ''א וח''י ע''ש So a source would be the Magen Avraham who died in 1682. As you see, the issue is dancing, so any music that is not conducive to dancing should - in theory - be permissible. Since cappella is not ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible