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8

You sure you want to open up this can of worms? :-) Here's the situation. There is no explicit mention of any such concept in the Torah, Talmud, or adressed by the Rambam, the Rosh, the Tur, or the Shulchan Aruch. The first time this really became an issue when during WWII when yeshiva students (notably those from Mir and Chachmei Lublin) relocated from ...


7

Hebrewbooks.org has a book with that title by R Shlomo Zalman Mirkash containing the ruling you reference about women and counting the Omer (available here).


7

R' C Cohen writes in Dose of Halacha .. There is another machlokes as to whether women are obligated at all. Ramban (Kiddushin 34a) holds that women are obligated, while Rambam (Temidin Umusafin 7:24; Sefer Hamitzvot 161) and the Magen Avraham (OC 489:1) hold that as it is a time-bound mitzva, women are exempt. The Mishna Berura (489:3) quotes the ...


6

The correct order to perform the Mitzvos would be: 1 - Krias Shema(which is most frequent) 2 - Birchas Hamazon 3 - Sefiras Haomer Many people are accustomed to recite Krias Shema after Birchas Hamazon, even though Krias Shema is the more frequent Mitzvah. The reason why many permit this is that one is not obligated to interrupt ...


5

If the Rabbi of a congregation forgot to count one day and he usually makes the bracha out loud, he may continue to count with a bracha; by not continuing to count he will cause a disgrace for Torah and is a disgrace for the members of the congregation. (Shevet Ha'Levi 3:96, 4:157 note to ch 96) The heter is for a Rabbi because of his public position, not ...


3

For a start, the words before the ones you mention are: שֶׁבַע שַׁבָּתוֹת, תְּמִימֹת תִּהְיֶינָה Seven complete weeks are only 49 days. Secondly, we see other times in Chumash that a number means "until, but not including" that number. For example in Devarim (25:3): אַרְבָּעִים יַכֶּנּוּ, לֹא יֹסִיף We only strike him 39 lashes; all the up to - ...


3

The allowance you reffer to is mentioned as a hetter concerning the acceptance not to sing as a zecher lichurban. Ever. There are specific instances where it applies and where it does not. See Shulchan Aruch o'ch 560 siff 3 and mishna berurah 13. Seemingly working in an office would be more comparable to a sheppard singing, or a woman doing her housework, ...


3

Chanuka is inherently connected to Sukkot where the Musaf offering includes a "countdown" of bulls. Sefirat HaOmer, on the other hand, is a biblical command to count 50 days from the offering of the Korban Omer which only makes sense incrementally since the actual date of the latter korban of the shtei halechem is dependent on that of the former of the omer. ...


3

In this essay by R' Alan Haber of MMY, he makes an argument along the lines of: For those who do so, saying Hallel, and therefore rejoicing, on Yom Ha'atzma'ut is either a mitzva (e.g. according to R' Meshulem Roth) or at least a minhag. Mourning during the Omer is a minhag. The aspect of it that prohibits music generally, as opposed to weddings ...


3

Or letzion (3:17 3) writes that all children may have haircuts during sefirah since aveilus does not apply to children. However rav Elyashiv (hilchos chag bechag 7 fun 58) that it should be avoided unless there's a need like an upsherin According to Arizal the upsherin is delayed to lag baomer. See dirshu edition mishna beturah 493 note 18


2

The Rivevos Ephraim 1:336 and 2:155:19 talk about this. He seems to hold that for a mitzva its mutar ,however he makes a distinction for those who live in Eretz Yisroel who usually bring their son to meron on lag baomer(even some months earlier) .If he didn't do it on lab bomer then he should wait until after Tisha b'av(the tshuvua speaks about three weeks ...


2

chacham ben tzion aba shaul in chelek alef-36 and chelek 3-16-5 understand the behag differently. he says even the behag agrees that its 49 seperate mitzvot . just that if you miss a day, youre lacking the continuous flow and therefore youre out. rav soloveichik is quoted also as understanding such. acc. to this , one can begin even if they know they will ...


2

Despite the regular principle of "Safek brachot l'hakel", when in doubt do without a bracha, the case of sefirat ha'omer may be different. This because only the Behag understands that it is problematic to count if one lost count. Because the opinion is remote, in a case of embarrassment we could rely on the other opinions and allow the Rabbi or Chazzan in ...


2

The various discussions show that farther in the past, there were a number of different minhagim. It was not always the case that weddings were not held for the entire period (though that is one minhag as shown by Rabbi Kaganoff). Rabbi Kaganoff points out that no matter what minhag is being observed, it is still basically a method of counting 33 days. ...


2

R' Eliezer Melamed discusses this in the Zmanim volume of פניני הלכה. He writes that the generally accepted approach to all of the minhagim of avielut of the omer is to be lenient with those things which would actually reduce the simcha of the day. For example, forbidding music and dancing would reduce the simcha so those are muttar but not allowing ...


1

I believe Rav Nachum Rabinovitch, shlit"a, is meikil. (I believe Rav Yoshe Ber Soloveichik,z"l, was meikil regarding listening to music in general during sefira.) Similarly, Rav Belsky is lenient with regard to continuing music lessons during sefira: Refer to opinions of Harav Elyashiv Shlita and Harav Korelitz Shlita quoted in Piskei Shmuos page 53, see ...


1

I asked Rav Chizkiyahu Nevenzahl shlit"a current Chief Rabbi of the old city in Jerusalem this very question. He answered that it is permitted to listen to classical music in the background to facilitate the work your area doing. He also made a point of mentioning that listening to Accapela is forbidden and is considered worse than classical music despite it ...


1

עד ממחרת השבת השביעת תספרו חמשים יום Ralbag (ad loc.) and Tosafos (Menachos 65 amud 2 s.v. "Kasuv", first explanation) explain this as: until the day after the seventh week you should count — which is day fifty. Thus, you count 49.


1

Can't bring you sources, but I've seen it happen various times over the years that the Chazzan asks somebody else to recite the Bracha in his stead. This can easily happen to a new mourner who is exempt from evening prayers and may miss a day, as he is distracted by his misfortune. (The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 196:18 says that he should count after the ...


1

Nit'e Gavriel has an entire chapter (chapter 12) devoted to this in the volume on תגלחת הילדים הולכתם לחדר וסעודת החומש. I can't paraphrase the whole thing here, but his conclusion is that "by law it's permitted to cut his hair, but the practice is to wait until lag baomer or to cut his hair the day before Pesach".


1

Mishnah Berurah (489:20) quotes the Taz who says that since the mitzvah is to count "today" any response which doesn't include that word is okay. For example, if someone asks what night it is, and you say, "the fifth night of the Omer," you may still count with the blessing. Presumably, the same would apply here, since you're not mentioning "today."


1

The Eitz Yosef in the new Moznayim print of Medrash Rabba in Bereishis 61 does say that they died `in one period between Pesach and Atzeres in milchamas beitar'. He makes a similar statement in Koheles Rabba 11, saying they died in Bar Kuzivas war. These lines were previously censored out. It is questionable though, how to reconcile this historically in ...


1

(1). It's not that recent. The באר היטב in סימן תצג - דינים הנוהגים בימי העמר says: רק לעשות שמחות יתירות בריקודין ומחולות נהגו איסור. מ''א וח''י ע''ש So a source would be the Magen Avraham who died in 1682. As you see, the issue is dancing, so any music that is not conducive to dancing should - in theory - be permissible. Since cappella is not ...



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