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15

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim, 493:2, Rema: ואין להסתפר עד ל"ג בעצמו ולא מבערב. מיהו אם חל ביום ראשון, נוהגין להסתפר ביום ששי לכבוד שבת And it is not permitted to get a haircut [or shave] until the day of the Lag b'Omer itself. However, if it [Lag b'Omer] falls on Sunday, we have a custom to get haircuts [and shave] on Friday, in honor ...


11

One source that discusses this is Minchas Chinuch (mitzvah 306). He seems to end up saying that the boy can indeed continue counting with a berachah, since his earlier Rabbinic obligation (because of chinuch, education in the performance of mitzvos) counts towards his new Biblical one. A related issue is the fact that according to many opinions, the mitzvah ...


11

Otzar Ta'amei Haminhagim (cf.) explains that it is a remnant of a time when the spoken language was Aramaic. Since the primary purpose of s'fira is the keeping track of days it is preferable to count in a language that enables the counter to keep track - i.e. a language the counter understands.


11

That's a very interesting suggestion, and I'm surprised I've never put two and two together here. After some searching, I've found that a similar suggestion was made by Shlomo Yehuda Rapoport (Shir) in the journal Kerem Chemed (vol. 7, p. 183). He suggests that the Romans chased and killed the students of R' Akiva on the suspicion that they were involved in ...


8

Sepharadim (following the psak of Rav Ovadia Yosef, see Yalkut Yosef siman 489 seif 10) rules that someone who becomes bar mitzvah during the omer may not continue to count with a beracha, even if he had been careful to count every day leading up to then. Sephardim are very careful about the principle of safek berachot l'hakel and in almost any circumstance ...


8

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l writes that there were halachic and kabbalistic reasons to switch from בעומר to לעומר in the counting (as discussed in the commentaries to Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 489:1). However, there was no real need to be so particular about dates and the like, so the older form was retained there. (This is similar to what Curiouser wrote ...


8

From Nefesh HaRav by Rabbi Herschel Schachter, shlita,: "The Rishonim [end of Tractate Pesachim] ask the following: 'Why don't we count Sefirat HaOmer each night twice [i.e., "today is the second day," and "today is the first day," etc.] due to the doubtful day?' "HaRav Joseph B. Soloveitchik, zt"l, heard a reason why we do not do ...


8

See Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 489:4 that when one says tonight is such and such during Bein HaShemashos (the period of twilight when it is possibly day, possibly "night") one may no longer count again with a blessing. The M.B. seif katan 21 says that one has fulfilled ones obligation b'dieved (after the fact) even not having said "of the Omer". Since one ...


8

Nusach Ari (as arranged by R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi) counts it before Aleinu. Shaar Hakollel (49:7) explains that this way, the kaddish recited after Aleinu also covers the chapter of Tehillim (Psalm 67) and the verses from the Torah (Lev. 23:15-16) recited after the sefirah. Mishnah Berurah (489:2) gives another reason: this way it's done as early as ...


8

Shaalos U'Teshuvos Rabbi Akiva Eiger 29 says that someone who wrote the number of the day of Sefira he must count still with a Bracha והדבר ברור שצריך לחזור ולספור בברכה. Birchei Yosef 489:14 discusses someone who wrote a letter and in the letter wrote the number of the day in Sefira - that he has to count with a Bracha לאו כמספר בפיו ולא עלתה לו. ...


7

See HALACHICALLY SPEAKING, Customs During Sefira Part 11: Shaving for a date One is not permitted to shave during his custom of sefira even if he has a date.(99) (99)Harav Yisroel Belsky Shlita, see Piskei Shmuos pages 62-63 quoting the opinion of Harav Elyashiv Shlita.


7

The Levush (489, end of 1) writes: 1) It's part of Yom Tov so it's included in the Shehecheyanu of Yom Tov, 2) Since Sefira was in anticipation for Matan Torah which is the main Simcha, it doesn't make sense to say Shehecheyanu on something we are anticipating for before that day arrives! The Ba'er Heitev (5) brings that the reason is that Shehecheyonu is ...


7

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


6

The Torah commands us to count the Omer "מהחל חרמש בקמה" (Devarim 16:9), ("When the sickle 'begins' with the stalks"). Thus, it is assumed that the Omer should be counted when the stalks for the Korban Omer should be cropped. The mitzva of קצירת העומר (cropping of the omer) applies at night (Menachos 71a), and it is disputed amongst the Rishonim whether it ...


6

The Mishna Berura (489 sk 22) posits that if you don't say the number of weeks (on a night where there are weeks to count) in response to a friend then you may continue to count with a bracha later that night. This is a combination of a number of considerations. First, there is a machloket if the weeks count is an absolute requirement (l'ikuva) on every ...


6

This is the ruling of Rabbi Yosef Karo in Shulchan Aruch OC 489:8 and Rabbi Moshe Isserles does not comment. Additionally, Aruch haShulchan (:15) and Shulchan Aruch haRav (:25) cite this ruling approvingly and Mishna Berura (:38) does not note any dissenters.


5

Rav Hutner allowed it because he felt there is no real true simcha from taped Music that will bring you to dancing and since that is the reason for the Issur he allowed it during sefira.By extension of the same logic Reb Shlomo Zalman in his sefer on Pesach allows Chazunis and classical music too of course he adds it is better to be stringent.Reb Pinchas ...


5

Not having a television, and not being a big music guy anyways, I've only seen bits of the program at my fathers house while it was on, and that was many years ago. Nevertheless from memory and/or assumption I would suggest the following issues: T.V. in and of itself isn't so poshut (simple, i.e. it isn't a given that it is permitted in the first place, I ...


5

To tie up everything that's been said (and more): Nusach Ashkenaz generally say BaOmer at the end Nusach Sefard generally say LaOmer at the end Nusach of Sefardim (i.e. Edut Mizrach) say LaOmer before the weeks Nusach of Teiman say the count like the Nusach of Sefardim, except they say it in Aramaic [and say baomer(?)] I have seen (and not confirmed) that ...


5

First, let's address the issue of shaving during the 3 weeks generally. According to R' YB Soloveichik, Shiurei HaRav Al Inyanei Aveilut V'Tisha B'Av, pp. 20-21, there is "a basis for shaving one's beard during this period. He contends that the observances of the three week mourning period are patterned after the twelve month period of mourning that one ...


5

See Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 16 page 5: When Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday (as it does this year) shaving etc. is permitted on Friday because of kovod for Shabbos. The reason why it is kovod for Shabbos is because by the mincha before Lag B’omer one does not say tachnun, so technically shaving would permitted on Shabbos, but since one can ...


5

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach, vol. 3, 50:11) cites authorities on both sides of the issue: The bar mitzvah boy and his father are indeed allowed to take haircuts (Mekor Chaim); They are not (Rivevos Ephraim); The boy can have his hair cut before his actual bar mitzvah date, when he's still a minor and not fully obligated (Divrei Shalom); If his hair is really ...


5

From Halachically Speaking, Volume 3 Issue 16: Some poskim say one who has not yet counted the sefira of Lag B’omer should avoid telling someone else today is Lag B’omer, since doing so may be considered counting the day.78 Other poskim permit this since his intention is not to count the day, rather he is referring to the name of the day since it is ...


5

While saying this paragraph [Ana Bechoach], one should look at - or envisage - the Sheimos (Divine Names) formed by the acronyms of its words, but one should not pronounce them. http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/sefer-haminhagim/28.htm#t206


5

Piskei Teshuvos 493:7 cites the Sefer "Bein Pesach Le'Shavuos" (9:11) in the name of R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach and R' Shmuel Vozner that plucking eyebrows or eyelashes during Sefiras Haomer is permitted although it is done for beatification, since this is not characterized as "תספורת" (cutting). Rabbi Gavriel Zinner also brings this ruling in Nitei Gavriel ...


5

The Arizal is brought by R' Chaim Vital in Pri Eitz Chaim (Shaar 22 Sif Zayin) and Shaar Hakavonos (Inyan Sefiras Haomer); see also Birkey Yosef (493:6) and Kaf HaChaim (:12). The reason is based on Kabbalah, and not related to the mourning of sefira, which is why it applies during the sheloshes yemei hagbala till Erev Shavuos, and according to most also on ...


4

See Moishe Dovid Lebovits, "Lag B'Omer," 5 Towns Jewish Times: Night or Day. Many have the custom to make the bonfires (and dancing) on the night of Lag B’omer. Others say that the simcha should start at day.85 However, it seems that the minhag is to conduct the bonfire and dancing at night all over the world, not only in Meron.86 ...


4

Shulchan Aruch Harav (489:12) says that if one mistakenly counted the Omer after plag haminchah, he should re-count later, but without a berachah - in deference to Tosafos' opinion that plag haminchah can be considered the beginning of the night for purposes of saying Shema. Based on this, I would venture that if the person forgot to re-count later that ...


4

Chok Yaakov 7, Shulchan Aruch Harav 5, Chayei Adom 131:11, Mishnah Berurah 5, Aruch Hashulchan 6, L’Torah V’horah 2: page 19:2 quoting the opinion of Harav Moshe Feinstein, zt’l, Rivevos Ephraim 6: page 294:2, Orchos Rabbeinu 2: page 95:11, see Chok Yaakov 7. This is even according to the Sefardim (Bais Dovid 208). Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday in the ...


4

The source is Shaar HaKavvanot 86d: במ"ט ימים אלו של ימי העומר לא היה מורי האריז"ל מגלח ראשו אלא בערב שבועות ולא היה מגלח לא ביום ראש חודש אייר ולא ביום ל"ג בעומר בשום אופן. During the 49 days of the Omer my teacher the Arizal would not shave his head except on Erev Shavuot, he would not shave on Rosh Chodesh Iyyar and not on Lag B'Omer for ...



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