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10

Rabbi Moshe Isserlis writes (YD 275:6) about various scribal traditions including large/small letters that אם שינה לא פסל - if [the scribe] deviated, he did not invalidate [the scroll]. Obviously if they can be fixed, one should do so to conform with the tradition.


8

The Ramma in siman 131 siff 2 brings from the Beis Yosef who quotes a Rokeach -- The Rokeach also writes in siman 324 not to 'fall' unless in front of a seffer torah. And a siman for this is found in the war against Ay (Yehoshua 7, 6) 'and he fel lon his face in front of the aron'." The Beis Yosef concludes by saying if it's accepted (kabbala), ...


7

In the Sefer Avnei Yashfei 4:109:2 was asked if a sefer Torah fell inside the Aron Kodesh does one have to fast. He writes that one does not have to fast(there is more savoros but put in whats applicable here), the main reason being that it is not a place for walking like the Atzei HaLevanon 2:71 writes(he is quoted in previous part of tshuva regarding some ...


6

If the Nun's were not inverted but were left as regular letters, it is kosher bdieved. Source: Sefer Keses Hasofer (Mahadura Tinyana), Chakira 17 (s.v. v'hinei hageonum) citing Noda Beyhudah and others (Sefer Keses Hasofer is the classic source for Hilchos Stam by Rav Shlomo Ganzfried, the author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch and is probably the standard ...


6

Standard Sifrei Torah today have 42 lines in each column. While there are different opinions how many lines a Sefer Torah should be (See Keses Hasofer 13:6), this has not developed solwly out of Halacha. There's a good article about how this came to be here Until some 30 years ago, Sofrim didn't really have a good tikkun to copy from. They either used ...


5

Sefaria has an API that will serve it up as a JSON object.


5

From what I understand, your second question is based on the assumption that every column begins what a Vav. While this seems to be common practice, it is frowned upon by the Poskim who seem to claim that it has no basis in halacha. See for example the Keseth HaSofer at the end of Ch. 4 - and the footnote there. He claims that the ווי העמודים - as it's ...


4

We use a torah scroll for the torah service because that is the halacha (see here citing Rama (OC 143:2)). Just because there's a more "convenient" format doesn't mean we're free to change how we perform public worship. (I mean, why not skip books entirely and project the text onto the wall, in that case? But we don't, even on weekdays when there'd be no ...


4

The Magen Avraham (44, 5) refers to the custom of fasting if a sefer torah or tefillin fall onto the ground. He does indeed use the words 'al haaretz'. (Seemingly the only difference between sefer torah or tefillin in this law is that one fasts for a sefer torah falling even if it was in its wrapping/container.) The Mishna Berura cites the Magen Avraham (40, ...


4

No. The miniature Sefer Torah in your link is not a Kosher Sefer Torah. As per Rabbi Doniel Neustadt a non Kosher Torah does not receive the same respect of a Kosher Torah. And it seems to me that he is talking about a Torah that can be Kosher and became non Kosher. You are questioning regarding a Tirah that was never Kosher and is impossible to become ...


4

There are two factors determining the start of columns in sifrei torah: Halacha requires that certain words be at the top of the column. The acronym for these words is בי"ה שמו, the mem of which is מה טובו as you noted. Despite the best efforts of earlier poskim including Keset Hasofer, it is traditional for all other columns to begin with the letter ...


4

Mechon Mamre's "תיקון קוראים" (also downloadable) has each word of the Pentateuch in a separate span element; pasuk-final words have different attributes in those elements. This is thus a machine-parseable Pentateuch with machine-parseable delineation of p'sukim, which seems to be what you seek.


3

DoubleAA is correct that a Torah that is missing scribal traditions is still valid. However, if another Torah is available, the Torah inconsistent with tradition should not be used. (see Shevet HaLevi 4, Yoreh Deah 141) In addition, if the Torah was from a tradition that normally conforms with the small and large letters and, nevertheless, is consistently ...


3

The nine places where a different letter appears are: מנש(ו)א Genesis 4:13 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni מעינ(ו)ת Genesis 7:11 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni ויהי(ו)‏ Genesis 9:29 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni ת(י)עשה Exodus 25:31 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni האפ(ו)ד Exodus 28:26 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni בשמ(ו)ת Numbers 1:17 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. ...


3

The Mishnah Berurah (146:17) explains the ruling of the Mechaber that one doesn't need to stand for keriat ha-torah, because when the Torah is "in its place" one doesn't need to stand: א"צ לעמוד וכו' - ואפילו העומדים על הבימה דא"צ לעמוד מפני ס"ת אלא כשאדם נושאה אבל כשמונחת במקומה א"צ...וכן אפילו כשאחד תופסה בידו כגון בעת שקורין ההפטרה כיון שהוא יושב במקומו ...


3

I don't believe that there's a 'one size fits all' answer to the more general question of how we define a floor in halakha, but we may be able to extrapolate a few principles. We can import a halakha from the laws of shabbos (and sukka): levud. This means that anything withing 3 tefachim is considered attached. If a step etc. is raised slightly off the ...


2

Since we are going to read from the first sefer torah first, that is the one we take hold of first. On the way back since Hagbah was done with the second Sefer that is the one we return first as in theory that is the one currently in the hand. Source: http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5770/korach.html note 37


2

Rabbi Moshe Isserlis (OC 149) writes: ובמקומות שמצניעין אותו בהיכל, שהוא הארון בבהכ"נ, מצוה לכל מי שעוברת לפניו ללוותה עד לפני הארון שמכניסין אותה שם (ד"ע ומהרי"ל). וכן הגולל ילך אחר הס"ת עד לפני הארון, ועומד שם עד שיחזירו הספר תורה למקומה (הגה' מיימוני פ' י"ב מה"ת) וכן נוהגין במגביה הס"ת, כי הוא עיקר הגולל וכמו שנתבאר; ויש שכתבו שמביאים התינוקות לנשק ...


2

the underlying assumption here is that we need to "help" God to safeguard His torah in case the world gets destroyed or whatever reason. This runs contrary to lots of Jewish hashkafa, such as that God is in control of the world, etc., and the world is headed for redemption, resurrection, etc. Based on that, I think it's a big waste of a kosher sefer torah ...


1

There is no documented reason not to open a Torah Scroll while still inside the Aron haKodesh. Actually, many Sefardim communities seem to have the custom of opening the Torah Scroll while still inside the Aaron haKodesh before taking it out and parading it to the Bimah; often still open so all can peer into it. Personally I roll the Sefer Torah to its ...


1

The Shaare Efrayim does not address this anywhere, which leads me to believe there is no halacha about it. Nor do Taame Haminhagim or the recent books Ishe Yisrael (A. Y. Pfoifer (?), 5758) and Hak'ria Batora V'hilchoseha (Akiva Meler (?), 5769); Aroch Hashulchan and Mishna B'rura seem not to, either. AFAIR, every time I've noticed which way it was done, ...


1

In my shul, we put the first one on the left. I'm really not sure what minhag is followed though, because it's a mixed shul.


1

The Divrei Chaim (Sanz) writes very emphatically about using only a feather from a Kosher bird, though this is an almost-universal practice even among contemporary sefardim (relatively few of whom still use reeds). However the halacha of "min hamuttar l'picha" only applies to the ink and parchment (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 32:5-8) so even those who dispute ...


1

Wow, I was fascinated by the question, so I looked it up... First, an introduction of a central concept: There is a disagreement that wends through the Talmud (like Sanhedrin 4a,b) regarding the words of a Torah scroll whether "Yesh Aim leMikrah" or "Yesh Aim leMesoret". Roughly translated, that means "Primacy is given to how it is read" or "Primacy is ...


1

I think it's to show that both Sifrei Torah are equally Kosher and important. The Shat"z-for-Shachrit carries the first Sefer to the Bima. One could suspect that the Second Sefer is somewhat less equal. The Shatz-for-Mussaf therefore carries the second Sefer back to the Aaron HaKodesh. Since it's natural for the Shat"z to lead the parade back, the second ...


1

Read the Aleppo Codex, by Matti Friedman. It's fascinating and addresses these questions in more detail than any other source. was the text preserved through sifre torah written later, copied off of the original? Were the sifre Torah (and printed Humashim) of Halab based off the Aleppo Codex, and if yes, don't we have any? He says that the elders ...



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