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12

The relevant word is דכא which in some scrolls is written דכה. See Deuteronomy 23:2. While the portion of Aleppo Codex containing that word is currently lost, we do have the Aleppo Codex to Tehillim 90:3 where the same word appears spelled with an Alef. The Mesorah there notes that this spelling is used in three places and lists them: Deuteronomy 23:2, ...


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In Melachim (Kings) Chapters 22-23, King Joshiahu discovers a Torah scroll during renovations of the Temple.


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The מהר'ל in תיפארת ישראל , chapter 63 explains in length that these ketarim are actually secrets and deep ideas, related to concepts foreign to the materialistic perspective of the world. דע כי יש כתרים ותגין על אותיות התורה, שכשם שגוף התיבות מורים על דברי תורה עצמם, כך התגין שהם על האותיות שבתורה מורים על השגות דקות מאוד מאוד יוצאים מן התורה עצמה, ...


4

It's a רש"י in שבת on Daf :י"ג that says: והספר. כל כתבי הקודש תורה נביאים וכתובים פוסלין תרומה במגען


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Computers are used quite effectively for checking for errors in STa"M. Your understanding of how it works is basically correct. The scanned text is compared with a standard which is known to be kosher. The program would have a variety of "standard" versions for different writing styles and column formats. To correct for differences in handwriting, a ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh Deah סימן רעח - דין תפירת ספר תורה says: ב: יָשִׂים בַּסֵפֶר תּוֹרָה שְׁנֵי עַמּוּדִים, אֶחָד בְּרֹאשׁוֹ וְאֶחָד בְּסוֹפוֹ, וּמַה שֶׁשִּׁיֵּר גִּלָּיוֹן בְּרֹאשׁוֹ וּבְסוֹפוֹ יִכְרֹךְ עַל הָעֲמוּדִים וְיִתְפְּרֶנּוּ (ב) בְּגִידִים, וְיִשָּׁאֵר בֵּין הָעַמּוּד לַדַּף שְׁתֵּי אֶצְבָּעוֹת. וּבִשְׁעַת הַדַּחַק, שֶׁאִי אֶפְשָׁר ...


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I just received an email about a similar question from Yagdil Torah Place: Lausanne, Switzerland. Date: 1963 The Swiss government once decided to put together an exhibition including various artifacts and items of interest which would be displayed before the public. One of the items they wanted to display was a sefer Torah, and they asked Rabbi ...


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I know this is a bit late, but some may find this useful: Israel Yevin says that "rolled up pe" (פ' לפופה) and other "curved letters" (אותיות עקומות) appear in Masoretic notes. He says "such forms were only used in a few MSS. The rolled up pe, for instance, is much used in Yemenite MSS." (Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah, p. 48).


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Israel Yeivin, Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (ed. E.J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1985) discusses these "large" and "small" letters (among other peculiarities pertaining to letters) on pp. 47-48 (§§ 84-85). He refers to the Masorah's listing of "a few dozen" examples of large letters, although in the list provided in a previous answer there are 29 ...


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As you were already answered in this post, there's no Halachic reason for the classic Vavei Ha'amudim format. Poskim were actually against it, as it causes unnecessary shrinking/stretching of letters. So there's no reason to worry that some columns adhere to it and others do not.


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I just answered someone else and saw your question and wanted to let you know there is an online safrut course starting on November 15th. All the information can be found here: http://mastery.webyeshiva.org/safrut-certification/


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OK, I'll try to address all the issues including the ones brought up in comments in no particular order, starting with the practical concerns. Mixed k'sav is not an issue. (Source: I have checked mezuzot with mixed k'sav on the same line which Rabbi Dovid Feinstein previously looked at and said were OK. There are some tikkunim that were somewhat-standard ...


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It's not really that the law has changed; it's just that it's become rather moot. The problem was that people would store their holy scrolls (Torah or other parts of Nach) with the "holy food" in the house, i.e. the tithes that had to be given to a Kohen. The problem is that pests eating the food would damage the scrolls. The rabbis therefore decreed that ...


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In actuality the halacha still applies today. This law can be found in the Shulchan Aruch Chapter 147, section 1 and is derived from the Talmud, tractate Megilla 32a. We can see the discussion in Megillah 7a - Kisvei HaKodesh Making Your Hands Tamei Where does this halacha of kisvei hakodesh being metamei come from and why? Rashi references the sugya ...


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The Taz says that if he is ever zocheh to write a Sefer Torah and build an Aron Kodesh, he would build it wide enough to put the Sefer Torah lying down and that is also the seder kriyaso. This means: When we speak about the placement of kisvei hakodesh, not only does the halochah apply to mezuzah and tefillin, but the Taz extends this to Sifrei Torah as ...


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I once saw in the ספר יראים that Rabbeinu Tam himself put it on an angle since it was a חשש on his part. This would explain why when there is no room we aren't careful to put the Mezuza on an angle — since it is a Chumra according to Rabbeinu Tam. (When I find this Yere'im again I hope to link to it or at least point and quote.) Other sources seem to have ...


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http://www.chabad.org.il/Magazines/Article.asp?ArticleID=5655&CategoryID=1254 This Minhag is by no means universal. Minhag Chabad is to specifically wrap the belt around the lower third. The reason this is done so is that we compare it to the Gartel one wears between his heart and his lower body. The Sefer Torah has three parts, Head, Body, Foot. ...


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An error found in a Sefer Torah renders the sefer pasul regardless of where it is found. The passage that you cited in the Shulchan Arukh does not seem to differentiate between a mistake in the part being read and another part, so I cannot imagine why the same procedure would not be followed in that case. I would understand the instruction "ומתחילין ממקום ...


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See this with its cross-refs to Shulchan Aruch: What are the dinim concerning mistakingly touching the klaf of the Sfer Torah: when kissing it with one’s tziztis when doing glila Answer: In both cases one should be careful not to touch the Sefer Torah with bare hands. The Gemara writes that one who touches the parchment of ...


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I actually asked R' Chaim Richman from the Temple Institute about this. He said that it does not mean that a sefer Torah can be written in Greek, but that Greek is the only language the Torah can be accurately be translated into because Hebrew and Greek share common grammar and influction.


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Not all columns do start with vav, not all columns must start with vav, and the custom to make all of them start that way became far more popular some 30 years ago according to http://lavlor.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/how-many-lines-should-my-torah-scroll.html (H/T to Zvi's accepted answer on the linked question). Before Davidovich's tikkun, I understand the ...



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