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8

The relevant word is דכא which in some scrolls is written דכה. See Deuteronomy 23:2. While the portion of Aleppo Codex containing that word is currently lost, we do have the Aleppo Codex to Tehillim 90:3 where the same word appears spelled with an Alef. The Mesorah there notes that this spelling is used in three places and lists them: Deuteronomy 23:2, ...


5

The מהר'ל in תיפארת ישראל , chapter 63 explains in length that these ketarim are actually secrets and deep ideas, related to concepts foreign to the materialistic perspective of the world. דע כי יש כתרים ותגין על אותיות התורה, שכשם שגוף התיבות מורים על דברי תורה עצמם, כך התגין שהם על האותיות שבתורה מורים על השגות דקות מאוד מאוד יוצאים מן התורה עצמה, ...


5

The Taz in hilchos Sefer Torah Yoreh Deah siman 271 s.k. 8 says it is a good ksiva.


3

That's why The Shulchan Aruch Harav (32:20) writes: ומכאן אתה למד שאין צריך לכסות מלפניו שאר האותיות כמו שנוהגין שא"כ אף החכם שמבין הענין שקורא מהיכן יבין לקרות אות זו כהלכתה כיון שאינו יודע ענינה ופירושה ומכל מקום אות שנפסקה בנקב ונשתייר ממנה גם למטה מהנקב צריך לכסות מלפניו מה שלמטה מהנקב לפי שהוא יצרפנה עם מה שלמעלה מהנקב ויקרא האות כהלכתה ...


3

It's a רש"י in שבת on Daf :י"ג that says: והספר. כל כתבי הקודש תורה נביאים וכתובים פוסלין תרומה במגען


2

In the body of your question you ask: Is a Greek Sefer Torah Kosher? Is Greek the only language other than Hebrew that a kosher Sefer Torah can be written in? The answers to these questions are to be found in the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah, Laws of Tefillin, Mezuzah and Sefer Torah Perek 1 Halacha 19: Tefillin and mezuzot may be written only in Assyrian ...


1

OK, I'll try to address all the issues including the ones brought up in comments in no particular order, starting with the practical concerns. Mixed k'sav is not an issue. (Source: I have checked mezuzot with mixed k'sav on the same line which Rabbi Dovid Feinstein previously looked at and said were OK. There are some tikkunim that were somewhat-standard ...


1

It's not really that the law has changed; it's just that it's become rather moot. The problem was that people would store their holy scrolls (Torah or other parts of Nach) with the "holy food" in the house, i.e. the tithes that had to be given to a Kohen. The problem is that pests eating the food would damage the scrolls. The rabbis therefore decreed that ...


1

In actuality the halacha still applies today. This law can be found in the Shulchan Aruch Chapter 147, section 1 and is derived from the Talmud, tractate Megilla 32a. We can see the discussion in Megillah 7a - Kisvei HaKodesh Making Your Hands Tamei Where does this halacha of kisvei hakodesh being metamei come from and why? Rashi references the sugya ...


1

I once saw in the ספר יראים that Rabbeinu Tam himself put it on an angle since it was a חשש on his part. This would explain why when there is no room we aren't careful to put the Mezuza on an angle — since it is a Chumra according to Rabbeinu Tam. (When I find this Yere'im again I hope to link to it or at least point and quote.) Other sources seem to have ...


1

http://www.chabad.org.il/Magazines/Article.asp?ArticleID=5655&CategoryID=1254 This Minhag is by no means universal. Minhag Chabad is to specifically wrap the belt around the lower third. The reason this is done so is that we compare it to the Gartel one wears between his heart and his lower body. The Sefer Torah has three parts, Head, Body, Foot. ...


1

See this with its cross-refs to Shulchan Aruch: What are the dinim concerning mistakingly touching the klaf of the Sfer Torah: when kissing it with one’s tziztis when doing glila Answer: In both cases one should be careful not to touch the Sefer Torah with bare hands. The Gemara writes that one who touches the parchment of ...


1

My answer is reaction to both the previous answer as well as accounting for @DoubleAA's comment. I've had this situation a few times in my shul while I was reading the parsha. Our shul rarely has kids attending. (Sad, somewhat...) When I fiind a questionable mistake, I call the rav. He makes the final decision. Sometimes he can tell, it's definitely no good ...


1

If there is a doubt whether or not a letter is properly formed, a child, who can recognize letters but does not yet know how to read, is brought, and checks the letter. If he identifies it properly, the torah is considered kosher, and the reading continues; if not, the torah is pasul and must be fixed. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 32:16 The Mechaber paskens ...


1

The Chavos Yair says that the reason is that one must sanctify every (individual) name of Hashem before writing it.


1

There are other distinctions, but the biggest one is that a Torah must be written "lishmah" -- with intent. Matza actually doesn't have to be "made" lishma, but must be "guarded" lishmah. If I stand watch over the machine, it may not be my action, but I'm still guarding it. There are other distinctions, for instance the additional level of intent required ...


1

Israel Yeivin, Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (ed. E.J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1985) discusses these "large" and "small" letters (among other peculiarities pertaining to letters) on pp. 47-48 (§§ 84-85). He refers to the Masorah's listing of "a few dozen" examples of large letters, although in the list provided in a previous answer there are 29 ...



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