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1

If we look at 1 Sam 30:16, we see that the Amalekim, having taken the spoils of war, feast and drink and party like there's no tomorrow. In chapter 14, we see the soldiers of Israel also acting in an unbecoming way with the spoils of war. There, Shaul pronounced a curse on any soldier who eats anything during the battle. Of course, being soldiers, they get ...


6

The Talmud (M'nachos 96a) explains that David and his coterie were in mortal danger of starving at the time, which legally supersedes the prohibition against them eating showbread. Another approach, mentioned by the Radak (ad loc.), is that the loaves were loaves from a korban todah (thanksgiving offering) that a non-priest could consume while in a state ...


0

Context / background: This is a red herring used in the New Testament by Yoske in a logically flawed argument to excuse his followers from their desecration of Shabbos. The showbread belonged entirely to the priests. It was not an offering, so it does not need to be treated in the same manner as their portion of the animals brought in the temple. They were ...


0

While this may be more על דרך דרוש or מוסר, one of the answers I have heard is that he saw ברוח קדשו the great קידוש השם that would occur during the time of פורים and he knew if he wiped them out that would not be. The lesson of that is that we don't have the right to make such חשבונות and when we have a מצוה like that to do it doesn't matter what will be.


3

Targum Yonatan, the chief traditional translator of the books of the Prophets, translates this phrase into Aramaic as "גְבַר עָבֵיד רְעוּתֵהּ", which means "a man who does His will." So, "a man after His own heart" would be a reasonable colloquial and literal translation, and indeed is the one chosen by the JPS 1917 translation that was linked into the ...



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