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14

Indeed, a keen observation. This observation is made as well by Abarbanel and Malbim, who both explain that the first time, Shmuel ran to Eli, as he was Eli's servant and he was motivated to serve him properly. However, when he went to Eli, and it turned out Eli had never called him in the first place, he was a bit embarrassed. So the second time, he was ...


14

According to http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~uzwiak/AnatPhys/Cardiovascular_System.html the heart touches the chest wall between the 5th and 6th ribs. So if this passage means that he literally stabbed him at the 5th rib, it would have been a very efficient and quick kill.


11

Rashi to Shmuel Aleph 15:3 explains that the Amalekites were sorcerers and were capable of disguising themselves as animals - and for this reason Shaul was commanded to kill even the animals. In his commentary to Devarim 25:19 he brings another explanation: The eradication of the memory of Amaleik had to be absolute, and even if animals remained alive they ...


9

David's status after his anointing and before Shaul's death was actually, according to Megillah 14b, the subject of a halachic dispute between him and Avigayil. David himself held that he was a king for all purposes, and that therefore Naval (who had denied his men food and insulted him - I Sam. 25) was a rebel against the monarchy and could be put to death ...


9

"The box in which the Philistines sent a gift to the G-d of Israel was placed next to it" (Bava Basra 14a). To expand on Shalom's answer: The basic reason that the Philistines made these particular images is that these were the plagues they had been struck with (I Sam. 5:6 and Rashi there). Malbim (to 6:4-5) explains that the Philistine "priests and ...


9

M'tzudos quotes Rabi Yochanan as saying that that spot is particularly dangerous because of the presence there of the liver and gallbladder.


8

The Hebrew is משתין בקיר, mashtin b'kir. Mashtin is used frequently in the Talmud for "urinate", and kir is wall. So David is saying "there won't be left alive even one thing-that-urinates-against-the-wall." The classical commentaries say that means either a male human being, or a dog. Either way, it was intended as a disparaging reference. Many English ...


8

This example does not seem to be one of Biblical errancy. Rashi was saying that the author of this particular work within the Bible chose a derogatory nickname, replacing Baal for the negative Boshet. (Or perhaps even contemporaries of Ish Boshet called him that.) Rashi was not saying that scribes edited out Ish Boshet and replaced the original Biblical ...


8

The Chidushei HaGriz (§ 161) comments that the narrative between Shmuel and Shaul is a basis for the Rambam's opinion in 6:4. In verse 18, Sh'mu'el says that Sha'ul was told to destroy אֶת-הַחַטָּאִים אֶת-עֲמָלֵק: And the LORD sent thee on a journey, and said: Go and utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites, and fight against them until they be ...


7

This is discussed, of course, by Abarbanel, first thing in Sefer Shmuel. An initial glance at the names of the books of Tanach shows us that the books are not necessarily named for their authors, especially in this case being that Shmuel clearly did not author a large portion of Sefer Shmuel. Rather, books are named for their content. There are two ways to ...


7

As you said, Ralbag (and most of the commentaries) understand this to be talking about statues of some kind. (Metzudas David to 5:8 also cites this as a second explanation.) So according to that view of things, David had nothing against the blind and lame people any more than against any of the other Jebusites. Metzudas David's first explanation (to 5:6), ...


6

Targum Jonathan consistently translates this phrase (it also appears a few times in I and II Kings) as ידע מדע, "one who knows knowledge." Rashi explains that he gets this from the Hebrew by taking משתין as related to משית, "arranges" or "sets," so that it can be translated as "one who arranges [his thoughts] in the walls of his heart" - i.e., an adult with ...


6

Malbim (I Shmuel 1:1) believes that "ויהי איש אחד" specifies that this man is unique in purpose (מיוחד). [He gets this idea from a midrash that I unfortunately cannot find.] Here, Elkana is "uniquely destined" as Shmuel's father. The other example Malbim brings is from Shoftim 13:2: "ויהי איש אחד מצרעה", referring to Manoach. Manoach was not necessarily a ...


6

Presumably he thinks he's speaking to Eli. Malbim explains accordingly: Shmuel's "Hineni" in v. 4 is to tell Eli, "I'm not sleeping!" and then he runs over to see just what Eli wants from him. The second and third times, then (vv. 6 and 8), he doesn't need to repeat this phrase, because Eli already knows he's awake; he just goes over and says, "I am here ...


6

Gen. 1:5 states: ויקרא א-להים לאור יום, ולחשך קרא לילה "G-d called the light 'day', and the darkness He called 'night.'" So the name of Hashem is omitted in the second half of the verse. This leads R. Elazar to comment (Bereishis Rabbah 3:6) that "G-d does not associate His name with evil, only with good."


6

According to Divrei HaYomim 1 8:33 and Divrei Hayomim 1 9:39 his real name was Ashba'al. ונר הוליד את קיש וקיש הוליד את שאול ושאול הוליד את יהונתן ואת מלכי שוע ואת אבינדב ואת אשבעל The Radak explains why he is called Ish Boshes since his name ended in Ba'al it was translated to Boshes, and according to Rashi it was changed to Boshes as a deragortory to ...


6

Both RaDaK and Malbim understand that David was not telling Shelomo to execute Shime'i outright, but each saw it to be done differently: RaDak writes( on MelakhimI 2:8): ירד לקראתי - שאמחול לו ונשבעתי לו שלא אמיתנו, אף על פי שנשבעתי לו שלא אמיתנו, חייב מיתה הוא, ולשמור שבועתי לא תמיתנו, עד שתמצא לו עלה ועון וסבב אתה הדבר שיבא לידי עון, שיהיה לך דין ...


5

בליעל appears many times in Tanach and appears to be a compound word: בלי (=without) and יעל. Three possible meanings are given here: בלי יעל where יעל derives from the root ע-ל-ה = to go up. The people are 'without going up' implying they will go down to Gehonim. בלי יעל where יעל derives from the root י-ע-ל = purpose (like the words הועיל and תועלת). ...


5

To begin with, Saul only ordered the execution of Achimelekh's Beit Av( Samuel I 22:16): ויאמר המלך, מות תמות אחימלך: אתה, וכל-בית אביך And the king said: 'Thou shalt surely die, Ahimelech, thou, and all thy father's house.' The massacre at Nov was Doeg's own initiative( ibid. 22:18-19): ויאמר המלך, לדויג (לדואג), סב אתה, ופגע בכהנים; ויסב דויג ...


5

So I found that MhrSh"A and Eyun Jacob each offer answers. MhrS"A says that David saw her thigh from 3 parasangs away. So she did not do it in front of him, rather it was a more incidental occurence. Abigail probably thought that she was sufficiently secluded. E"J says that Abigail, sensing the tension between her husband Nabel and David, uncovered herself ...


4

Radak (to v. 8) explains simply: one or two times it might indeed have been Shmuel's imagination (thinking in his sleep that someone was calling him), but three times means that Shmuel really had heard something. Since no one else was there except Eli and Shmuel, Eli understood that it must be a Divine voice. He also quotes Ibn Ezra, who says that it's ...


4

Eliezer is praying when Rivka approaches. When he recaps the story to her family, he says "I was still meditating (or speaking to my heart)", they may not have understood "prayer", but they understood "meditation." Note that the entire book of Shir HaShirim has only a half-mention of G-d's name, "shalhevetya" can mean either "its flame" or "a G-dly flame." ...


4

And the men of Israel said, "Have you seen this man who is coming up, for he is coming up to taunt Israel? And it will be, that the man who will kill him, the King will enrich him with great riches, and he will give him his daughter, and he will make his father's house free in Israel." Rashi: "'And he will make his father’s house free': from ...


4

Radak explains "His arms-bearer saw that Shaul dies" with i.e., close to death… but he did not die yet until the [reporter] killed him…. Alternatively, Radak continues, it's possible the [reporter] lied: he didn't kill him but found him dead after [Shaul] had fallen on his sword. He said [he'd killed Shaul] to appeal to David…. Ralbag (Ⅰ Sh'muel ...


4

Ibn Ezra (Shemot 28:6 Peirush Aroch) suggests that someone who was familiar with asking through the Urim VeTumim would be capable of getting answers on occasion from the Ephod. (I think he is referring to the two stones on the shoulders that clipped to the Choshen, but I'm not sure.) Thus David used the Ephod (which we know he had, per 23:6) and Shaul used ...


3

No one knows for sure since no reason is given in the text (the T'anach/the Bible). Therefore the question is open to conjecture within the commentaries and midrashim. @msh210 gives an answer from the commentaries of Rabbi Moshe Alshich. Another answer: it was "professional courtesy" -- while Saul was willing to kill the people, he decided to spare his ...


3

Sefer Magen Shaul explains why in Shmuel2 13:39 it says Dovid HaMelech instead of HaMelech Dovid. He says that at this point Dovid lost the strength of Malchus by losing interest in chasing after AvSholom. Therefore the word HaMelech is placed after his name in this instance.


3

The people wanted a king so that they could more closely resemble the other nations (Sh'muel I, 8:5,20; Radak ad loc.). This motivation made their desire for a king contemptible (Sanhedrin 20b; Sh'muel I, 8:7-8; cf. D'varim 17:14-15), despite the fact that, according to some opinions, there is a biblical obligation to appoint a king (see the dispute in ...


3

Kabbalistically there is a lot of symbolism going on here The Rama M’Fano sees the 7 prophetesses as corresponding to the 7 attributes that God uses to relate to the world, to wit: Chesed, Gevurah, Tiferet, Netzach, Hod, Yesod and Malchus. Avigail is among those 7 and represents the middah of Hod - commonly translated as glory. From this we can ...


3

Radak says "Ain Somchin al hanes" Do not rely on miracles. He also compares it to Yaakov being afraid that Eisav was coming, David fleeing from Shaul and other incidents In Pesachim 8b and Yoma 11a we are told that the protection during the mission is only if the danger is not imminent. In this case, Shmuel asked for natural means to protect himself ...



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