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11

Just to clarify the terms: we wouldn't be talking about Herzl's Zionist movement, since that was founded only in 1897, nine years after R. Hirsch's passing. The reference would be to the various "proto-Zionist" groups and ideologies of his time. (As YDK noted, a lot of the leaders of those movements were indeed secular Jews, although it is only fair to note ...


7

The Pesukim tell us that the Tzefarde'a went into their homes, bedrooms, bodies and even ovens. וְעָלוּ וּבָאוּ בְּבֵיתֶךָ וּבַחֲדַר מִשְׁכָּבְךָ וְעַל מִטָּתֶךָ וּבְבֵית עֲבָדֶיךָ וּבְעַמֶּךָ וּבְתַנּוּרֶיךָ וּבְמִשְׁאֲרוֹתֶיךָ There was no place in Egypt to hide from them, hence "no Egyptians would have survived". The Arov did not have as much ...


7

http://www.shemayisrael.com/publicat/hazon/tzedaka/beliefinone.htm The belief of our people in the Redeeming One inspired other oppressed people to have faith in eventual salvation. For example, Rabbi Hirsch mentions that this faith in eventual salvation gave “hope to the black slave in the plantation” (The Hirsch Haggadah, page 265). Rabbi Hirsch ...


6

According to Hebrew Wikipedia he received Semicha from the Chacham Tzvi. קיבל סמיכה מאת החכם צבי Still following the trail at Hebrew WP, he, in turn, learned from his grandfather, R' Ephraim Hakohen (אפרים הכהן), author of the commentary Machaneh Ephraim on the Torah. He, in turn, learned from R' Moshe Lima (משה לימא), author of the commentary ...


5

Here's (PDF) an interesting essay-length one that was recently forwarded to me.


4

To further Alex's answer: Many forms of proto-Zionism believed that Judaism could only survive with Jews living on their own in their own country; Hirsch fiercely believed that the Jew could live as a good citizen but a foreigner. Hirsch was opposed to most forms of collaboration with non-observant Jews. The teachers of secular studies in his educational ...


4

http://www.hhjudaica.com/rabbi-samson-raphael-hirsch.html I. Grunfeld, Three Generations: The Influence of Samson Raphael Hirsch on Jewish Life and Thought (1958) J. L. Blau, Modern Varieties of Judaism (1966).


4

To paraphrase R' Hirsch's comments on Sh'mos 20:7: The Talmud (Sh'vu'os 20b) remarks that the words zachor (remember) and shamor (guard/observe) were said at the same time. This indicates that these two aspects of Shabbos are intertwined. The Jewish Sabbath does not entail mere spiritual recollection. Such an approach would rob Shabbos of its essential ...


3

Excerpts from "Orthodox Approaches to Biblical Slavery" by Gamliel Shmalo - which appeared in The Torah u-Maddah Journal Volume 16 2012-2013 http://daattorah.blogspot.co.il/2014/06/biblical-slavery-and-morality.html Rav S. R. Hirsch (Shemos 12:44): The consideration of certain circumstances is necessary, correctly to understand the fact that the Torah ...


2

The debate well-known by historians is whether the Orthodox synagogues in Germany could belong under the same umbrella organization that contained the Reform ones. (The government recognized -- and funded -- religious organizations.) Rabbi Hirsch insisted that they disengage, even if if that meant that you couldn't be buried in the same Jewish Communal ...


2

http://www.stevens.edu/golem/llevine/rsrh/danziger_tide.pdf


1

Hirsch Chumash - typographically and linguistically, the Feldheim is more legible than the Judaica Press. It was newly translated (the JP version was translated a while ago), so it will make for an easier read than the older version. Nineteen Letters - can be found here for pay (good print) and here for free (older translation, older print; still legible ...



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