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6

I've never heard of the salt representing a preservative. It is, primarily, to represent the salt used for Korbanoth, as the table is representative of the Mizbeaḥ. In fact, I once had a Rav who would specifically not use salt Friday night, as there are no Korbanoth that are meant to be brought on Friday night. Furthermore, according to this Minhag, the ...


6

The koshering process as done today is fairly straightforward: Half-hour soak in water, then rinse. Apply "kosher" salt all over (internal cavities too), then leave it there for an hour. Triple rinse. So yes, it is likely the finished product will be saltier than meat that was never treated with salt. (As I heard it, there was a sad case recently of ...


6

The Remah (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 576:2) says that some people have the custom to eat eggs at the Seder, as a sign/remembrance of mourning. He posits two reasons: The first night of Pesach is always the same day of the week as Tisha Be'av To remember the destruction of the Temple. Where it not for the destruction we would be eating the Korban Pesach. ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Sichos Kodesh 5741 vol 3. pg. 408) explains that the meaning of "טיבול" (dipping) here is in a liquid that necessitates washing hands prior such as the Karpas in salt-water, or the Marror in Charoses (that contains wine). However, dipping bread in dry salt is not considered "טיבול". [In that talk, the Rebbe made reference to a Torah ...


4

The Encyclopedia Yehudit suggests the salt water is for the following reasons, though I don't know what the source is for what is written there or if the suggestion offered is their own. This does relate to the reason given for the egg as having to do with the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash - http://www.daat.ac.il/encyclopedia/value.asp?id1=2351): 1) ...


3

The laws of breaking bread are in O Ch 167 and with the exception of starting the cut are no different as mentioned there between Shabbos and weekday. See the same question asked at Ohr Someach. The use of salt is mentioned in Seif 5 where the expression מלח או לפתן ‏ is used לפתן being something eaten with bread. There are situations in which salt may not ...


3

Since one has 72 hours(Geonim) from shechita to do nikkur and melicha I would assume that it was done first because aging takes more than 3 days.


3

Before, presumably. A law was instituted by the Gaonim that if you're planning on salting meat to extract the blood (rather than broiling it), it must be soaked or at least hosed down within the first 72 hours after slaughter -- and then every 72 hours after that.


3

The unsalted meat should not come in contact with any kosher food or vessels until the process of salting is completed. Step one: Take the meat and wash it well then soak it in a special vessel (used specifically for this) for a half hour (Rama 69:1). When finished soaking let the water drip off before salting. If using a knife to cut open clots or to just ...


1

The mana fell each morning. This means that each morning's portion lasted for lunch and dinner in that order. So based on your logic, either we should use 2 loaves on Friday day and Friday night, or only on Saturday day and Saturday night. Both of these ideas are not mentioned anywhere I know of as the rule of 2 loaves is found only regarding Shabbat. Thus, ...



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