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From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


2

Pasted from my answer to this question: Stretching letters is not a matter of custom, but one of practicality. Halacha requires the columns be justified. Microsoft Word handles justifies text by widening spaces between words and letters. You can't do this in a sefer torah, so the sofer stretches letters instead. Good tikkunim minimize the number of "short" ...


0

The Israel Museum has a library of sifrei torah that can be used for this purpose as does the Jewish Museum in NYC.


2

I'm not sure how to answer this question for anyone but myself. The barest minimum requirement for writing a sefer torah is that it be legible. The ink must be black, and the traditional fonts pretty much require all the letters to be very bold. In that sense the sofer does not have to worry about usability because halacha and minhag do the worrying for ...


4

There are two factors determining the start of columns in sifrei torah: Halacha requires that certain words be at the top of the column. The acronym for these words is בי"ה שמו, the mem of which is מה טובו as you noted. Despite the best efforts of earlier poskim including Keset Hasofer, it is traditional for all other columns to begin with the letter ...


6

Standard Sifrei Torah today have 42 lines in each column. While there are different opinions how many lines a Sefer Torah should be (See Keses Hasofer 13:6), this has not developed solwly out of Halacha. There's a good article about how this came to be here Until some 30 years ago, Sofrim didn't really have a good tikkun to copy from. They either used ...



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