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The idea that G~d does not have emotions does not make sense unless we think od G~d knowing ablout emotions but not experiencing them. In order for G~d to understand us he must understand how our emotions affect our behaviour. To do this he must experience emotions in the way we experience them, otherwise he is not completely informed. To experience them the ...


7

The Rambam referenced in the question actually deals with the many times in Tanach in which we ascribe emotions to Hashem. In chapter 55 in Moreh Nevuchim, the Rambam discusses Hashem's "emotion" as a literary device used to convey meaning to us an audience. Emotions and moods are transient in nature, and are impossible for the unchanging perfection of ...


5

I believe this is addressed in Rabbi J David Bleich's article in Tradition, "Liability for Harm Caused by Metaphysical Forces" The Talmud in Bava Kama has plenty of cases where our courts can't punish someone, but Heaven will demand punishment (e.g. various cases of psychological damage); there's also talk about if you render your friend's wine or cow ...


1

The links you provide have to do with giving up one's life to prevent committing a sin. I'll answer according to your question on rabbinical violations that carry a death penalty. There is a baraita found throughout the Talmud (such as Ber. 4b) which states: וכל העובר על דברי חכמים חייב מיתה Anyone who transgresses the pronouncements of the Sages ...


3

It can't possibly be referring to the supervisor's a walking stick, as you may not bring a walking stick into the Har haBayit, as we learn in Brachot (Mishna 9:5): לֹא יִכָּנֵס לְהַר הַבַּיִת בְּמַקְלוֹ Add a third Mishna and you have a solution. Makos Ch. 3:12-13 describes that when giving Malkus (the 39 lashes), the instrument used had a handle 1 ...


0

I think there's a strong argument to be made (according to the philosophy of e.g. the Maharal) that even what we classically think of as "reward"/"punishment" is also the natural consequence of a divinely ordained system no less organized than the natural laws. So the person can blame himself in those cases too (and G-d is behind all incidents). (Or-short ...


3

Chovos Halevavos Shaar Bitachon ch.4 Likewise, one should not put himself in danger while trusting on the decree of the Creator [that he will live a set time], drinking poisonous drink or going to battle lions or other dangerous animals without necessity, or to cast himself into the sea or into fire, or other similar things that a man is not sure ...


3

While I haven't heard it myself, a friend of mine who is a major fan of Rav Avidgor Miller, and often listens to his tapes, told me the following story. Someone's car was stolen, and he asked Rav Miller what it meant. Rav Miller responded that "You are being punished for leaving your car unlocked on the streets in Brooklyn!" (The lesson of that particular ...


5

We know that everything that happens is from Hashem (see M"Y Shaar Yirah and countless other sources). But when a person wasn't careful, he has only himself to blame for his misfortune. The Mesilas Yesharim writes (in Shaar Hazerizus, Chapter 9) that a person who is careless is culpable for lack of care, and deserves any punishment he gets for the sin of ...


6

Tosefos to Bava Kamma 85a says this is exactly what the Torah comes to teach with the repetition of the words "רפא ירפא": שנתנה רשות לרפאות - א"ת והא מרפא לחודיה שמעינן ליה וי"ל דה"א ה"מ מכה בידי אדם אבל חולי הבא בידי שמים כשמרפא נראה כסותר גזירת המלך קמ"ל דשרי (Rough translation) - One may have thought that there is no right to seek healing from a ...


3

I don't think the ability to differentiate rulings for magical practices is simple. See for instance Menachos 65a top Tosafos in the name of Rav Hai Gaon that explains the qualification of 'Baalei Kishaphim' to be on the Sanhedrin, is the knowledge of the craft to know how to rule for real magic verses trickery. There is a similar explenation in the ...


2

See the introduction to the Minchat Elazar. There he discusses the concept of forgetfulness and proves that it is part of nature. For example, an old man who has forgotten his Torah (זקן ששכח תלמודו) is still to be shown respect, which would not be the case if his forgetting was due to negligence. It seems to me that the same would apply to the value/reward ...


0

In defining the commandment to learn / teach Torah, although Rambam encurages one to retain his learning (e.g. Hil. Talmud Torah 1:12), he doesn't mention memory as an integral component of the mitzva. As such, one would presumably receive reward even if he forgot. (SHM Assei 11; Hil. Talmud Torah).


0

Firstly, if one hears something directly from a heavenly source, one can reasonably believe that it's an exception. But more to the point, Elisha had reason to believe that he qualified anyways. The Mishna in Shanhedrin Daf 90a states that one of the categories of people who lose their portion in the world to is one who reads literature categorized as ...



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