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13

From: http://www.rationalistjudaism.com/2013/01/on-eagles-wings.html One ornithologist writes: "Many ornithologists have thought that the Bible picture of an eagle carrying her young was merely figurative, but in recent years certain reliable observers have actually seen a parent bird let its young rest for a moment on the feathered back - ...


11

Unfortunately, indeed we do not have prophets today, and Chazal say that the last prophets were Hagai, Zecharia and Malachi. Rashi's momentous perush on most of the Bible and most of the gemara speak for themselves, however here are a few quotes (loose translations by me, except for the last Rashi) about his special work (this list can go on forever): The ...


7

Rav Ozer Alport in his Parsha Potpourri Points to Ponder addresses this issue: Question: How was Lot able to intercede in order to save one of the cities (Tzo'ar) from destruction (19:18-22) when Avrohom, who was even greater and who argued even more on their behalf, was unable to do so? (Yad Yechezkel, Ayeles HaShachar, Derech Sicha) Answer: 1) ...


5

You can get it all online here or buy this ArtScroll set. You can also go old school and get the JPS set (that's the link for Devarim).


5

Here's a more colloquial translation of what they're trying to accomplish: Some rely on their chariots, and some on their horses, but as for us? We call out in the name of God! (There is no double-we in the Hebrew, though the word nazkir is already conjugated as "we will call out", so the preceding word va-anachnu, "and we", gives it similar stress and ...


4

Rashi says that Hashem set this up in order to honor Moshe. Once he set it up then it became possible for the Leviim to continue setting it up and taking it down. My son said at his son's bris (Yom shlishi Parshas Pekudei) that because of the kedusha of the mishkan, not even Moshe could (physically) put up the walls. Hashem had Moshe act and He caused the ...


4

When I learned Menachos by R Dovid Soloveitchick Shlita he would learn both Rashi's - the upper one he referred to as Rashi-in-der-hoich, and the other as Rashi csav-yad. I don't remember the specific order in which he learned them. If he learned both versions, you can be sure his father did too. In fact, the Gri"z stencil on Menachos does 'handel' with both ...


4

Continue to verses 36–39 and all will become clear: When [the Jews] will sin to You… and You will place them before an enemy, and their captors will capture them to a distant or near land, and [the Jews] will return their hearts in the land where they'll have been captured…. Those verses speak of captivity. Verse 24 doesn't say the Jews were captured ...


4

The rhetorical usage of "Oh yeah, we'll see what will be with that" is modern, but the proper usage of ונראה is the future tense, waiting to see what will happen as a result of their actions.


4

Rashi on AZ 6a says that the prohibition of doing business with idolaters close to their holidays (lest they offer thanks to their god(s)) applies to Christians. (The Talmud says the cited prohibition applies to נוצרי which Rashi defines as 'those who follow the mistake of Jesus who commanded them to make a holiday on Sunday.) Note the word "Minim" has ...


4

Rashbam on that verse brings the same idea as Rashi, but explains further. The event that allows Moshe to enter the tent was the cloud being "reduced" (מצומצם) such that it only was over the ark (and not the entire tent). In his words (and my translation): ולא יכול משה לבא אל אהל מועד – בשעת הקמתו, כי שכן עליו הענן – מיד, להראות חיבתו של הקב״ה על ישראל....


3

The braitta (Sotah 11b) is suggesting that they provided for them even beyond their initial infancy, to the point where they could be self-sufficient (i.e. "וַתְּחַיֶּיןָ" suggests that "they enabled the boys to live"). Possibly, at that stage of the anti-Hebrew decrees, Pharaoh was only requiring feticide or partial-birth abortion, not outright ...


3

Did Rashi's works even reach the lands in which the Rambam lived? To summarize Prof. Shamma Friedman's piece, scholars in the early 20th century assumed from Rambam's silence, that he did not have access to Rashi's works, and furthermore, that they were generally unavailable in Egypt at that time. Additionally, we can infer from Rambam's early ...


3

Yaakov said this and the Torah is repeating word for word what Yaakov said. Rashi is saying that Yaakov said אֵפוֹא, even though it was redundant. Not that the Torah has a redundant word.


3

The Daf Yomi Advancement Forum - dafyomi.co.il - has an English point-by-point translation of every Tosfos in the Maseches, in its entirety. They cover the entire Shas until the end of Avoda Zara - and I'm sure they are working on the last few Mesachtot. Each Tosfos starts with a summary, and then each phrase is brought in the original and then explained ...


3

Based in Rashi in the parallel story in I Melachim 7:40 it would seem that the Rashi you quote has a missing heading - the words וְאֶת הַיָּעִים. It should be וַיַּעַשׂ חוּרָם אֶת הַסִּירוֹת — סירות נחשת. וְאֶת הַיָּעִים — שעשוים לחתות הדשן לתת לתוך הסירות This then matches Rashi in Melachim - who first says הכירות הן הן סירות and then: הכיורות. ...


3

This is an excellent question! I don't think that I can answer it definitively, but the following information might be of use to you. If you have a look at Avraham Grossman's Rashi (trans. Joel Linsider; The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, 2012), you will see that he features a bit of a discussion of this issue on pp145-147. He quotes various ...


3

Rashi in Bereishis 1:26 mentions the Pasuk in Melachim that refers to right and left of Hashem. Rashi continues, Is there a right and left of Hashem? Only it means those saying merits, which is referred to as 'right', and those condemning, referred to as 'left'. This clearly shows Rashi not accepting corporeality. As for the Rashi in question, it is more ...


3

Any Jewish book store near where you live or online. Judaica World, Judaica Press, Koren, ArtScroll, World of Judaica, Eichlers, and even Amazon will have this. You can even go online and find it for free at ... http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/63255/jewish/The-Bible-with-Rashi.htm


2

With regards to the short Amah, Rashi in Sukkah 5b (s"v Hanicha) says that there are three types of amos: 5 tefachim (20 etzba'os), 6 tefachim (24 etzba'os) and 6 tefachim + 1/2 etzbah (24 1/2 etzba'os). So when he says, "these four are really three" maybe he means that using the small amah of 5 x 4 = 20 tefachim. Using the regular medium amah 6 x 3 = 18 ...


2

It's a good question which will lead you to some very interesting territory. This concept is not to be taken in a straightforward way. It is, after all, appearing in Midrash. Like most things in Midrash, it is alluding to a different concept. The allegory only gives a simple model to make it possible to comprehend a much more complex concept. For an ...


2

Malbim's reading of Song of Songs breaks it into five chapters, plus a coda about an orchard that was worth thousands. Thus: "his song was five, and a thousand."


2

See this short introduction (by R. Mordechai Katzenelnbogen) regarding the commentary of Rashi (page 6 on the site; page 10 of the actual book). He only quotes R. Yaakov Emden (as you did) and R. Tzvi Hirsch Chajes as arguing against the authenticity of the commentary to Avot. But he is certain that Rashi did indeed author a commentary to Avos and attributes ...


2

Rabbi Dovid Feinstein raised this point in a shiur of his and answered that we find instances where angels keep to their duty, but utilize some wiggle room, such as Gabriel who had coals he was supposed to destroy Klal Yisroel, but handed them off to an intermediary angel, thereby cooling them off a bit, in order to spare us from destruction. Hashem did not ...


2

There is a set of Shaarei Tosafos which explains each Tosafos, in Hebrew, really well.


2

Mesivta is a running Hebrew commentary with footnotes which includes a full explanation of Rashi Tosfos and the major issues and how the Rishonim and Achronim deal with it It has about 120 volumes covering all of Shas. You can view some of its features here http://www.oz-vehadar.com/en/department/16/editions-of-the-metivta


2

What is odd about this pasuk is the sequence of tenses. Normally, once we start with a consecutive vav construction (ואמרנו), and the subject stays the same (ie. the sentence is unmarked: there's no contrast involved, or there's not quotation), we continue using consecutive vav. The major exception is when a word intervenes in the clause before the verb, ...


2

I like the question but couldn't find any mifarshim on the Medrash addressing this issue, so I will offer a deflection of the assumptions as an answer. I will argue that Fish, along with plants and bugs, were never meant to be immortal. Their life cycles and death were a matter of nature from day one, (well, from their respective days of creation:). So ...


2

Medrash Rabba 94:7 says as follows. יחצאל שחיצו אלוהות בידן והן מצחצחין בשיניהם ומלעיגים בשפתותיהן My translation - Anyone may correct if they can translate better - "they split idols with their hands, and grinded their teeth, and smirked with their lips" I have heard in the past that when a parent gives a child a name it is a prophecy as to what ...


2

This should not to be taken literally but metaphorically meaning that Onkelos' translation is considered as it were from divine origin, handed to Moses at Sinai. See: Targum Mi'Sinai? by Rafael Binyamin Posen, available in JSTOR here.



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