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An analogy to the way you asked your question can be made to some of the meforshim on the meraglim. There are those that say that the meraglim did not want to have to give up living in the midbar, being protected by the ananei hakavod, eating the man, drinking the miraculous water, being able to learn constantly, and not having to deal with the "real world". ...


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The Maharal in Netzach Yisroel, in a passage explaining the symbolism of eiruv tavshilin, says that those who fulfilled the mitvot in olam hazeh/galus (this world/exile) continue to earn sechar (merit) in ymot hamoshiach (the messianic age). Not desiring ymot hamoshiach, in light of this idea, would then seem to be essentially a denial (emotionally, if not ...


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I remember discussing this at some length some years ago with a rabbi in Ner Israel (in Baltimore. I don't remember which rabbi it was). We were discussing not whether one is considered a "denier" for not wanting mashiach, which is more your question, but why one should want mashiach if it means the end of all our reward-accrual and growth in spiritual ...


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Update for revised question (original is below) R' Chaim Shmulevitz in the Derech L'Chaim commentary to Derech Hashem addresses this question. He asks, the Rambam writes that all the Nevi'im wanted Moshiach so that they could settle down and focus on learning Torah, but לפום צערא אגרא (the reward is commensurate to the struggle/effort), so why would they ...


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Mechon Mamre has the introduction translated interlinearly though not artscroll-style. Sefaria has a number of chapters (see here for one) translated with the english side-by-side, mostly in Sefer HaMadda. Because the translation is crowd-sourced (though moderated for accuracy) that "number" may be larger by the time you click the link. (full disclosure: I ...


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Rabbi Perlstein elaborates on this Rambam, and the way he reads it is that the Rambam is saying first לפייסו is the sinner directly with the wronged party. Then there is an additional obligation to reach out through three different groups of people that they should try to convince the wronged party to forgive the sinner. This is called לפגע. So the first ...


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In the introduction to his commentary on Masekhet Avot (Shemonah Peraqim), chapter five, the Rambam says: והוא הדין מי שהתרגשה עליו מרה שחורה, ועמד והסירה בשמיעת הניגונים ובמיני הזמר, ובטיול בגינות ובבניינים נאים, ובישיבה עם צורות נאות וכיוצא בדברים שמרחיבים הנפש ומסירים הרהוריו הקודרים ממנה.‏ In translation (from Wikisource): Similarly, one ...


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After some consideration, I think the straight forward answer for the Rambam is as follows. The Rambam holds that the purpose of the times of Moshiach is to do Mitzvos to merit Olam Haba. That works nicely for those who will live then, but what about those who lived before? With what will they merit Olam Haba? For that, the answer is Techiyas HaMeisim. ...


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I'll say at the outset this answer will be a little interesting, as it is using Kabbalah to answer the Rambam, but it helps be Mekayim R. Weinberg's answer (although it doesn't quite agree with it, I don't think) and provide another approach to this question. The Tzemach Tzedek writes: הנה באלשיך פ' זו הביא משארז"ל בפ' בראשית שבעלילה בא הקב"ה על אדה"ר ...



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