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Etymologically, the verb כתר (from whence we get the Hebrew noun, כתר, meaning "crown") means to surround, or encircle. In the Aramaic pael (as perhaps in Job 36:2) it can also have the added nuance of expecting something, or lying in wait. The derived noun, כֹתרת, appears in Tanakh in reference to the head of a pillar (so, for example, 1 Kings 7:16 and ...


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It is present in the Shilat ed. of Rambam's responsa (p. 673 IIRC), but R. Shilat demonstrates that this responsum is probably a forgery.


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The Rambam's responsum to Yoseph ben Gabir you're looking for begins on the 177th page of Qovetz Teshuvot ha-Rambam ve-Igrotav (Leipzig 1859). It's also available on Sefaria.


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Hebrew: Ibn Tibon, Schwartz, and Kapach: http://mobile.tora.ws/ Schwartz: http://press.tau.ac.il/perplexed/toc.asp Kapach: http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/mahshevt/more/shaar-2.htm English (Friedlander) http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/gfp/ If you're looking to pick a single one for Hebrew I would personally go with Kapach, but that's completely personal ...


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I believe that the opposite is true. In the Rambams litterateur דברי קבלה usually refers to the Torah Shebeal Pe (קיבלו במסורת) (although the Rambam view is that Halachot learned from נ''ך is in the status of Drabanan, so he might have referd to them as Divri Kabala as well) while כתבי קודש refers to Torah Shebechtav.


3

The Rambam mostly rejected the idea of demons. This resulted in him either completely ignoring הלכות mentioned in the גמרא that were based on the existence of demons (such as the issur of keeping food beneath your bed), or giving the הלכות different and more rational reasons (an example for such an halach is מעין שבע said on Friday nights, which was based on ...


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See שו"ת מהר"ם אלשקר סימן קיז on Hebrewbooks.org here.


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I found it here on Daat but would also like to see it in an original publication, e.g. on HebrewBooks.


2

It is noteworthy that Rambam himself acknowledges Geonic works among his sources in the introduction to the Sefer Hamitzvot where he lists "Mishna, Talmud, Sifra, Sifre, and Tosefta, and more than that, all decrees and ordinances of the later Geonim, of blessed memory, as well all that they have explained and commented upon concerning the the prohibited and ...


1

look at the introduction of the book "yam shel shlomo" on bava kama. there he says how one doesn't know where the rambam gets his information from, making it difficult to ask contradictions, for we don't know where he came from. part of it being the fact he never quotes.


3

A Geonic responsum (T'shuvos HaGeonim Shaarei Tzedek chelek 3 shaar 4 siman 20) cited by the Ritz Geius (Hil. Avel), the Ramban (Toras Haadam: Shaar Haavel; inyan hahaschala), the Ran (chiddushim to Moed Katan; dinei kvurah: aveilus uminhagim), and the Tur (YD 376) mentions a custom of washing ones hand after returning from a cemetery before entering ones ...


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As noted by @TamirEvan the Igros K'naos are part of the 1859 Leipzig ed. of Kovetz T'shuvos HaRambam. The quote from Radak can be found on page 3b there.


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The Chida in Shem Hagedolim cites this story from the עומר השכחה (c. 1500) where it was the Rif who blessed the young Rambam. The Chida explains that the Rif died well before the Rambam was born and replaces the Rif with the Ri Migash who died when the Rambam was seven years old. See page 148 on the bottom of left column here ...


4

Rav Yosef Yozel Horwitz the Alter of Novahrdok (1847–1919) already cites it in his talks compiled in the Sefer Madreigas Ha'adam in Darkei Habitachon (chapter 13 s.v Vezeh Lashon Harambam)


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It's generally understood that the Mishna Torah was Rambam's last -- and therefore greatest -- work. We assume that he changed his mind over time from his responsa-writing period to when he wrote the Yad HaChazaka (i.e. Mishna Torah). (Though much ink has been spilled about his responsum allowing conversion to Islam rather than death, vs. the Yad's ...


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R. David Yoef in the introduction to the P'er Hador edition of Rambam's responsa quotes many who value the MT over the responsa, including the Rashba, in addition to citing some who hold the opposite, such as the Radvaz.


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Modern Rambamist's also use it. These are non-Yeminite communities who have decided, usually as individuals, to follow Mishneh Torah almost exclusively, instead of later authorities like the Shulchan Aruch. I know of one such community in Beit Shemesh here in Israel, Ohel Moshe.


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Some highlights (you can glean this by simply reading Mishna Torah, but of course you have to compare it to a regular seder): Say a Bracha Achrona on the wine after every cup (at least according to this) Say a Bracha when washing before Karpas. Latter day practice has been to not say a bracha in deference to Tosfos opinion. Dip the Karpas in Charoses, not ...



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