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1

After some consideration, I think the straight forward answer for the Rambam is as follows. The Rambam holds that the purpose of the times of Moshiach is to do Mitzvos to merit Olam Haba. That works nicely for those who will live then, but what about those who lived before? With what will they merit Olam Haba? For that, the answer is Techiyas HaMeisim. ...


1

I'll say at the outset this answer will be a little interesting, as it is using Kabbalah to answer the Rambam, but it helps be Mekayim R. Weinberg's answer (although it doesn't quite agree with it, I don't think) and provide another approach to this question. The Tzemach Tzedek writes: הנה באלשיך פ' זו הביא משארז"ל בפ' בראשית שבעלילה בא הקב"ה על אדה"ר ...


0

I've heard other answers, but the simplest one I've heard is in a book by R' Matisyahu Solomon -- the Torah describes the Messianic era as "vehetivcha vehirbecha me'avosecha" -- "G-d will then make things better for you than he ever did for your ancestors." So if I believe it will be better, naturally, I look forward to it.


0

Of course how you answer this depends on how you view the purpose of the Ikkarim. Following the view that you attributed to the Chasam Sofer, Rabbi Yoel Kahn (in the series I referenced in the comments there, and summarized here (hat tip)) gives a simple metaphor. It would be like a soldier in a war not caring to win the war he is participating in. He can ...


2

An excerpt from Fundamentals and Faith (based on teachings of R' Yaakov Weinberg, written by Rabbi Mordechai Blumenfeld): It would seem, then, that "awaiting him" should be understood as attributing to him so much importance that one is aware of missing something, of lacking something every moment of one's life. It is not enough to know and believe in ...


1

perhaps by "eino mechake" the rambam does not mean simply "wait for" but rather that one does not "wait for him because he gave up hope of him ever coming" as the rambam continues שהרי תורה העידה עליו which implies he doesn't believe it will happen despite that the torah says so.


1

I guess the simplest answer to this question is that anyone who truly understand what the Messianic Era is like, according to the Torah and prophets, could not possibly want to continue living in the diaspora. The only possible explanation for why someone would rather live without Mashiach is that he doesn't actually believe (or understand) what Mashiach is ...


0

Here are definitions of Maaseh Bereishis and Maaseh Merkava according to the Gemara. According to Rashi in Chagiga 13a: מעשה המרכבה ומעשה בראשית. ברייתות הן Both Maaseh Bereishis and Maaseh Merkava are Braithot. It's clear from the Sugya there that they refer to things that were not supposed to be taught to students who had not reached a certain ...


1

The Rambam answers this question himself in his introduction. It basically boils down to three 'heterim' (reasons to permit): עת לעשות לה' הפרו תורתך - since many people had incorrect beliefs, it was time to explain certain necessary concepts of the Torah to avoid people believing in the wrong thing or thinking that the Torah is incompatible with correct ...


5

What you are quoting is an English translation of part of a testament that has been attributed to the Rambam (-some details). It is called שערי המוסר. A more literal translation is "Accustom yourselves to habitual goodness, for character is dependent upon habit, habit becoming as it were second nature."


4

In Hilchot Deot 1:2 "With regard to all the traits: a man has some from the beginning of his conception, in accordance with his bodily nature. Some are appropriate to a person's nature and will [therefore] be acquired more easily than other traits. Some traits he does not have from birth. He may have learned them from others, or turned to them on his own. ...


3

Menachem Kellner wrote a book on the topic, where he builds on work by Moshe Idel. Kellner takes for granted that Rambam rejected (what was taught as) kabbalah of his day, and his book 'shows' how much of the Rambam's writings were aimed at presenting an alternative to kabbalah. You could read his book as indirectly proving that the Rambam rejected kabbalah, ...


3

There's another way to approach this question. Consider the US constitution, l'havdil. We have not only the original document, and a record of all the debates during it's composition, but also extensive writings of each of those that participated in it's writing regarding exactly what they meant when they wrote it. Additionally we have a great body of ...


5

Hilchot Deot 1:7 How can one train himself to follow these temperaments to the extent that they become a permanent fixture of his [personality]? He should perform - repeat - and perform a third time - the acts which conform to the standards of the middle road temperaments. He should do this constantly, until these acts are easy for him and do ...


0

this is a mishna in Avoda Zarah 47b Shlosha batim hein, see also the mishna 41a Hamotzei Shivrei Tzlamim. one can assume that once they were destroyed the ovdei avoda zara were "mevatel" them.



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