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Read my (draft) article on the topic here, I quote extensively the opinions of those who had issues with this custom, including Ashkenazim. It seems that this opposition to the custom is not limited to Sepharadim. In fact, the Responsa mentioned in another post here from R' Yosef Messas lists many other sources too. The paper was originally based on that ...


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Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but... The Maharal in an exposition of Eruv Tavshilin describes the status of the 3 different tiers of days as paralleling the 3 different stages of human history. Chol, the regular work-week days, parallel olam hazeh, this world where we toil toward an ultimate reward. Shabbath, the day of rest, parallels olam ...


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The term Chag traditionally means "festival", where as "holiday" doesn't necessarily have a strict hebrew translation. Chagim in it's strictest sense refers to Passover, Shavous, and Sukkos (Rosh Hashanah as well as seen in Talmud Rosh Hashanah on Tehillim 81:3). Hannukah, Purim, Shabbos, etc. are not traditionally "chagim." I have even heard that ...


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In addition to the answers above, perhaps I can summarize things in terminology. As stated, the term "festival" or "holiday" doesn't translate well into a specific Hebrew word, when discussing the "important" days mentioned in the Torah. Let's view a key verse in the Torah that appears before the entire list of holidays. Focus on the bolded Hebrew terms ...


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It's hard to answer this question concretely because "festival" is an English word and Jewish concepts are not generally categorized by English words. But I will attempt to answer this question as well as I can. In my experience, with respect to Jewish observance, the word festival usually has one of two meanings. The first corresponds to the three ...


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I don't think there's a formal English terminology what people would call "festival" vs. "holiday", but there certainly are distinctions. The Jewish holidays such as Passover, Sukkot [booths], Rosh Hashanah (new year) and the like are spelled out in the Five Books of Moses. They all include "no-work" days. So you will not see an observant Jew at the office ...



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