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6

The Rema quotes the Rosh as saying to do it during the day. The Mishnah Berurah also says this, as does Rav Ovadia.


6

I don't think there's a formal English terminology what people would call "festival" vs. "holiday", but there certainly are distinctions. The Jewish holidays such as Passover, Sukkot [booths], Rosh Hashanah (new year) and the like are spelled out in the Five Books of Moses. They all include "no-work" days. So you will not see an observant Jew at the office ...


5

They do. You can see in the Karaite Jews of America website that they celebrate Purim on a similar date (though in Adar I in leap years).


4

The time for the mitzvah is tied to the se'udah which is held during the day. The Ran (Megilla 3b in the pages of the Rif) addresses the issue. Despite the fact that megilla reading varies, the se’udat Purim does not; it must be scheduled on the 14th or 15th (depending on whether the city is walled). Hence, the Ran claims, since mishloach manot is part ...


4

Given that this involves Jews, the correct answer is that it is a machlokes. There are those who say that it can be done as long as it is sent to arrive on Purim. , and there are those who say that it cannot be done. Another point is that sending to an organization that distributes on Purim is like making a shaliach to give it out for you. This is ...


4

I found the following from Rabbi Yom Tov Levinsky in Sefer Hamoadim. Although it is not a complete answer, it does mention the following. The Hamantaschen were originally known as "Mahn Taschen" due to the filling of poppy seeds. The Hebrew letters of מהן is the same as the letters of המן thus this type of pastry was especially beloved by the Jews. This is ...


3

Ohr Someyach answers: Dressing up on Purim is a long-standing custom; the earliest record is found in the writings of the Mahari Mintz , a late 15th century Italian Rabbi and scholar. He writes that on Purim it is permitted for a man to dress up as a woman and vice versa, and it is clearly implied that this is a custom that is well ...


3

The only "source" that I know for this custom is the Rema, Orach Chayim 696:8. He notes the phenomenon of wearing masks (פרצופים) on Purim, and the custom of men dressing up like women and women dressing up like men. His source for the foregoing is a teshuva by the Mahari Minz §17 (R' Yehuda Minz, 15th c.), which I haven't checked. Since the Rema notes that ...


3

The following is lightly adapted from an email I received from Cantor Sherwood Goffin: In 1950, Mr. Harry Coopersmith published his “Magnum Opus” – Songs We Sing – I believe in collaboration with the Bd. Of Jewish Educ. Of NY (I have to look at the title page). In it he has this Shoshanat Yaakov. He credits himself with using various “folk song sources” for ...


3

As far as when: Rambam, Laws of Megillah and Chanukah, 1:3. ומצוה לקרותה בלילה, וביום; וכל הלילה כשר לקריאת הלילה, וכל היום כשר לקריאת היום There is a mitzva to read it at both the night and the day. The entire night is appropriate for the night reading, and the entire day for the day reading. It's normally read in the evening after a Maariv ...


2

It's the other way around. Every date in the Jewish calendar has a particular nature, and gives that date the potential for particular things to happen on it. So the 14th Adar had always had the nature of being the holiest day of the year, it was just revealed when Purim happened. Rav Dessler speaks about this in Michtav HaEliyahu (sorry, don't have an exact ...


2

It's a safek if one is yotzei like this or not. It's best to be machmir and send more to a different person. Mikra'ei Kodesh - Hilchot Purim by Rabbi Moshe Harari, 12:24. המזמין את חברו לסעוד אצלו ביום פורים, ספק אם יצא בכך ידי חובת משלוח מנות. וטוב להחמיר ולשלוח מנה נוספת במקום מנה זו. He cites the Kaf Hachayim (OC 695:42) for this. The Kaf Hachayim ...


2

Drinking helps. I know a good number of women who also drink and enjoy the raised spirits. As to childcare or care for the home - why is this only the responsibility of a woman? Am I no longer a father because I have a drink? Both parents need to be aware of the children, safety, elderly, pets, breakables, etc. I also know women who, out of concern for ...


2

Qiẓur Shulḥan 'Arukh - Yalqut Yosef (Oraḥ Ḥayim 692:13-14) states (my translation): אסור לאכול קודם קריאת המגילה, ואין חילוק בזה בין קריאת המגילה של לילה לקריאת המגילה של יום [סי' תרצב ס''ד ומשנ''ב שם]... ומכל מקום מותר לטעום פירות קודם קריאתה, וכן פחות מכביצה פת או עוגה, ולשתות תה או קפה. והמחמיר שלא לטעום כלום תבוא עליו ברכה... It is forbidden to ...


2

In terms of the Oleh, the Magen Avraham (OC 566 sk 2) writes that reader needs to repeat these lines aloud after the congregation says them because the congregation only said them "Derekh Bakkasha" by way of supplication, not as part of the reading of the Torah. The Elyah Rabbah (ibid.) and the Mishna Berura (ibid. sk 3) in their presentations makes clear ...


2

It appears from this site that the answer is no, one is not yotzei (CYLOR, of course). In the course of the discussion there was brought up the idea of "if someone missed words can he say them from his own printed book" and to support this, someone said, "I heard otherwise from one of the biggest poskim in Yerushalayim. He said that if one misses a few ...


2

It's hard to answer this question concretely because "festival" is an English word and Jewish concepts are not generally categorized by English words. But I will attempt to answer this question as well as I can. In my experience, with respect to Jewish observance, the word festival usually has one of two meanings. The first corresponds to the three ...


2

I understand the concept now. A few ideas soufganyot - there is a doubt whether they are mezonot or hamotzi. Because it is fried challah-dough, there is a machloket whether the frying removes the hamotzi. Some are machmir not to eat without hamotzi chocolate-covered raisins or nuts - until you open/eat one, you don't know what bracha - and even then it ...


2

I assume you are asking about the health risk that smoking causes. In general, and as documented here on MY, regular smoking is forbidden. However smoking once a year is a different story as it is like many other low-risk activities that one engages in, e.g., driving for recreational purposes or some more dangerous sports. As I documented at length here, ...


2

According to this website, a woman is required to fast unless she doesn't feel well enough to do so Many authorities, including the Kaf Ha’haim (based on the Bah), the Elya Rabba, the Kisur Shulhan Aruch, Hacham Bension Abba Shaul, Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach and Rabbi Mazuz, ruled that the status of a woman during this period vis-à-vis Ta’anit Ester ...


2

If necessary, the Chayei Adam says you can give before Purim as long as it will be enjoyed on Purim. Alternatively, if you wake up on Purim and can't find any poor people that day, you can set aside money on Purim to be given later. So you'd still get some mitzva if you set up a transfer on your Purim irregardless of the recipients' situation. (Whether ...


2

It's hard to prove a negative, but I've never heard of what you describe, and I'm somewhat familiar with the Reform community. (I see you tagged your question reform-judaism.) There is a tradition on the day of Purim to do some silly things, usually at the festive meal (held in the home), but also there are purimshpiels in synagogues sometimes -- dramatic, ...


2

Seder Olam, 29 seems to present a reason when states that they were the ones who had written accusations against the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem in Ezra 4:6.


2

As per this website, the obligation is to read/hear the megillah twice, once in the evening and once in the day. One cannot fulfill the obligation via an electronic medium, as per this.


2

The answer to your first question is yes, one must hear the megillah (read live) both in the evening (after ma'ariv0 and during the day (usually after shacharis - but any time). A number of people point out that it should be done before fulfilling the other mitzvos of the day. Matanot l'Evyonim - Gifts to the Poor These gifts should be given by day. It ...


1

I'm afraid I have no source for this, but my reading of Esther 8:1 is that she revealed to Achashverosh only that Mordechai was her uncle, and did not tell him that he was also her husband.


1

UPDATE I removed the reference to the haftarah as it is not analogous to the megillah. However that discussion is found at Reading the Haftorah From Printed Materials However, I have found references that speak of the other for megillos Megillas Esther has the requirements of reading from a klaf as part of the mitzvah and one would not fulfill the mitzvah ...


1

Noda B'Yehuda 41 - page 44 - column starting with Vnashiv says that they should make Kiddush Levana first for two reasons. One is tadir. The other is that the Megila can always be done later, however Kiddush Levana there is a risk of it getting cloudy.


1

First, it was examined whether to give Matanoth Laevionim before Purim Magen Avraham (O.C. 694 saif koton 1) says in name of the Maor not to give before purim because you need to make sure they do not eat the manoth before Purim. (This is about Matanoth Laevionim). In the case of Mishloach Manoth It is the same for Mishloach Manoth (S.A. O.C. 695, 4, Rema ...


1

Magen Avraham 690:6 implies very strongly that one cannot fulfil his obligation by hearing the m'gila from a printed book. He's commenting on the Shulchan Aruch, which says: Someone holding in hand a m'gila that is not valid should not read with the designated [reader] but be quiet and listen. Magen Avraham comments (in part, citing Bes Yosef): ...



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