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9

ABSOLUTELY. DO NOT DRINK IF IT IS MEDICALLY CONTRAINDICATED!! NEVER EVER EVER!! Immediately after the statement about "obligation to drink on Purim", the Gemara tells a tale of one rabbi who got drunk and very nearly killed someone. Most rabbis say that's just a cautionary note to moderate your drinking, but the Baal HaMaor says the Gemara is refuting the ...


7

The gemara in Megillah 6b-7a explains why when it investigates the Mishnaic statement that in a leap year, one is required to read the megillah in the second Adar to be yotzei the requirement. (as per dafyomi.co.il) R. Eliezer says, every year we celebrate in the month next to Shevat. R. Shimon says, every year we celebrate in the month adjacent to Nisan. ...


6

Rav Shmuel Kamenetsky in Kovetz Halchos pg 129 writes that a woman is obligated to drink a rivies of wine on Purim,and she can fulfill this obligation with grape juice(see footnote231). In footnote 230 he holds that since women are obligated in all the mitzvos if the day they are also obligated in drinking a little wine,but to drink alot of wine is an issur ...


6

The issue is discussed in the נזר התורה journal of Adar 5767, and in responses thereof. Among the sources cited by the author are the following: I. Responsum in Yizchak Burstein's מטעמי יצחק. There, R' Burstein cites Chulin 44b: Whenever R. Zera was sent a gift he would not accept it but whenever he was invited out to dine he would go, for he used ...


5

Although the word זנב does sometimes mean a tail, it is actually a generic word. This is how the ספר הערוך defines it: כל דבר שהוא יתר שאינו כמדת חברו משתנה מכמות שהוא ממה שהעולם נוהג קרוי זנב - anything which is extra or which is not the same size as the adjoining one or which is different from what is usual elsewhere, is called a זנב. Therefore a suitable ...


4

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger writes that a miracle which breaks the laws of nature (a revealed miracle) is greater than a miracle that takes place within the laws of nature (a hidden miracle). The miracle of Chanukah was of the first type, and therefore we publicize it greatly for all the world to see. But the miracle of Purim was clothed in the laws of nature, and ...


4

I think the most succinct words of wisdom on this subject are from Kitzur Shulchan Aruch: However, one who has a weak constitution, and also one who knows himself, that by this (excessive drinking) he would treat lightly, Heaven forbid, some commandment, a blessing, or a prayer, or will come, Heaven forbid, to irreverence, it is best (for him) not to get ...


4

It literally means "a joyful Purim". The words "I wish you" that should accompany it are missing but if you want to say it in proper English then "I wish you a joyful Purim" would do the job. Google Translate has "A happy Purim". Maybe you need to cast lots to decide which to use. (Purim means "lots").


3

The Rama 690:17 brings the Avduraham who brings the minhag(a minhag one should not make fun of) of banging during the megillah which initially started outside of reading the megillah(little children writing hamans name on a shoe and stomping). The Ben Ish Chai hilchos purim 10 brings the Yaavetz who quotes the minhag of his father to bang by Haman,but the ...


3

The short answer: Get ready for Purim, by learning about why Purim is a joyous day and start internalizing those happy lessons. I already wrote here, about 2 reasons why we increase joy in Adar - as a preparation for Purim. To recap: According to the Michtav M'Eliyahu (Vol. 2 pg 125) the happiness we feel on Purim is a הכרת הטוב - recognizing the ...


3

I went looking for instances of "hamentash" (המן־טאַש) in Sholom Aleichem stories because I wanted to see it used in a sentence as singular and plural. In the story "Two Shalachmones or A Purim Scandal" the word is used 12 times, but every single usage is singular. It is consistently spelled המן־טאַש or "hamentash". You can find the first instance on page ...


3

The statement is made in what appears to be an addendum to the 6th letter printed at the end of Ateres Tzvi (the Zitishover's commentary on the Zohar). He makes two similar statements equating drinking on Purim to fasting for 6 days. He does not source the idea but compares it to the fasting of Mar b'rei d'Ravina (of which I am unfamiliar).


3

The Maharal in his commentary to Megillas Esther says that Esther only fasted for 70 hours (as opposed to 3 full days, 72 hours), and she actually broke her fast before going to Achashverosh to prepare herself for meeting the king. This is hinted in the verse "גַּם-אֲנִי וְנַעֲרֹתַי, אָצוּם כֵּן; וּבְכֵן אָבוֹא אֶל-הַמֶּלֶךְ" (Esther 4:17) "we will fast כן ...


3

You may find this answer interesting (from Rabbi Moshe Bogomilsky, paraphrazing a Sicha from the Lubavitcher Rebbe): Whenever a Jew is thankful about his physical survival, he does not have to communicate it to non-Jews, since physical self-survival is a common instinct among all humans and animals, and it is understood that Jews will fight for their ...


3

After some research I found: Rav Eliyashiv in Ashrei Ha'Ish pg 311:5 is quoted as holding that one can be yotzeh the mitzvah of shaloch manos with two different types of drinks and that soft drinks with flavor counts but seltzer does not count since it does not have a din of a drink(I would assume water is not good as well). Rav Shmuel Kamenetsky in Kovetz ...


3

Likutei Sichos - Lubavitcher Rabbi Zatzal says that one is Yotzei Mishloach Manos with a piece of cake and soda. However regarding water I have so far been unable to find a source that either permits it or prohibits it.


2

According to Rabbi Efrayim Greenblat (a student of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein), in his work Rivevot Efrayim, it is inappropriate for a woman to drink intoxicating beverages, even on Purim. Source: Rivevot Efrayim (1:458), taken from http://www.dailyhalacha.com/Display.asp?PageIndex=&ClipID=1596


2

Sefer Segulas Yisrael 80:3 is the source you are looking for.


2

When I went to Eretz Yisrael (in 5727), I was told (by Rabbi Besdin Z'tzl of YU) that it depends on where you normally live. If you are living in Yerushalayim and happen to be elsewhere, then you should (if you can) return to Yerushalayim for Shushan Purim. However, you can attend the megilla reading where you happen to be especially if you are not sure that ...


2

My understanding (which I'm half certain I saw in a sefer many moons ago) is that just as when one receives an important letter, one reads it avidly all the way through without pausing, so too should the Megillah be read. Therefore, it should be read without pausing unnecessarily. The reason for unfolding it before the reading is because the Megillah has to ...


2

According to the Ezras Torah Luach, 5774 Edition, pp. 101-102: Rav Henkin noted that the Reading of the Megillah, both at night as well as in the morning, is an obligation incumbent upon every man and woman. Therefore, the reader must have a powerful voice that can be heard by everyone. He must read very precisely, without swallowing any ...


1

I was told by a Chabad rabbi in Jerusalem that the custom is to say "shechiyanu" if this is the case, since Purim and Shushan Purim are actually different holidays. I think there's probably room to do it either way, though, since obviously the halakhic principle of "no blessing in case of a doubt" applies here as well.


1

The Chabad custom is to stomp feet instead of making noise with one's voice and/or noisemakers. In my experience, this makes it easier to hear the recitation. I'm not sure if that is the reason for the custom, or where the custom originates.


1

A Grammen is a kind of song Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! The tune is simple so you can sing a long Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! It doesn't really matter if you put too many syllables into a line Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! You can put in a billion and it will still be fine! Da Na Da Na Da Na Na!


1

Ein Simcha Ela K'Simchas haTorah!


1

The Ben Ish Chai Writes in Tetzaveh Hilchos Purim 3: אות ג קראה מתנמנם הואיל ולא נרדם בשינה יצא אבל השומע אם מתנמנם לא יצא וצריך להזהר בד"ז שהוא מצוי תמיד דאלו השומעים יתנמנמו, ולכתחילה אם ראו את הקורא שקרא איזה פסוקים מתנמנם מכריחין אותתו שיחזור ויקראנה, דלא אמרינן קראה מתנמנם יצא אלא בדיעבד היכא דסיים קריאת המגילה כולה: If one is dozing off while hearing ...


1

Not surprisingly, it is a Machlokes.. See http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/lets-dress-up.html The earliest source (14th Century) permitting it was the Even Bochan. The Rema paskens lekula - allowing it.



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