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10

I have found that at Purim meals where no one gets seriously drunk, everyone tends to have an equivalently-good time. How good a time that is, of course, depends on the quality of the company, conversation, etc., just like at any other gathering. If you're looking for a great source of both holy and fun holiday-appropriate conversation-starters, I recommend ...


9

The Medrash records a machloket Tannaim about whether in the future all the moadim are batel except for Yom Kippur and Purim or all the moadim except for Purim. The Maharal writes in his hakdama to Ohr Chadash, his commentary on Megillat Esther, that on both days the Jewish people were/are opposed by a force that seeks their complete destruction - Yom Kippur ...


7

At the 2014 International Bible Contest for Adults (חידון התנ"ך הבינלאומי למבוגרים תשע"ה) televised finals1, celebrated grammarian2 Dr. Avshalom Kor (אבשלום קור) posed this question among a series of short vignettes about "Ma'oz Tzur" that he presented while the next contestant was getting into place. He answered that the 'ו' preceding "his possessions" is ...


7

There are several places in the Talmud which assume she was taken by force, e.g. Megillah 15a: לך כנוס את כל היהודים וגו' עד אשר לא כדת אמר רבי אבא שלא כדת היה שבכל יום ויום עד עכשיו באונס ועכשיו ברצון וכאשר אבדתי אבדתי כשם שאבדתי מבית אבא כך אובד ממך Rashi there: עד עכשיו. נבעלתי באונס: ועכשיו. מכאן ואילך מדעתי: אבדתי ממך. ואסורה אני לך דאשת ישראל ...


5

My mother likes going to a women's megillah reading, where women read for women. She says going, especially reading, gives her a feeling of being more involved on Purim.


5

I don't know for sure, but the following piyut seems like a good candidate, printed in the Machzor Vitri for Shachris of Purim: אָרוּר הָמָן אֲשֶׁר בִּיקֵּשׁ לְאַבְּדִי בָּרוּךְ מָרְדֳּכַי הַיְּהוּדִי אֲרוּרָה זֶרֶשׁ אֵשֶׁת מַפְחִידִי בְּרוּכָה אֶסְתֵּר בַּעֲדִי אָרוּר הָמָן אָץ לְנַפְּצִי בָּרוּךְ מָרְדֳּכַי בִּתְחִינָה ...


5

Esther 2:8 uses the term "Vatilakach" - she was taken. While it doesn't clearly imply "forcibly", there are several hints that this was mandatory. One is 2:3 that says that the king should gather EVERY virgin girl. The text alone doesn't state that Esther was married, so she might have been a betulah. Even if we follow the explanations that she was ...


5

The Mishna Brurah (688:12) says: בן עיר שהלך לכרך אם היה דעתו בעת נסיעתו לחזור למקומו בזמן קריאה ר"ל בזמן קריתה של ט"ו דהיינו משהאיר היום לא יהיה שם כי יחזור משם קודם אור היום אף שלבסוף רואה שהוא מוכרח להתעכב שם גם על יום ט"ו מ"מ אינו נקרא בשם מוקף וקורא ביום י"ד בהיותו בכרך A non-walled city dweller who travels to a walled city: if he intended when he ...


4

The Maharal in his commentary to Megillas Esther says that Esther only fasted for 70 hours (as opposed to 3 full days, 72 hours), and she actually broke her fast before going to Achashverosh to prepare herself for meeting the king. This is hinted in the verse "גַּם-אֲנִי וְנַעֲרֹתַי, אָצוּם כֵּן; וּבְכֵן אָבוֹא אֶל-הַמֶּלֶךְ" (Esther 4:17) "we will fast כן ...


4

The non-junk-food items I've most appreciated getting, and that aren't burdensome to prepare or store, include: Durable fresh fruit: apples, oranges, bananas, etc. Berries and other fragile fruits are nice if you can keep them from getting squished during delivery, but that's more work. Dried fruits: raisins, figs, dates, plums, mango, etc. Raisins can be ...


4

The Gemara derives via drasha an obligation to read zachor. Accordingly they must have said it even before Purim. They specifically started saying it before Purim sometime before the time of the Mishnah, for the mishna in Megillah (29a) says that we say it specifically before purim. The reason for this is to combine the themes of destruction of Amalek ...


4

It literally means "a joyful Purim". The words "I wish you" that should accompany it are missing but if you want to say it in proper English then "I wish you a joyful Purim" would do the job. Google Translate has "A happy Purim". Maybe you need to cast lots to decide which to use. (Purim means "lots").


4

According to Derech Eress, a book on the customs of Aleppo,the Jews used to celebrate 2 days of Purim out of Safek. ולכן נהגו לעשות פורים שני ימים, אלא שקוראים את המגילה בלי ברכה: וכן היה מנהג ארם צובה מימי קדם, שנהגו כל דיני פורים בשני הימים (וגם קראו בתורה בברכה - ורק על המגילה (לא בירכו, כאמור). מנהג זה המשיך אצל המוסתערבים (התושבים ...


4

I guess a generation raised on candy prefers sweeter fillings that don't get stuck in your teeth. :D Personally, I have no problems finding Mohn hamentaschen down here in Baltimore - they are just as common as any other flavor. Though I guess that was the change - they used to be the MOST common flavor, until people realized that ...


3

The Rama 690:17 brings the Avduraham who brings the minhag(a minhag one should not make fun of) of banging during the megillah which initially started outside of reading the megillah(little children writing hamans name on a shoe and stomping). The Ben Ish Chai hilchos purim 10 brings the Yaavetz who quotes the minhag of his father to bang by Haman,but the ...


3

I went looking for instances of "hamentash" (המן־טאַש) in Sholom Aleichem stories because I wanted to see it used in a sentence as singular and plural. In the story "Two Shalachmones or A Purim Scandal" the word is used 12 times, but every single usage is singular. It is consistently spelled המן־טאַש or "hamentash". You can find the first instance on page ...


3

I heard from the Rivevos Ephrayim's uncle R. Nota Greenblatt Shlita that perhaps women are pattur from mitzvos on Purim as mitzvos assei shehazman grama, except for Megilla which is zecher lanes and they were also involved in the nes. It is possible that the s'udah which is likely for simcha is not included. Drinking would seem to be a part of the Seudah ...


3

According to Rabbi Efrayim Greenblat (a student of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein), in his work Rivevot Efrayim, it is inappropriate for a woman to drink intoxicating beverages, even on Purim. Source: Rivevot Efrayim (1:458), taken from http://www.dailyhalacha.com/Display.asp?PageIndex=&ClipID=1596


3

Get drunk enough that you are not mentally competent enough to be included in the command to drink. Ad d'lo yada is the point at which you are in a temporary state of being exempt from the mitzvah because you are drunk. If you sober up, get right back in there, buddy! (Emek Beracha quoting R' Yisrael Salanter)


3

Rashi, Nemukey Yosef, Riaz, Rokeach, Rambam, and many others all write wine. THis presents mystery; if one or two said it it might be coincidental, but with so many you'd think thered be an explanation. My explanation is that these Rishonim understood that "bsumei" means to get drunk through wine. THere is much support for this assertion: Rashi generaly ...


3

there seems to be a fundamental machlokes in how to understand what the gemara means when it says " reading the megilla is like saying hallel". the meiri understands it fulfills it, so if one is in a place with no megilla, they then should say hallel. however the Rambam ( megilla- chanuka perek 3 ) says " hallel wasnt instituted on purim because of megilla " ...


3

As a man, I can only tell you what my wife tells me she enjoys about Purim. My wife enjoys dressing our kids up in costumes that sometimes match a theme with our Shaloch Manos and sometimes are just cute, and then showing them off. When I was single, I did not get drunk on Purim - I followed the opinion of the Rema, to drink more than my usual (which was ...


3

This link is of a Chazan in Khal Adas Yeshurun Jerusalem singing a Birchas Nisim in honor of Purim Frankfurt. This is from 5767/2007.


3

He fulfills the obligation by going to sleep and actively entering a state of not knowing.


3

Although many sources prohibit intoxication (Ramban Comm. to Kedoshim, Rambam Hil. Deos, Meoros Megillah 7b, Kol Bo and Orchos Chaim cited by Darchei Moshe and Beis Yosef respectively in Orach Chaim 695) some sources write hat one may or should get drunk on purim: 1) There is an obligation to get drunk (Rif to Megillah 7b, Piskei Rid, Piskei Riaz, and ...


3

The Emek Beracha quotes from R' Yisroel Salanter that he held that this was an indication that the Rambam held the mitzvah is to be drunk, not to get drunk. The Rambam held that getting drunk is not an accomplishment that you complete and then are done, but is a continual process throughout the day, and therefore if you sober up, you keep drinking.


2

Last year, my community had a program where people would send things that are actually able to be used for the se'udah, with assigned people to give to. We received fresh-baked pitot, much appreciated. (We got them early in the morning, and had nothing for breakfast yet. They didn't last until the se'udah. ;)) We gave a lasagna, also appreciated by the ...


2

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba ...


2

No it is assur, for through trying to come up with shtus you will inevitably run through actual Torah in your mind. This is so even if you wanted to, for whatever reason, read kefira in the bathroom which of course technically has no kedusha



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