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9

The Medrash records a machloket Tannaim about whether in the future all the moadim are batel except for Yom Kippur and Purim or all the moadim except for Purim. The Maharal writes in his hakdama to Ohr Chadash, his commentary on Megillat Esther, that on both days the Jewish people were/are opposed by a force that seeks their complete destruction - Yom Kippur ...


7

A person fulfills his obligation by hearing the megillah read in the original Hebrew even if he does not understand the meaning of the words (Shulchan Aruch OC 690:8). In fact, even the rabbis of the Talmud were not certain of the translation of some words in Esther 8:10 (see M'gilla 18a, Mishna B'rura 690:26).


7

There are several places in the Talmud which assume she was taken by force, e.g. Megillah 15a: לך כנוס את כל היהודים וגו' עד אשר לא כדת אמר רבי אבא שלא כדת היה שבכל יום ויום עד עכשיו באונס ועכשיו ברצון וכאשר אבדתי אבדתי כשם שאבדתי מבית אבא כך אובד ממך Rashi there: עד עכשיו. נבעלתי באונס: ועכשיו. מכאן ואילך מדעתי: אבדתי ממך. ואסורה אני לך דאשת ישראל ...


7

Medrash Esther Raba 3 says Charvona was called Charvona as he was responsible for the Churban Bais Hamikdash. חרבונא מופיע פעמיים במגילה - בתחילת המגילה הוא מופיע כאחד משבעת הסריסים המשרתים את פני המלך אחשרוש, ובסוף המגילה הוא מגלה לאחשורוש על העץ שהכין המן. חרבונא זהו שם פרסי (א' בסופו). אומר המדרש [אסתר רבה, ג] שמשמעות שמו - "אחריב ביתיה", לשון ...


5

The Mishna Brurah (688:12) says: בן עיר שהלך לכרך אם היה דעתו בעת נסיעתו לחזור למקומו בזמן קריאה ר"ל בזמן קריתה של ט"ו דהיינו משהאיר היום לא יהיה שם כי יחזור משם קודם אור היום אף שלבסוף רואה שהוא מוכרח להתעכב שם גם על יום ט"ו מ"מ אינו נקרא בשם מוקף וקורא ביום י"ד בהיותו בכרך A non-walled city dweller who travels to a walled city: if he intended when he ...


5

Esther 2:8 uses the term "Vatilakach" - she was taken. While it doesn't clearly imply "forcibly", there are several hints that this was mandatory. One is 2:3 that says that the king should gather EVERY virgin girl. The text alone doesn't state that Esther was married, so she might have been a betulah. Even if we follow the explanations that she was ...


4

According to Derech Eress, a book on the customs of Aleppo,the Jews used to celebrate 2 days of Purim out of Safek. ולכן נהגו לעשות פורים שני ימים, אלא שקוראים את המגילה בלי ברכה: וכן היה מנהג ארם צובה מימי קדם, שנהגו כל דיני פורים בשני הימים (וגם קראו בתורה בברכה - ורק על המגילה (לא בירכו, כאמור). מנהג זה המשיך אצל המוסתערבים (התושבים ...


4

I guess a generation raised on candy prefers sweeter fillings that don't get stuck in your teeth. :D Personally, I have no problems finding Mohn hamentaschen down here in Baltimore - they are just as common as any other flavor. Though I guess that was the change - they used to be the MOST common flavor, until people realized that ...


4

The Gemara derives via drasha an obligation to read zachor. Accordingly they must have said it even before Purim. They specifically started saying it before Purim sometime before the time of the Mishnah, for the mishna in Megillah (29a) says that we say it specifically before purim. The reason for this is to combine the themes of destruction of Amalek ...


3

He fulfills the obligation by going to sleep and actively entering a state of not knowing.


3

Get drunk enough that you are not mentally competent enough to be included in the command to drink. Ad d'lo yada is the point at which you are in a temporary state of being exempt from the mitzvah because you are drunk. If you sober up, get right back in there, buddy! (Emek Beracha quoting R' Yisrael Salanter)


3

The Emek Beracha quotes from R' Yisroel Salanter that he held that this was an indication that the Rambam held the mitzvah is to be drunk, not to get drunk. The Rambam held that getting drunk is not an accomplishment that you complete and then are done, but is a continual process throughout the day, and therefore if you sober up, you keep drinking.


3

Although many sources prohibit intoxication (Ramban Comm. to Kedoshim, Rambam Hil. Deos, Meoros Megillah 7b, Kol Bo and Orchos Chaim cited by Darchei Moshe and Beis Yosef respectively in Orach Chaim 695) some sources write hat one may or should get drunk on purim: 1) There is an obligation to get drunk (Rif to Megillah 7b, Piskei Rid, Piskei Riaz, and ...


3

there seems to be a fundamental machlokes in how to understand what the gemara means when it says " reading the megilla is like saying hallel". the meiri understands it fulfills it, so if one is in a place with no megilla, they then should say hallel. however the Rambam ( megilla- chanuka perek 3 ) says " hallel wasnt instituted on purim because of megilla " ...


2

The Halacha is very clear about this. For example, the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן קמא - הלכות מגלה says: הַקוֹרֵא אֶת הַמְּגִלָּה, צָרִיךְ לְכַוֵּן לְהוֹצִיא אֶת כָּל הַשּׁוֹמְעִים. וְגַם הַשּׁוֹמֵעַ צָרִיךְ לְכַוֵּן לָצֵאת וְלִשְׁמֹעַ כָּל תֵּבָה וְתֵבָה, שֶׁאֲפִלּו אִם רַק תֵּבָה אַחַת לֹא שָׁמַע, אֵינוֹ יוֹצֵא. וְלָכֵן צָרִיךְ הַקּוֹרֵא ...


2

Additional answers: 1) No obligation but just a good thing: (Raavya; vol. 2 ch. 564, Hagahos Mainonis; Hil. Purim 2:15, Maharil; responsum 56 citing Maharash, in turn cited by Darchei Moshe, and other acharonim). 2) It is merely an exaggerated expression (Meoros to Megillah 7b).


2

No it is assur, for through trying to come up with shtus you will inevitably run through actual Torah in your mind. This is so even if you wanted to, for whatever reason, read kefira in the bathroom which of course technically has no kedusha


2

This article from Yivo seems pretty thorough. Excerpts: Various sources, particularly the Talmud (BT Meg. 7a–b, 9a; Sanh. 64b), mention entertainment at such celebrations associated with the reading of the Scroll of Esther, including pantomimes, parodies of liturgical texts, the custom of the carnival rabbi (Purim rov), and plays performed in the ...


2

Kalonymus ben Kalonymus (13th-14th century) authored such a work entitled Masseket Purim, a parody for the Feast of Purim. (I think) I believe Immanuel the Roman (13th-14th century) authored a work of this genre as well entitled Makhberet Imanuel


2

During a shiur about Purim the rav (who is a musmach of Ner Yisrael and gives a chaburah there) mentioned that all the halachos of Purim follow the halachos of listening to the megillah as far as the location difference. Thus, someone who is in the United States for Purim will have the seudah on the 14th, even if he is from Yerushalayim. Similarly if he is ...


2

If you notice passuk 9:22 is slightly changed and mentions that it turned from mourning to a good day,but the establishment for the future is only mishteh and simcha. Megillah daf 5b the gemara explains that hesped and taanis they accepted no to perform but to refrain from melacha they did not accept based off the two pessukim you mention and the discrepancy ...


2

It seems to me that the issue was to uproot any supporters of Haman left in Shushan, especially within the government\palace. This is why she had Haman's son's hanged, and the people killed were probably affiliated with Haman's family. The purpose was to solidify Mordechai's position and to make sure the Jews would be secure for years to come.


2

I don't agree with the premise of the question: "...the Megilat Esther says the Jews of the city of Shushan (the capital) needed/took an extra day to fight for their survival. " Initially, after Haman was killed, permission was granted for the Jews to defend themselves on the 13th Adar - and to kill their enemies. For some reason, Esther asked for ...


1

This question has to do with the dispute over "ve'al hannisim" or "al hannisim." The Mishnah Brurah (תרעב) writes that one should be careful to recite "ve'al" whereas the Shulchan Aruch quotes a minority opinion that "some sefarim have the nusach of 'al hannisim'", including the Rambam in Sefer Ahavah. This debate was sparked by two separate sources, one ...


1

The following answer was given by Ohr Sameach, "Ask the Rabbi". It gives three reasons as to why Mordechai did not bow. The third reason is an interesting take on the matter. It basically says that the king himself had exempted Mordechai from the command to bow. It explains why Haman had to come up with a totally different reason for killing the Jews. Had ...


1

Mordechai was a major figure for the Jews. His refusal to bow down took place in public. Let's presume that, as Rashi writes, he did not bow down to Haman because Haman wore/became an Avoda Zara. Both bowing to an idol and doing any sin in public (Chillul Hashem) are sins for which one must put oneself in danger rather than transgress. A Jew is forbidden to ...


1

The Shulchan Arukh (in O'C 692:1) writes: ולאחריה נוהגין לברך: הרב את ריבנו וכו. After [reading the megillah] it is the customary to say the blessing harav et riveinu etc. The Mishnah Berura (#4) comments there: כי בגמרא איתא דברכה דלאחריה תליא במנהגא במקום שנוהגים לברך יברך ולכן כתב המחבר דהאידנא נוהגים לברך This is because the Gemara ...


1

This is derived on Megillah 2b via biblical exegesis. The Yerushalmi quoted by Rambam and others explains that this was to accord honor to Israel whose walled cities were destroyed in the time of the Megilla. By defining walled city status by the ealier periof of Yehshua, Israeli cities qualified. (The exact intent of the Yerushalmi is disputed by the ...



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