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I don't think there's a formal English terminology what people would call "festival" vs. "holiday", but there certainly are distinctions. The Jewish holidays such as Passover, Sukkot [booths], Rosh Hashanah (new year) and the like are spelled out in the Five Books of Moses. They all include "no-work" days. So you will not see an observant Jew at the office ...


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It's hard to answer this question concretely because "festival" is an English word and Jewish concepts are not generally categorized by English words. But I will attempt to answer this question as well as I can. In my experience, with respect to Jewish observance, the word festival usually has one of two meanings. The first corresponds to the three ...


1

The term Chag traditionally means "festival", where as "holiday" doesn't necessarily have a strict hebrew translation. Chagim in it's strictest sense refers to Passover, Shavous, and Sukkos (Rosh Hashanah as well as seen in Talmud Rosh Hashanah on Tehillim 81:3). Hannukah, Purim, Shabbos, etc. are not traditionally "chagim." I have even heard that ...


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In addition to the answers above, perhaps I can summarize things in terminology. As stated, the term "festival" or "holiday" doesn't translate well into a specific Hebrew word, when discussing the "important" days mentioned in the Torah. Let's view a key verse in the Torah that appears before the entire list of holidays. Focus on the bolded Hebrew terms ...



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