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1

I assume that you know that it is allowed to bless in any language and you ask for the meaning of each one of the criteria. You ask for blessing pattern. 1. for need to say Ata, 2. to say Name, 3. and to say Kingdom. In Gemara and poskim, we see that the precise words are not the point. We can find 3 rules in Talmud: (1) To change a blessing from the ...


2

See the English Translation, p 49 of the Gemara that you quote ‘On the third of Tishri the mention [of God] in bonds was abolished: for the Grecian Government had forbidden the mention of God's name (26) by the Israelites, and when the Government of the Hasmoneans became strong and defeated them, they ordained that they should mention the name ...


3

The Mishnah in Sanhedrin 10 (1) lists those who have no share in the World to Come. Included in these according to Abba Shaul is someone who utters the Divine Name as it is spelled. See Rambam's commentary on the mishnah where he says, And [likewise], one who pronounces the name [of God] with its letters, yod, hay vav, hay - which is the explicit ...


0

I understand the question to be (1) why the Rishonim were so interested in studying philosophy and (2) why don't we do the same today. The reason for (1) is because there is much wisdom in Greek Philosophy. The Rishonim such as the Rambam were not so interested in Greek philosophy but rather in sifting the truth from the falsehood in it. The benefit in ...


-1

This question asks about shifting attitudes over many centuries, and is somewhat open ended, so I will begin with general historical overview: The vast majority of philosophy and non-Talmudic study was by the Geonim and their intellectual successors, North African and Southern Spanish rishonim (such as Rabbenu Chanael b. Chushiel of Tunisia, and Rambam of ...



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