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8

The Zohar (Bamidbar 138a and 187b) points out that this repetition is further unique in that the two "Moshe"s are not separated by a pesik (vertical line), unlike other repeated names in Tanach ["Avraham | Avraham" (Gen. 22:11), "Yaakov | Yaakov" (ibid. 46:2), "Shmuel | Shmuel" (I Sam. 3:10)]. This, says the Zohar, was because Moshe was perfect from birth ...


8

Rashi (Breshit 22:11) Calling the name twice is a sign of love.


7

According to Abarbanel, the several prophecies in Chapters 29-32 of Ezekiel are all concerning the future of Egypt (the future from Ezekiel's perspective), but they will not all happen at the same time. The first prophecies were realized during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar and his conquering Egypt, and the later prophecies will be realized before the coming ...


5

You can see Rashi's commentary to the chapter in English here. Joshua was being accused because his sons had married to gentile women and he did not interfere. This was symbolized by the filthy garments which were then removed and replaced with clean ones, alluding that his sons should separate from their wives, and he would be forgiven and the sins would be ...


5

I suggest you read the end of this article by R' Yisroel Blumenthal. The content is intended to be anti-missionary, but nonetheless gives the interpretation of Jewish commentators. (Note that rarely is there actual consensus among Jewish commentators to the Bible, especially with interpretations of vague visions such as this one, but in this case the one ...


5

There is a tradition that these three people had asked Ezekiel whether they would be saved, and he responded in the negative. The story is referred to in Zohar Toldos 142a but discussed at length in Midrash Rabba Shir Hashirim (sometimes called Midrash Chazis) 7:13. There, a long discussion is recorded between these three would-be martyrs and the prophet ...


5

A prophet is confirmed as a true prophet by repeatedly making accurate predictions of the future (and only accurate predictions) or by the [direct] testimony of another confirmed prophet. Mishneh Torah 10:5 When a prophet proclaims that another individual is [also] a prophet, we accept the latter as a prophet without requiring [any further] ...


4

I'm sure there are simpler and deeper answers, but if we go with the Midrash that the king of Nineveh was none other than the Pharaoh of Exodus -- yes, that guy who repeatedly ignored Moses' warnings, watched his empire unravel in a matter of months because of it, then eventually washed ashore from the Red Sea (the lone survivor) -- well, you'd understand ...


4

From the plain reading of the text (Daniel 3:17-18), we see that they were unsure whether Hashem would save them. In particular, they say (3:18) והן לא (and if [Hashem does] not [save us]). In Shir HaShirim Rabbah (on 7:8, על דעת ר׳ שמעון), we see a midrash that relates how Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah went to Ezekiel to ask whether Hashem would be ...


3

On the assumption that this post is different because it asks specifically what are the Messianic prophecies, and may therefore survive the challenge that it is repetitive of other questions, I will answer. There are eligibility rules for the Messiah based on various verseus. These are: He must be Jewish -- Deut. 17:15 prohibits us setting a non-Jew as a ...


3

See Aryeh Morgenstern's Hastening Redemption which discusses the messianic agenda of the Vilna Gaon's student who immigrated to the Land of Israel in the early 19th century. In Chapter 2, "Belief in 5600 (1840) As The Year of Redemption", Morgenstern provides two primary sources for the year 1840, the Zohar cited in your question and an opinion from ...


2

There seems to me to be a few reasons that the Book of Nahum/fate of Nineveh is important to Jews for all time. I am not familiar with Mishna/Gemara/Tosafot/Geonic materials(..yet...) so there could be plenty of Rabbinic views on Nahum, but to me the main reason that Nahum and Nineveh's fate are important is because Judah and Israel were oppressed ...


2

The word כשרה can also be read כְּשָׂרָה — "like Sarah" — perhaps reflecting that they were both childless, praying to have children.


2

I have heard in the name of the Chida - that women have three special Mitzvos - which is the Roshei Teivos of Chana - Ches = Chalah, Nun = Nidah, Hei = Hadlokas HaNer - and a woman who does these three is considered a Isha Ksheirah. Notwithstanding the above there is a Medrash Breishis Rabsi Parshas Chaya Sara 23:1 which lists 22 Isha Ksheiras and one of ...


2

The verse says clearly who will 'shake' all nations: God. (Verse 6 says "so said God…" and verse 7 continues "I will shake all the nations".) So your question as to which nation will shake all other nations has no answer based in Haggai. But what is referred to in verse 7 as (in very rough translation) "the best of all the nations" ("חֶמְדַּת כָּל ...


2

For the question of whether Jesus could have been the moshiach (summary: no), see this question. In a comment you say that your question isn't a duplicate of that but, rather: I want to know whether Jesus fulfills the messianic prophecies the best. Which he may do even if Jews by and large do not think he is the messiah. This doesn't really compute ...


2

Predictions are a Funny thing, especially when you allow a given year like 1840 to span a large amount of time. The early half of the 1800s was a very "active" period in Jewish history, with many things greatly affecting Jewish life today. During the era, was the formation of Modern Zionism. With the Students of the Vilna Gaon moving to Israel in the 1860s ...


1

@magicker72 and @Matt found the medrash that identifies Ezekiel as the prophet that they asked. Since they answered the question, I am just going to expand on why it appears to be a "nevuah that was not carried out". Note that he did not prophesy that they would not be saved but Ezekiel tells them that Hashem is not with them (לא מתקיים עליכם). However, ...


1

In HeiKhalot Rabbati, R. Ishmael says that the 70 weeks refers to 700 years. [137] Said Rabbi Ishmael: And even as Daniel explained I found written [Daniel 9.24] “Seventy weeks are decreed upon Thy people and upon Thy holy city to finish the transgression and to make an end of sins and to make reconciliation for iniquity and to bring in ...



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