Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

There is no archaeological evidence of the Exodus. When you get down to it, it's surprising how little archaeological proof there is of many things which we're pretty sure happened - we have difficulty identifying some entire nations which are described by sober ancient historians; and there are many monarchs who are known only by a single reference in a ...


14

See this article by R' Gil Student. He seems to be very familiar with the relevant literature, and he "believe[s] (with perfect faith) that 600,000 men and their families left Egypt," but it's clear to him that if there's any archaeological evidence of the Exodus, it's not great or conclusive. In sum: Here's the simple truth: The single largest question ...


12

It was hidden with the Aron (Ark of the Covenant) and some other things near the end of the first Temple by Yoshiyahu (King Josiah). Source: Talmud, Yoma 52b, תוספות הרא"ש על הגמרא בהוריות (יב.) , הרמב"ם (משנה תורה, הלכות בית הבחירה ד א) ‏ In the second Temple, a Kohen (a Priest-a descendant of Aharon, Moses brother) found a loose stone on the ground in the ...


7

ב"ה Hope this helps. http://members.bib-arch.org/publication.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=29&Issue=5&ArticleID=9 The finding: Reed huts more than 3,000 years old belonging to workers—perhaps slaves—and with the same floor plan as ancient Israelite four-room houses have been identified at Medinet Habu, opposite Luxor in Egypt.1 These reed huts ...


4

In the early 19th Century a papyrus, dating from the end of the Middle Kingdom, was found in Egypt. It was taken to the Leiden Museum in Holland and interpreted by A.H. Gardiner in 1909. The complete papyrus can be found in the book Admonitions of an Egyptian from a heiratic papyrus in Leiden. The papyrus describes violent upheavals in Egypt, ...


4

Please read THE RIDDLE OF THE EXODUS by James Long, a gentile who has faith in the oral tradition. He has fascinating archaeologic corroboration for many events and their geographic location.


3

shaar yichud ch.7 online The analogy of this: When one sees a letter of uniform handwriting and writing style, one will immediately consider that one person wrote it because it is not possible that there was not at least one person. If it were possible that it could have been written with less than one person, we would consider this possibility. ...


3

In my opinion, the arguments have not been disproven only that we do not understand the arguments. see the shaar yichud with commentaries (i.e. we don't study the arguments in enough depth to understand them, therefore we mistakenly think they have been disproven. hence study with the commentaries, and even then if something doesn't make sense, ask wise ...


3

I think you have to put this in context. We're talking about an age where long distance communication was almost non-existent. So while the King had absolute influence over Jerusalem - the further you traveled the less influence he had. So while it's possible that within walking distance of Jerusalem the Torah had all but been forgotten (and this is ...


3

Kaballah says that the soul enclothed within the body and it is the reflection of the Divine Form, called the tzelem (tzelem Elokim). This can be described as the spiritual mold of man's physical form, linking his body and soul. This mold is derived from the configuration of the sefirot, which structure the worlds through which the soul descends on its ...


3

It depends what level of proof you are looking for. If you mean irrefutable proof, I don't think you will find as much. If you mean indications, here are a few: The verse in Koheles (8:1) says חכמת אדם תאיר פניו a man's wisdom lights up his face. This has been understood (see, for example, here) to refer to that which there is a light in a person's ...


2

As noted here, the Chovos Halevavos makes the argument from overturned ink. However, there is a Midrashic precedent for your recollection as well, cited here: We see this in the Midrash (Midrash Temurah in Midrash Aggadot Bereshit): An athiest [sic] came to Rebbi Akiva. "Who created the world?", he queried. R. Akiva answered, "The Holy One, ...


2

According to this website, Rabbenu Bachya makes this argument in “The Duties of the Heart,” The Gate of Oneness, Chapter 6: Do you not realize that if ink were poured out accidentally on a blank sheet of paper, it would be impossible that proper writing should result, legible lines that are written with a pen? Imagine a person bringing a sheet of ...


2

No one today knows where the omer of manna is. It was presumably lost around the time of the Siege of Jerusalem, 597 BCE, although it is possible it could have been lost at other times, such as the descecration by Mannaseh. Its location today is a matter of speculation, similar to the location and fate of the Ark of the Covenant.


2

I think maybe only some of the commandments and the details of Torah (especially the punishment for idolatry and what really constitutes idolatry) was forgotten in the absence of the text. However the greater part of the how to do a lot of stuff (as what was a Shabbat violation or the niddah rules) were not forgotten, because it was more cultural than ...


2

A quick Google search results in many articles which attempt to refute the Kuzari Argument, as posited by R' Gottlieb. For example, this website (which I have not yet reviewed) presents multiple comprehensively sourced refutations. Some of the arguments (more to come): Arguments by example against the uniqueness of the Revelation story There are similar ...


1

God's mind IS the universe. Because we are IN Gods mind the only way to prove God is to CHOOSE to align our thoughts,speech and actions with HIS by reading the human beings manual (specifically ancient kabbalistic interpretation of TORAH) and doing mitzvot. In this way all our limbs, arteries, skin and flesh become Godly.You will never KNOW anything let ...


1

The laws could have been forgotten. 3,000 (!) halachos were lost in the time of the mourning for Mosheh (Rashi, Yehoshua 1:2). However, the only disputes were in matters of logic, but not in tradition (Tosfos Yom Tov, Avos 1:4).


1

This article goes through many issues of archaeology and Torah and explains things from a traditional perspective: http://truetorah.blogspot.com/2012/05/part-1-archaeology.html#more



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible