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18

There is no archaeological evidence of the Exodus. When you get down to it, it's surprising how little archaeological proof there is of many things which we're pretty sure happened - we have difficulty identifying some entire nations which are described by sober ancient historians; and there are many monarchs who are known only by a single reference in a ...


13

See this article by R' Gil Student. He seems to be very familiar with the relevant literature, and he "believe[s] (with perfect faith) that 600,000 men and their families left Egypt," but it's clear to him that if there's any archaeological evidence of the Exodus, it's not great or conclusive. In sum: Here's the simple truth: The single largest question ...


4

Please read THE RIDDLE OF THE EXODUS by James Long, a gentile who has faith in the oral tradition. He has fascinating archaeologic corroboration for many events and their geographic location.


3

ב"ה Hope this helps. http://members.bib-arch.org/publication.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=29&Issue=5&ArticleID=9 Interesting find in 2003 by Manfried Bietak. This find is actually a real game changer in proving the existence of the Israelites in Egypt. This doesnt seem to be a huge find on the surface, but really this sort of throws a wrench in the ...


3

In my opinion, the arguments have not been disproven only that we do not understand the arguments. see the shaar yichud with commentaries (i.e. we don't study the arguments in enough depth to understand them, therefore we mistakenly think they have been disproven. hence study with the commentaries, and even then if something doesn't make sense, ask wise ...


2

I think you have to put this in context. We're talking about an age where long distance communication was almost non-existent. So while the King had absolute influence over Jerusalem - the further you traveled the less influence he had. So while it's possible that within walking distance of Jerusalem the Torah had all but been forgotten (and this is ...


1

I think maybe only some of the commandments and the details of Torah (especially the punishment for idolatry and what really constitutes idolatry) was forgotten in the absence of the text. However the greater part of the how to do a lot of stuff (as what was a Shabbat violation or the niddah rules) were not forgotten, because it was more cultural than ...


1

The laws could have been forgotten. 3,000 (!) halachos were lost in the time of the mourning for Mosheh (Rashi, Yehoshua 1:2). However, the only disputes were in matters of logic, but not in tradition (Tosfos Yom Tov, Avos 1:4).



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